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mileafly

How important is localization?

12 posts in this topic

This is one area I have 0 experience in. When I release an app for iOS or Android I just put in the English description. But does it really help much to localize the decription or even ingame language to different languages, and if so, which languages are worth bothering with? This is assuming you have a resonable popular game.

 

Can you really bump up your downloads by having more languages? Do some countries not even show your game if the description or ingame language is not translated to their language? (Like if you are browsing the Japanese Appstore?) 

 

The reason I am sceptical is because I don't think I have ever personally read the description of a game, there are mostly just boring sales pitch words as far as I can tell. I just look at the screenshots to see if the game looks interesting. But maybe I am the exception. 

 

Do anyone know about this?

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But does it really help much to localize the decription or even ingame language to different languages, and if so, which languages are worth bothering with?

 
It only matters if you want your game to be popular in non-English-speaking countries. If you don't care about non-English-speaking markets, then fine.
You mustn't assume that everyone who might enjoy your game behaves the same way you do when considering games. You may just look at a pretty picture and decide, without reading any words, that the depicted game appeals to you. But a lot of people don't do things the way you do.

maybe I am the exception.


I'm sure there are others who do it the way you do. Just not everyone. Words matter to many people. Edited by Tom Sloper
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Generally, games I've worked on fall into either of these categories:

 

- Targetted product: English-only

 

- Possibly popular or culture-agnostic product: EFIGS

*Worked mostly with AAA or high-budget games.

 

My point is, if you're having a lot of success with english-only, keep at it.

If some people are starting to poke you for a translation, localize in that dialect only (chances are that you've tapped into a culture-bound key to success without your knowing). It happened to me once: my game was attracting unexpected attention from a German 'niche crowd', and the localization was worth making, but it doesn't happen often (you should ignore Tagalog/Philippines: they'll always ask for localizations, but they will never buy anything).

 

If you have a larger scale product in hand and need the extra sales, and you're sure that your product translates well to other languages without too many culture-centric themes, go EFIGS.

(English, French, Italian, German, Spanish). 

 

If you know what you're doing, do some Asian loc. You can get a LOT MORE sales, but this assumes your game can be localized for the Asian crowd (not just translated).

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Thanks! If you don't decide to localize the whole game is it at least a good idea to have the app description in the EFIGS languages? Would that help anything to reach these other markets? Do your game even show up in the appstore for example in non-english speaking countries if you only have an english description?

 

I tried to browse the appstore and change my store to different ones like germany and russia and look at the biggest games like Angry Birds but they still only showed in full english for me no matter what store I choose so that can't be right?.

Is it possible to browse the store how it really looks in those countries?  

Edited by mileafly
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I would recommend against localizing the store only. This could cause confusion and expectations from your players, which in turn could be met with stern low ratings when they realize the game isn't localized (you know how these players can be eh!).

As for whether they show in different countries, it depends on what countries you've selected.

 

Angry Birds DOES show as english in all stores currently. You're not wrong :)

But I would assume the bulk of angry birds sales to be usa-centric (with some parts of Europe). I could be wrong though.

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Angry birds definitely is localized. 

Seems It can be a bit tricky to change the language in your app store though, took me a few tries and re-logins before I got it to change properly.

I think I had to also change the region of my apple id.

I'm currently seeing the description in french now smile.png

 

Most people seems to say you always should localize for at least EFIGS if you want to do well in those markets. (Apple recommends it among others)

If not the game, at least the app description.

 

Personally I think how important it is also depends on the genre, and your target audience.

 

One of our best selling games is english only, it's a bmx action game, and even though there is a fair amount of text in tutorials and challenge descriptions, it seems to do pretty well in non-english markets too.

A lot of players hardly ever read any texts in games anyhow, even if they are in their own language...

If the game is well designed, it works fine anyway.

 

But translating the app description is pretty cheap, and any little thing you can do to convince people to at least try your game is a good thing smile.png

Edited by Olof Hedman
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German is beneficial not only because Germany is a huge video game market but also because it's a hood language to verify the graphics side of localization. German translations will typically be the longest snd hardest to "fit" due to how many very long words the language has.

I wonder if it would be possible to split those words with a hyphen? I was talking to a German friend once about those "long words", it turns out they're actually separate words, it's just that the space is omitted. Of course the splitting idea only works if you can afford to have multiple lines...

 

Spanish also tends to have phrases which are much longer than their English counterparts, which can put a dent on your available screen space.

 


Lots of people think Asian languages will be hard but usually they're not that bad at all compared to German since they won't usually require you to change or update UI layouts so often.

From a technical viewpoint, the biggest issue would be memory usage (it's not the same having tens of characters than having thousands), which on mobile is usually a big issue (every byte counts, both due to download time and due to running out of space in the limited phone's internal memory). But yeah, from an interface issue Asian languages are usually the easiest to deal with (just make sure the resolution is large enough to make the characters readable).

