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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Daniel Thomas Jr.

A question about publishers

9 posts in this topic

Ok, so yesterday I had asked for help for a game, and that  quickly got shut down! Sorry I didn't quite know where to go with that kind of post. Someone I talked with yesterday brought to my attention of how large scale my project is. He recommended me to come here, and ask about the possibilities of going to a publisher that would like the pitch enough to lend a team big enough to finish it, but I'm not quite sure how that works. If there is a way how should I start, and where should I go? I am 18, just out of high school, and I need to start somewhere. 

 

 

 

Also, I read about the "Mythical man-month" guy, the "ideal guy", and how to manage a team, and were all interesting topics by the way. You just don't understand that I've heard all of those things too many times before. You know "you don't need to start something you know you can finish man, you know you have do something you know you can get done" , and do get me wrong I know the challenge I am facing. So, no I don't, I'm delusional, quit what I am doing because its too hard, no one will start anything with you, you are just the man who starts something and doesn't go through with it? No, it doesn't mean I am not going to run from it, but my project is neither just an idea anymore, nor is a late project in regards to the Mythical man-month thing. This is something I am really passionate about doing, and I intend on going through with it to the end. I would just like to say look at some of these bigger teams, like what was once irrational games. They took 5 years to create Bioshock Infinite, a game with considerable size, and finished it. Sure it had a few delay, but that was from all the criticism, and bugs that come from the development process. A big team or not, obstacles are always in the way, and I have clear mind of what I want to set out to accomplish. That is the difference between me, and those guys.

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Hahaha, actually it is funny you mention that. I actually I'm learning, and we are going to make a prototype. You know I it is kind of a go as you learn type thing. Also, I am aware that I can't just walk up empty hand, hahaha. It is like giving someone a key to nothing.

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From what I have read, almost all publishers won't touch indie developers until they have (at least) a prototype to give an idea of the vision they have and the direction they want to go in. Looking at your closed thread, this thread, and the steam thread makes me have to ask: how many games have you done before this one? All your conjecture sounds like that usual things I see from delusional beginners (which isn't necessarily a bad thing as I know a few guys who started out as delusional beginners and are now seasoned indie developers). Your idea sounds interesting, but you have to realize that most programmer's time is very valuable to them so getting an experienced programmer is going to be almost impossible (without upfront compensation) and in truth, your project will likely attract beginners that have either never done a game themselves or view your idea as a learning experience (meaning they may move on at any point if they feel they are stuck). The problem with forming a team with guys you have never met, communication, you may have a certain idea and if you can't communicate it fully, your team may misunderstand and do something different from what you had in mind. 

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A couple of them I actually do know personally, and the others we have had google hangout sessions, and I've explained everything to them in better detail. By now they all see where it will go, we just have to get to that prototype pretty soon. Like you said we will need a good programmer, I'm learning. Which is why we are probably going to use Unreal Engine 4, it just seem like it would be a lot more possible that way.

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I have indeed thought about all of that stuff. The purpose of this game is to tie a bridge between stories in my comic book universe, which is planned out from beginning to the end. 

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The purpose of this game is to tie a bridge between stories in my comic book universe, which is planned out from beginning to the end. 

You are making a game to fill in between stories of a comic book that isn't published or even has a following? That is kind of like putting the carriage before the horse. This is always risky as most game-movie or game-comic hybrids like that end up hurting each other. Most companies will do what dejaime pointed out, if they see a potential franchise in your idea, they will make it so you sign the IP over to them and the first time they feel you can't deliver they will kick you to the curb and put their team on it. Don't believe us? Look at EA, they bought out Pandemic Studios, let everyone go except the teams that were working on The Saboteur and Mercenaries 3, after The Saboteur was done (from what I have read) they let the team go too. This is one scenario that you run the risk of happening when approaching a publisher.

Edited by BHXSpecter
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Which is why I have shifted gears more towards getting the comic published, It is pretty much ready to go into production. However, We still are going to work on that prototype in the meantime. It will give us something to work with later on.

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