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mileafly

Is there any point to releasing on Ouya, Windows Phone or XBLI?

13 posts in this topic

I wonder if anyone have any information on this? I have dipped my toes a bit into different platforms like Android and iOS and have a somewhat accrurate feeling about those markets (I think*). It seems like very crowded markets, but it is possible to do well, especially on iOS it seems. I have no idea or slightest clue though how platforms like Ouya, Windows Phone or Xbox live indie does in comparison. Have anyone here released on those platforms and have some information? It feels like you never hear anything about those platforms, but maybe that is just because I am not focusing on them. 

 

Maybe someone have even released a game on all these platforms and know how they differed? For me personally it seems like in regards to revenue I would say I have experienced something like 70% on iOS and 30% on Android. I just wonder what that number would look like if I tried to release on the other platforms to... Do anyone have any information on what you can expect on these platforms compared? Do you feel they are worth porting your game over to?

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IMO the Ouya is a flop. As for XBLIG, well the 360 is on its way out so don't waste your time there. I think WP8.1, PC, and other mobile platforms are viable as of right now.

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All three look grim, to be quite candid about it. I would only visit WinPhone 8 with an already successful game from another platform. The others aren't even worth wondering about.

Edited by Promit
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Ouya didn't work well, and now they're stuck with the worse of both worlds:

There are too many games to easily showcase.

Few games are actually worth playing.

 

This amount to poor traffic, thus even poorer sales.

 

Just look at how desperate their marketing currently is...

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It seems more common to make money from ads on Android - massive market, and doesn't matter whether the players are willing to pay up or not.

 

On the Ouya, it will be interesting to see how similar things like the Amazon Fire TV do - they're all basically Android, the main work at the moment is making something that works for "big TV + controller" rather than handled touchscreen game.

 

All three look grim, to be quite candid about it. I would only visit WinPhone 8 with an already successful game from another platform. The others aren't even worth wondering about.

 

Well, the OP is asking about stories of people who have released, rather than whether something "looks" grim - why does Windows Phone "look grim" out of interest? An already successful game makes it far easier, though that's true about releasing for any platform.

 

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I've released on WinPhone and XBLIG. Both of which I won't do again :)

In fact, even Android is a tough market unless you've already managed to break even on iOS...

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Honestly, no matter how 'grim' a platform looks, releasing on them gives you a very important thing. It actually gives you two important things. 

1) Exposure. You are getting your games out to gamers and hopefully getting useful feedback other than "this sucks because I don't like it". 

2) You are gaining experience (whether it be programming, porting, team management, artist, sound, etc.).

 

To me, those two things far outweigh any amount of money because those two things look good on resumes.

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1) Exposure. You are getting your games out to gamers and hopefully getting useful feedback other than "this sucks because I don't like it". 

 

Egh, remember how long it can take to make a port :)

Ideally, you don't want to go bankrupt in the process.

 

Also, one important note here. If you make a game for 'every platform', you're also lowering your target specs and limiting what you 'can do'. Most platforms have limitations (Which are never as simple as linear through GPU and CPU power), so you'll end up not being able to use this or that method, with this or that type of graphic (no atf, no spritesheets, no 9-slice, etc.).

Pretty quickly, your overall game ships with half the quality that you had set out to do.

 

Know your target platforms and worry about ports later.

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Egh, remember how long it can take to make a port
Ideally, you don't want to go bankrupt in the process.

Well taking that into consideration, he shouldn't consider anything other than Windows(PC), Mac, Linux, Android, and iOS (as those are the most popular and safe bets market wise).

 

Either way my advice still is applicable. You want to get your game out to as many gamers as possible to get as much feedback as possible and should look at every system as a porting possibility. You also gain valuable experience in everything you do while making the games and ports. Nothing you pointed out negates my advice.

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Either way my advice still is applicable. You want to get your game out to as many gamers as possible to get as much feedback as possible and should look at every system as a porting possibility. You also gain valuable experience in everything you do while making the games and ports. Nothing you pointed out negates my advice.

 

While what you say is true, it is impractical. Trying to do all the ports yourself is going to take a considerable amount of time - time in which your game could have been finished and actually be getting exposure, or money to hire someone else to do it for you - money which people making a first game do not have.  And in the first instance it is time in which you are not generating income.  It is far better to have a game that is 100% complete on a single platform than a game that is 80% complete on multiple platforms.

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 It is far better to have a game that is 100% complete on a single platform than a game that is 80% complete on multiple platforms.

I concede, my advice was stupid and ill thought out, but to be honest I can't think of any game in recent years that have been (outside of a few indie teams) 100% complete on any platform. It seems to have become a normal thing for AAA companies to ship partially done games and do updates to fix things (GTAV is a recent example of this, a few updates back they broke the firetruck functionality (water hose would no longer fire when driving it) and was an update or two before they fixed it). Anyways, just ignore my previous advice as I don't want anyone wasting money or time because of me.

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seems to have become a normal thing for AAA companies to ship partially done games and do updates to fix things

 

On many platforms (sony and xbox consoles, and even for Apple's 2 weeks) this is due to the delay between shipping the game and it going live. If the developer wants to hit a date, knowingly of the delay caused by the publishing partner, they need to ship 'too early' and prepare for a day-one patch.

 

For example:

 

1st party takes 2 weeks

You want to hit July 21

You ship July 7 and expect positive approval by the 21.

From July 7 to July 21, you keep hammering down these bugs and prepare a patch to send over as soon as you get approved.

Patch gets approved must faster and airs live around the 23rd.

 

(above example considered fast-tracked for smaller consoles such as Apple).

 

That's the 'dirty' effect of 1st party approval. Of course, initial submission still needs to go through TRC, Lotchecks, etc. So the upside is the game won't crash on boot (hopefully).

 

That's one of the many reasons why I'm leaning to PC markets nowadays (Steam, Desura, etc.) Even when they're not proprietary, they give the developer much more power over "when to release" and this tend to leave much less dirty day-1 patches (which often come on day 5+).

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As a user of Lumia 920 for around 2 years, I had chance to witness progress in WP market.

 

WP market has advantage of easier exposure and no-jailbreak but smaller share, I expect rise with 8.1 but majority of platform consists of entry-level devices like 520.

 

But for Ouya etc, I couldn't care less as long as there is no Microsoft pushing them.

Edited by Unduli
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