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rouncer

specialistism?

13 posts in this topic

I feel like I cant think properly, I have an ill mind and it doesn't help it. I can manage small things at a time quite successfully though, and that's how I have to live, understanding one thing and the rest a complete mystery I have to rely upon others to understand for me.  
 
Which I know is not good enough, i'm left possibly a victim of a charlatan,  Sometimes I wonder, if even god takes advantage of my ignorance, for example what if my computer could actually go 10000000 times faster than what I think it goes like, because its been dampened in power, for no reason.   Because god is taken advantage of things I dont know.  You have to rely apon others, like the visiting plumber, the doctor, here and there, they know things you dont know.  
 
The small things I handle is my software programming knowledge, which I know other people must trust me for, my conscience would never let me knowingly take advantage but my fears are other people will do it to me.  I don't trust anyone.
 
how smart does that sound, not very, but its honest. I think there is a word for this idea, like specialistism, or something. its disturbing.  
 
There is a solution though, put some effort into learning how things work yourself, no matter how disgusted or disinterested you are in the subject, what makes it interesting, is the fact that its important to your existence, or you wouldn't be worried about it, then you can battle against your own ignorance.
 
This idea was present in "cube" that interesting and clever low budget(ish) sci fi movie. where one of the members in the movie built the outside of the giant trap they were in, but didnt know what it was even for.
Edited by rouncer
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Is there a question in there somewhere?

It looks like a rant that you need to rely on other people. Unless you are planning on writing everything including the operating system, the device drivers, the compilers, and everything else, you'll need to rely on other developers.
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I share the sentiment actually (to a degree).

It was one of my hidden motives to become an indie, and to effectively do it 'all on my own': know every angle.

 

There's a lot of satisfaction with doing more parts, being 100% responsible for a brick is more satisfying than 1% of a NASA shuttle.

 

That being said, that train of thought originated in the fear of not being able to do 'shit' after an apocalypse. My fear of not being able to properly build some of the commodities of today (Microwave!) led me to try to have a more hands-on experience. The compartmentalization of our society had led to great progress (otherwise un-achievable), but it also makes it that much more frail. However unlikely, what if all engineers and engineering books disappeared? How would the rest of us fend for ourselves?

 

I generally don't think too much about that, until somebody else mentions it obviously ;)

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However unlikely, what if all engineers and engineering books disappeared? How would the rest of us fend for ourselves?

 

Prehistoric people manage, so I'm sure we'll cope.

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It may be easier to cope with the pressure to know everything once you understand that there's a natural limit to what one can know about something in the universe.

On the deepest of levels, as studied by quantum theory, the universe is governed by phenomena that are unpredictable in a certain way. When you extrapolate this to the higher levels (where our daily life resides), you realize that some things are naturally out of complete comprehension. There's no way to know everything
The thought of that can be liberating to some, perhaps similar to the notion that there's a divine, mysterious force taking care of you and the universe.
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My personal fear is more to every-day commodities matters personally. I don't seek to 'know everything', but having the understanding that I could rebuild a significant part of everyday's appliances in case of catastrophe would be a comforting thought.

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how many programmers even know how ac current works, from the magnet to the transformer to the diodes.   and quantum physics, i know nothing about, if I thought anything about Einstien's theory id be completely without any standard of knowledge to contest anything.  You forgot how important it was to be a plumber, not all this high level c code that depends on the entire development of technology I know nothing about.

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how many programmers even know how ac current works, from the magnet to the transformer to the diodes.   and quantum physics, i know nothing about, if I thought anything about Einstien's theory id be completely without any standard of knowledge to contest anything.  You forgot how important it was to be a plumber, not all this high level c code that depends on the entire development of technology I know nothing about.

 

Nobody knows everything, which is why human beings work in groups and use one another's skills to get things done. A plumber alone isn't going to get very much further than any other random guy if all modern technology were to disappear tomorrow. Very few people are self-sufficient, and they usually don't do it for the fun of it (and no, going "off the grid" doesn't count as being self-sufficient - it just means you can sort of generate your own power for now and the near future - do you also grow your own food, cut your own wood, can you heal yourself when you break your leg or get bitten by a venomous animal, can you repair your roof on your own if a storm knocks it down, and, more importantly, would you want to have to do all that yourself for the next 40 or 50 years?).

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how many programmers even know how ac current works, from the magnet to the transformer to the diodes.   and quantum physics, i know nothing about, if I thought anything about Einstien's theory id be completely without any standard of knowledge to contest anything.  You forgot how important it was to be a plumber, not all this high level c code that depends on the entire development of technology I know nothing about.

 

You are a little bit incoherent, but Einstein tried to contest quantum mechanics right till his death, so even Geniuses may have challenges, even though they may seem to you to "know all".

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Few electricians know how to design software. Few hardware techs know what a linked list is.

What's your point?
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A teacher at college always raves on about "versatilists" and how "only versatilists can be successful in today's society". I mostly agree with him.

