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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Inugami

In need on some guidance.

8 posts in this topic

Hello all, I recently take seriously on making a game, I'm thinking small and not a AAA game but I have plenty of ideas for one. To archive this I found out plenty of ways to do it but I haven't choose one yet because on different sizes some people say learn this first and then the rest or learn the other because the other engine is just boring, etc. So here are my questions/doubts.

Idea - For the first game I'm trying is a enemy wave game, where you have to defend a position from waves of enemies. I think is ok to start since I know there's solo developers who have done them and now have a team to make the game bigger. So that's where I want to start, something simple. I haven't decide yet on making multiples maps for the player to choose or make a big one where you have to run/fly to get to the next objective.

1- Game Engine - UDK, UE4 or Cryengine? I try all 3 and there's different ways to make the terrain for example faster than others. I try to use the BSP in UDK and was a bit confusing needing to resize before you actually add the BSP wall or anything, the terrain tool was good but is not like Cryengine that generates most of it in one go. Also in UDK is easier to make destructible mesh like walls since have the destructible joint (I believe is the name) while in Cryengine you have to do it in a 3D modeling software. I see lots of people making this extensive maps with buildings in 2 hours (or so they claim) while I don't even know where to start to make a simple house.

2- 3D Modeling - 3DS or Maya? Money is not the problem here. I read on several sites that 3DS have a easier learning curve than Maya. While in Maya the Character modeling and rendering looks more eye candy. Also some say that 3DS is the one to use for game development but others say that Maya is currently in top for modeling because have more options. I try 3DS and got be able to make a helicopter out of it with tutorials but when I did the turbosmooth everything goes bad to worst and end on reshaping everything and that got me down while in Maya I really didn't finish anything because the tutorials got cutted off but seems it don't have this turbosmooth problem but it does have a bit with symmetry. I like how the animation looks in Maya more than 3DS but I need your opinion on it.

3- Language - C++, LUA or Java? I know kind of C++, I have experience in LUA but no experience with JAVA. I read that UDK use Kismet and Unreal Script but people say is kinda useless to learn them now since UE4 is going to kill UDK soon. Also I don't want to use Unity since I try it once and I really dislike it.

Those are my main issues so far and that's why I haven't start yet buying or learning anything because I wanna make the right choice and not lose time learning something that I can make with another software better and faster. I have so far the concept and how the gameplay can be but need your help with those decisions. Thanks in advance everyone!. Sorry for my English.

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I don't know if this answers your question but you can make this kind of game with Lua in Roblox.

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they are all irrelevant.

Just choose whatever you want and get going.. these are not "issues", they are just excuses to faff around.

Wow what a dev community and want me to subscribe for this kind of answers... Thanks a lot...

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Keep in mind software compatibility, what's the point of good 3D modeling software if you can't import models and animation in your engine.
I would recommend learning programing language based on engine you choose, for example if you choose UE4 then learn C++.

2- 3D Modeling - 3DS or Maya?
They are virtually the same, but Maya tends more to movie industry, so choose what better suits you.

Just grab whatever you see as the best option and put your idea to life.
Good Luck!biggrin.png

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I'd probably just defer the modelling, do you really need models right away for a game?  Once you get farther along you can replace the cubes or spheres or whatever the default models/animations are that come with UE4 with your custom stuff.

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1. Different engines are, well, different. Play with all of them and decide what you feel most comfortable with. I would say try to not go near UDK since it maybe discontinued soon.

 

2. I say Maya is better but some people like 3Ds. For this I would suggest getting some one to help you with it so getting a friend or someone to be your modeller or whatever they are called. If you really want to do it then I would say jump into Maya and watch some tutorials on youtube for it.

 

3. I know JAVA and I would say don't try and learn it. If you are already familiar with C++ use it. In the end most languages do the same thing with different ways of doing it.

 

Hope I helped.

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