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I wonder if it would be possible to split those words with a hyphen? I was talking to a German friend once about those "long words", it turns out they're actually separate words, it's just that the space is omitted. Of course the splitting idea only works if you can afford to have multiple lines...

 

You can, but if you want to do it right, it's not straight forward to do automatically. You want to prioritize hyphen on the actual word parts, but to do that, you need a german dictionary!

Second priority is splitting on syllables of a word. Even harder to automate, though you can approximate it by simply splitting after the first consonant after a vowel.

Though just splitting after a consonant (and ignoring syllables and words) will likely produce lots of "weird" splits.

 

Or you need a german speaker who can do it manually, but then you are back on manual work...

 

Other "fun" languages are hebrew and arabic. Can your layout handle all strings being reversed? smile.png

 

Man, languages are tricky.

Edited by Olof Hedman
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If you have 3 languages in a game, say English, German and French. Do you upload 3 different versions of the game or do you need to have all languages in the same game? Also if you are supposed to have a single version of the game containing all the languages how do you detect what country they bought it from so it starts up in the right language?

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If you have 3 languages in a game, say English, German and French. Do you upload 3 different versions of the game or do you need to have all languages in the same game? Also if you are supposed to have a single version of the game containing all the languages how do you detect what country they bought it from so it starts up in the right language?

 

You usually have all languages in the same.

 

For text strings, this is usually handled automatically, you never use literal strings in code, but a string ID.

You then have several string lists, one for every language, and the device makes sure to load the right one.

 

If you can get it to work with just changing all strings, that is all you have to do.

 

Things like numbers and currencies has to be run through a number formatter, that format it according to the region. (currency symbol before or after,  using . or , as decimal divider, etc)

 

Sometimes though there is some minor code change needed for a particular language or region.

For that, all platforms have some API to ask what language the user wants, and you can then take any action necessary.

Edited by Olof Hedman
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Do you want to sell your game to a few thousand Americans or to tens of thousands of people around the world? America has only 350 million people but the world has 7 billion. More languages = more markets = more sales.

Nah... I'm a german, I play games for more than 30 years, and 99% of all the games I played were english only. I would even say, that most of the internet is english only. You have the nativ speaking english markets (US, UK, AUS), you have countries where almost everyone can speak english, atleast the iOS users (eg india), you have countries where english is part of the school system (eg germany) and you have lot of people who knows enough  english to understand the gameplay (as long as you dont have a story telling game ;-) ).

 

With english you will cover most of the paying market, even the strong german market. I would localize it only if it sells good in the english market first.

Edited by Ashaman73
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Nah... I'm a german, I play games for more than 30 years, and 99% of all the games I played were english only. I would even say, that most of the internet is english only.
There is a good reason for that, too. Translations are usually so abysmal that they make you want to shout. I still find myself using localized software in English nowadays because when I use it in German, I'm not getting to do what I want because either I'm getting annoyed with the many grammar errors (genitive in particular seems to be a real challenge), or, not at all rarely, I can't even understand what the hell they're trying to tell me. Sometimes I back-translate to English and do a web search for a screenshot in English to figure out what a particular checkbox or button is meant to be (also necessary to find relevant documentation sometimes. Thank you to Microsoft in particular for even translating the names of system services to unintellegible gibberish so nobody can figure out what that crap actually means).

 

Which leads to the second most important point with localization: If you bother localizing, then please be so kind and do translations correctly, by a professional translator (not a translator that works for $2.50 per hour, and not some friend who says he speaks a few words and will do it for free). And be sure that people are able to figure out what you're talking about.

If you can't provide that, then please don't localize. Please, just, don't. English is fine, leave it there.

 

(The most important point of localization being: translation is only a small subset of localization. Don't upset your customers with something that looks like what they're used to at first sight, and then doesn't work as they expect.)

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You can, but if you want to do it right, it's not straight forward to do automatically. You want to prioritize hyphen on the actual word parts, but to do that, you need a german dictionary!

Second priority is splitting on syllables of a word. Even harder to automate, though you can approximate it by simply splitting after the first consonant after a vowel.

Though just splitting after a consonant (and ignoring syllables and words) will likely produce lots of "weird" splits.

Honestly I've reached the conclusion that at least for games it's usually easier to just do it manually. I'm just wondering if German people would find it weird if those words got split with a hyphen.

 

Automatic word wrapping is fun (not). Take for example Japanese, there isn't any sort of separator between words. Your options are either to let the program split wherever it wants (including in the middle of a word), separate the words manually, or use a dictionary with every word possible to tell where word wrap should be allowed (and this last one is not necessarily foolproof!).

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