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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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EyesOfTheForgotten

Question for Experts, especially for Beginners: Motivation, how NOT to lose it?

10 posts in this topic

I have lost it very seriously - but i regained it - usually there is just a need for heavy vacaton and resting then preferbly yet to get bored - then you can go again ;/

Edited by fir
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Let me start by a shameless plug.

I've written an article on Gamedev about how to remain motivated during indie development.

 

Essentially, my system revolves around consistent development and helping you build a "system". In essence, it slowly forces you to incorporate a development cycle into your life cycle, until it feels natural and can't simply be skipped altogether. After a while it DOES become a habit and is much more satisfying.

 

That being said, your original post seems to be hinting not specifically at how to remain motivated to develop, but to remain motivated by a single project. While I think the above guide is still applicable, I see a few nuances.

 

I'd like to turn the question around and ask "why would I stop working on this game?". You'd probably have to come up with a list of reasons why you think this isn't worth your time, and have a number of "cost-of-option" circumstances to analyze. Maybe it is that you do have something better to be working on at that precise moment in time. It did happen to me, but I tend to return to any worthwhile project later (such as now, resuming work on a 3 months hiatus project).

 

Also, there can be no expert at motivation, just individuals that know themselves better and understanding how their brain works and coping with it. That being said, without being an existentialist, I don't believe everyone's brain is wired the same way, so what works for me (as per the above) may not work for you. I strongly believe however that, a system, is a solution that is nearly universal. Afterall, that's why many of us choose to go to work from 8 to 5!

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Let me start by a shameless plug.

I've written an article on Gamedev about how to remain motivated during indie development.

I read that when it came out! Tried it actually, kinda worked, until my normal motivation killers came >.<

 


Keep away what can ruin your motivation: client (if it's work-for-hire).

 

No matter if it's for a leaving or an hobby, detach yourself from your project sometimes! It help to come back at it with a fresh view. 

 

Show you project! Feedback can be really motivating and give inspiration smile.png

 

It already has been said but working with good group is more motivating than anything!

I like the list you got there!


There are a lot of highly unmotivated experts out there.

Okay, I guess I was Assuming a bit TOO much wasn't I? rolleyes.gif Whoops!

 

Anyhow, Thanks for all the replies so far; Keep them coming! I hope everyone who reads this learns a thing or two (including me >.<)

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I read that when it came out! Tried it actually, kinda worked, until my normal motivation killers came >.<
 

 

Did you use the checklist approach? I know I'm one to fall prey to demotivation and I happen to find something as simple as checkmarks on a trello list to be particularly satisfying (especially when I kill that 'refactor your shit to use proper getters!' or 'encapsulation rules shouldn't be broken asshole!' item off the list!)

 

Also, your second quote is not from me. Something must've gone wrong when you multi-selected.

Edited by Orymus3
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