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Reaver_Zail

Question on multiplayer

5 posts in this topic

Hi, I'm new to these forums and wasn't 100% sure where to post this so I'm going to try here.

I'm looking to design an online shooter just for fun since I have the free time. And I saw a place on here to possibly get a team together. I only know the design aspects of making a game, I'm horrid at programming and my 3D rendering skill leave a lot to be desired. My basic question right now is if I went a head and got a team together to bring this idea to life, how would you implement the online part of the game? The game I'm looking at putting together would most likely go up on steam or maybe have it's own website if I got the funds together. But do you have to rent a server, or If put in steam is space on a server provided? I couldn't find much information on this subject, and any help would be awesome.

Thank you in advanced, Reaver Zail
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I kind of agree with Shippou, but not in all areas. Certainly you have big goals given your experience, but I'm not sure if I'd take that path. I don't think you're aiming for an MMO, perhaps a shooter with just a few players? It's still a tricky job, but many times easier than an MMO IMHO.

 

I would recommend learning programming, or getting someone who knows it. Depending upon your personality type, learning programming up front may work, or may not. If you feel that you'd have difficulty staying motivated working on something completely unrelated to your goals, there are some options. You could start by writing mods for existing games. There are many commercial games with map editors and simple scripting languages that may be a good starting point to get a feel for what's involved. Some games have huge mod communities, and if your level is good it would be played and critiqued.

 

The next more difficult step would be working directly with an existing game engine, such as Unity or UDK. They handle a lot of technical stuff, while being low-level enough to do some pretty cool stuff with. Start with a tutorial and try tweaking it to do something specific or just cool. Buy components written by other users or find free code samples.

 

From that point you would have a better idea whether you need to write a game engine yourself (usually a huge job) or whether you can achieve something cool with the tools you already have.

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I only know the design aspects of making a game, I'm horrid at programming and my 3D rendering skill leave a lot to be desired.

Sorry to say it, but unless you're able to pay people you'll find it very difficult to recruit skilled team members if you're a designer (especially if you're an unproven one who can't show prior work!) who won't be contributing technical skills to the project.  I recommend a read through the old topic "what programmers want from a designer", where you'll find a number of lengthy and detailed responses detailing what your potential team members might expect of you in such a situation.

 


But do you have to rent a server, or If put in steam is space on a server provided?

Unless it's designed to run in a web-browser, players need to download your game client from somewhere; this involves a web-host (server) where you would host your website and the download.  If your game is on Steam you don't have to offer a separate download, and web-hosting would not be needed unless you also want to have your own website -- most games do still have a website for marketing purposes.

 

However, as you want to create a multi-player game you may or may not need a server for players to connect to during the game (or possibly just for match-making) as well!  See the next part of my response for a little more on this...

 


I went a head and got a team together to bring this idea to life, how would you implement the online part of the game?

There are a number of different possible answers to this depending on the specific needs of your game and how it's being made, and as you're a non-programmer I'm not sure how much technical detail would benefit you, so my suggestion would be that you would sort out the specifics of your implementation with a programmer who understands the intended design of your game in more detail.  It may well involve renting a server, so be prepared for the fact that this may be a cost you have to pay for.  If you still want to try to sort out more of this yourself beforehand you might try starting with a read through the Multiplayer and Network Programming Forum FAQ and then come back with any specific questions you still have.

 

 

 

Hope that helps! :)

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Hmm well your responses have given me a lot to think about.

As far as learning programming, I know I can't. I tries learning java and Python and neither one clicked. If I can't even learn the easiest languages I doubt I could do anything with HTML or C++. I have a hard time with math, and some trouble with letters both together just doesn't click in my brain. I stuck with Python for two years and couldn't get past having text and simple pictures to come up and maybe have a button and another picture or different text would pop up. After that I just get lost.

As far as experience, I should have given more of my background. Even though I have never made a physical game, I have put them on paper from start to finish, as well I have written quite a few of short stories. Since I got dragon and help with my trouble with letters I have seen a great improvement in getting the full picture this in my head onto paper and now want to try and bring something from my head to life. So I wouldn't say I'm just some guy that got an undeveloped idea on my head and am jumping head first into a situation without thinking.

My idea is kind of like TF2 a shooter with different classes. But with a lot of marked differences. You can kind of customize your class through armor choices, and it's a science fiction third person suck and cover shooter and I'm thinking about adding a mode of gameplay that would really make the game stand out. Within the classes I have been developing the weapons and abilities they use, as well as the environment details and art style. I'm not done by far, and am no where near ready to get a team together. But I so believe that this game would be a welcome change of pace to the shooter genera, and would get a lot of attention.

Maybe I am over my head, but would still like to see this game made. Perhaps I'm going about this the wrong way. I don't care about money or whatever, I just want to play the game I have in my head lol. Maybe if I gave my idea to someone that has the tools to bring the game to life then maybe that's a better option. Although I would hate to see my idea go from my idea to something I can't recognize.
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