• Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  

Flight Simulator licensing?

This topic is 1392 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Hello,

 

I have a few guys I have gathered together as team and we all love WW2. I have titled our project as 'Knights of the Pacific'. It is a WW2 Flight Combat Simulator showcasing the air battles that took place there. I have a hiccup though. How do you go about requesting licensing for use of product names? For example the Vought aircrfat compnay name is now owned by The Triumph Group. I have sent them repeated e-mails but have not recieved a response as of yet. Is there an official legal for to fill out and mail to get ths done? Or since this is historical in context do I even need to ask for permission?

 

Thank you,

 

Isaac

 

Early box art concept (althogh the game would be desiminated digitally)

 

[attachment=22441:KOTP.png]

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement

1. How do you go about requesting licensing for use of product names? For example the Vought aircrfat compnay name is now owned by The Triumph Group. I have sent them repeated e-mails but have not recieved a response as of yet.
2. Is there an official legal for to fill out and mail to get ths done?
3. Or since this is historical in context do I even need to ask for permission?


1. You need to call on the telephone. It'll go much faster and get you your answer much more reliably.
2. Ask when you get someone on the phone.
3. Ask when you get someone on the phone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As to whether you need permission to display a real world product, it's a bit of a grey area... For example, EA used to license all of the weapons used in their games, but recently they decided to backflip on their policy and they now use real-world guns without paying any license fees, claiming that they don't have to.

 

Seeing that you're reproducing military equipment from over 50 years ago, I would guess that you'd be pretty safe from any kind of copyright infringement claims... You could get in touch with a lawyer who specializes in copyright to get some solid advice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IIRC EA's claim is based on the idea that guns are not the "main subject" of their games.. in other words, they don't make a game about guns so the licensed material is just part of a background.

I am not sure this will fly (pun intended :P ) when it comes to a game about airplanes.

As usual with these things, it's all about how much you're willing to gamble.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 


As usual with these things, it's all about how much you're willing to gamble.

And EA has much deeper pockets, should things go sideways.

 

yep.. and that's also why I never gamble on these things tongue.png

 

Although, every time you make a game you are gambling.. with so many retarded copyrights, patents and patent trolls out there.. it's always a gamble.

Edited by kunos

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IIRC EA's claim is based on the idea that guns are not the "main subject" of their games.. in other words, they don't make a game about guns so the licensed material is just part of a background.

I am not sure this will fly (pun intended tongue.png ) when it comes to a game about airplanes.

As usual with these things, it's all about how much you're willing to gamble.

 

Found this little tidbit of info from an actual law firm. So, my apprehension is disappearing quickly.

 

http://www.bradleygross.com/2012/03/ea-sued-over-use-of-helicopters-in.html

 

I'm really loving the Outerra game engine too!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One more thing:

 

The term of copyright for a particular work depends on several factors. Copyright protection may be affected if the copyright has been published, and, if so, the date of first publication. Generally, for works created after January 1, 1978, copyright protection lasts for the life of the author or copyright owner plus an additional 70 years. For example, if the author is now age 21 and lives 75 more years, copyright protection would last for 145 years.

 
The aircraft in my SIM were created well before 1978.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

One more thing:

 

The term of copyright for a particular work depends on several factors. Copyright protection may be affected if the copyright has been published, and, if so, the date of first publication. Generally, for works created after January 1, 1978, copyright protection lasts for the life of the author or copyright owner plus an additional 70 years. For example, if the author is now age 21 and lives 75 more years, copyright protection would last for 145 years.

 
The aircraft in my SIM were created well before 1978.

 

 

It won't just be copyright infringement you have to worry about though.  There's also trade marks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement