• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
jackolater

Best Game Engine for a beginner?

7 posts in this topic

So I want to start learning how to at least make a small game before I leave school.the thing is I don't know where to start.Ive tried engines lime RPG maker and FPS Creator but those don't allow to much freedom.
So what language would be good to know,I heard C++ but no to sure.
Now the game engines
What game engine would be good to start at?
I heard There is a free version of the Unreal Engine out. Has anyone tried it? Does the Unreal Engine work well for games that aren't shooters? What 3D engine would be good for a 3D side-scroller.
Or should I start at 2D first?
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends on your goals.

 

Using a more advance engine right of the bat means that you won't learn about more basic stuff that it will hide from you (normals, matrix operations for some quick examples), but will definitely be more produtive. Start with simpler engines will teach you more, but will make your progress slower.

 

Basically you have to decide how deep you want your knowledge to be. Please notice that there is no "best" choice here, for instance a good C programmer knows how the system handles function calls and memory perfectly, but that doesn't mean he can produce better programs (or games, in this case) than a python programmer, who will have those handled for him by the language.

Edited by KnolanCross
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Using a more advance engine right of the bat means that you won't learn about more basic stuff that it will hide from you (normals, matrix operations for some quick examples), but will definitely be more produtive. Start with simpler engines will teach you more, but will make your progress slower.


I'm aware of all this,the thing is I don't really know where to start.the only engine that I can think of that is simple is game maker bit it seems way to easy to actually learn from.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends on what you want to achieve. I started with JS/HTML5 (and am still a fan of it for my hobby projects) with ImpactJS. It was perfect to get started and learn, with great documentation, and JS was/is great for fast prototyping and being able to implement new ideas quickly. It's better suited for 2D, but people have coupled it with Three.js. There are also some 3D JS engines around (like Goo), but depending on your goals it might be better to learn the basics of 2D first. By the time you move on to 3D you may be better off going to something like Unity and starting with C#.

Edited by Drakonka
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you go for 3D game programming, then Unity is the best decision. If you just want to make games/focus more on the artistic side of things, UE4 gives you better results. For non-programmers, Blueprints are great. In Unreal Engine 4, you could get official or community game templates that set the base for your project. You could play with both engines, experiment, and see which you like more. After you decide, focus on it.
The decision is yours.

P.S. UE4 is not free. It is an engine with monthly subscription, under a small fee. However, you could subscribe just for the first month and continue to use it, but you won't be able to get updates unless resubscribing. UE3 (UDK) was free, but it had some design issues that made the life hard for indies (unrealscript etc). In UE4, you can do other games than shooters, it is open for all the generes. In UE3, doing everything else than shooters was very hard.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To address one of your questions that hasn't been mentioned: UE4 can certainly do more than just shooters. In fact some of the standard templates and tutorial content address other game types, like card games for mobile for example.

 

Spending a few dollars on UE4 for a month will give you an eye-opening look at the scope and sophistication of a full professional engine. Even if you end up choosing another option, the education alone is well worth the investment.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I want to start learning how to at least make a small game before I leave school.the thing is I don't know where to start. Ive tried engines lime RPG maker and FPS Creator but those don't allow to much freedom.

 

Games aren't about any particular language. You can program text based games in vanilla C++, python, or ruby.   As a beginner, you probably won't notice the difference between an interpreted language and a compiled one. Games are generally about mechanics. Furthermore, when you involve graphics, you incur the unruly beast of 3D math: matrices, vectors, and dot products(Oh my!). Case in point: a 3d side scroller  essentially means you've taken a 3d game, positioned the camera at a right angle, and switched the camera's view matrix to orthographic -- flattening the world. Can you do this in UDK, or UE4? Yes. The most important thing to consider, when choosing an engine is not the feature set or bells and whistles, it's how well the DOCUMENTATION is. UDK is a repeat offender in this respect; in my opinion, Epic's documentation of UDK is near abysmal. Unreal 4 has made leaps and bounds, over previous iterations. Be forewarned, the unity free version comes with limitations as well, even though they're on the brink of releasing version 5 of the engine. You don't get a bunch of fancy shaders, but there's good documentation, and a lot of assets. The UI is a little drab though. 

Edited by Code_Grammer
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0