 

You don't need to know shit about anything, the only thing you need is the ability to learn about a certain focused subject in a short period of time and know how to apply that knowledge to solve a problem.

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You don't need to know shit about anything, the only thing you need is the ability to learn about a certain focused subject in a short period of time and know how to apply that knowledge to solve a problem.

 

Nice one. I totally agree :D

In regards of the case of an apocalypse, I think that common sense can keep someone alive enough time to meet people who will complete your skillset. Basic thing like building a fire, a simple shelter, orientation with the sun and north star, etc.... But, well it's a rather extreme exemple :D (But very interesting)

In my opinion, In a development job point of view, being a specialist with a global understanding is a good option. I mean having an area with a good level (in the case of gamedev, for exemple : Programmer) but knowing a little how the rest work (knowing a bit of gamedesign to better understand what he wants, a bit of 3D modelisation knowledge to be able to speak with artists, etc..) is very valuable. But mastering every field is maybe too much for an average human. (not impossible, but hard)

 

 My fear of not being able to properly build some of the commodities of today (Microwave!) 

 

Fill a pot with water and make it boil, then put whatever you have to "mlcrowave" in a recipient that you put in your pot. I suppose it would work for canned food. But never tried myslef.

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I share the sentiment actually (to a degree).

It was one of my hidden motives to become an indie, and to effectively do it 'all on my own': know every angle.

 

There's a lot of satisfaction with doing more parts, being 100% responsible for a brick is more satisfying than 1% of a NASA shuttle.

 

That being said, that train of thought originated in the fear of not being able to do 'shit' after an apocalypse. My fear of not being able to properly build some of the commodities of today (Microwave!) led me to try to have a more hands-on experience. The compartmentalization of our society had led to great progress (otherwise un-achievable), but it also makes it that much more frail. However unlikely, what if all engineers and engineering books disappeared? How would the rest of us fend for ourselves?

 

I generally don't think too much about that, until somebody else mentions it obviously ;)

 

Yeah, I very much share this sentiment. Even though specialization is great for the economy, I cant stand not-knowing. I may not be the best programmer, the best mathematician, the best physicist, or the best biologist, but my employability in knowing a whole lot about all of these subjects is just fine, and I get to do actually interesting work. Aspiring to be a generalist has worked out for me. Lying here in my self-constructed bed, Id like to think id do relatively well if society did collapse.

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Having knowledge will unlikely earn you total independence, wheather even greater independence. If I would want my broken leg be done, I would teach someone how to do it (it gets reversed interestingly), or, tell him what to do while being broken up -(check whaether I bleed to inside areas of mine, seek blue spots that seem to grow in time, open up the spot and seek bigger vein that got broken, cut it and place both ends on a dull stick , if I happen to bleed to head spacing, do a thin opening to my head skull, and when blood stops strawing out too far temporary seal it, prepare blood of my type, place it to my vains as I will loose much blood while waiting to have inside bleeding seal itself. After time critical stuff is done,  wake me up and we will be working out broken bones... ).

The problem would be with people around being incapable, or without knowledge, but knowledge is only vital requirement, but unluckuly not sufficient requirement. On too many things.

 

Earning an independence to live is awesome and everyone would want it, but there are aspects such as experience, dedication, individual skills...

 

Knowledge others do not know may also bring a trivial result towards independecne. Even if I was quantum mechanics master who constructs perpetum mobile I may only get energy- that others are getting already more naive natural way. Concerning those people to switch to my energy becouse it is "less consuming resources" is just trivial from their point of view to get dependant on my asset and compensate me.

 

Even if I was a chemistry master, I may only construct flawors, turn matter to other molecula matter by energy and so on. What still brings disaponting result towards independence of my very self. 

 

If one wants to be independent, he may create something that others would like and have himself compensated by them- this does not create independence, only a will of society to take care of you instead of you. If I wanted to travel around the world, I would not use car - I would depend on roads, gas and cars fragile mechanism. With horse I wouldt achieve this. I can even build a ship if I reach shore and board my horse on it. I will need to catch fish and so on.

 

A very good ability towards independence is ability to find things out, not to learn them from a teacher. This would be total independence, becouse you would not even need a teacher to gain knowledge.

 

One needs to get out the golden spoon from his ass if he wants to be independent, and not think how to overcome nature or duties of living with knowledge of some technical character. Celebrating how society is taking care of me instead of me, how to not work or move... you are just intensing up degradation of yourself. That is not independence. I give it like 200 years and humanity will go to extinction. We are wasting potential from ancestors, aplousing ourself doing it, thinking how to do it even "better and faster".  We already create gmo plants, forcing plants to have fruit while having impotent seed in it, ignoring behavioral abilities of plants- forcing plants to change their reproduction policy soon. And that means we will vanish, or , make nature vanish along with us, so even normal people will pay for our miserable selfisness and lazines. 

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