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Elkhai

Need advice with RPG making

14 posts in this topic

Well, I believe I shouldnt use this forum for my question since I have very low programming skills, but I couldnt find any other place for this question.
I have got idea of making RPG, 2D (or with very little 3D elements). It would love for it
to be something like famous android game "bard's tale", maybe more pixels related and I would love to make game on pc and maybe later transfer it to other platforms.
I have some piece of story and ideas written down, but I dont have any idea what to learn.. One my friend suggested me Java, but I am not sure if its capable of making that?
To put simple my question is: "Which programming languages are capable of making long rpg game on various devices?"
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Did you check out RPG Maker? It's a, well, tool to make RPG's. An example of a game that was made with RPG Maker is 'To The Moon.'

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Well thing is that I want to be programmer. I think game maker is for peoples whom are artists (not me) and I just want to do code things in game(s) I will make.. I am capable of learning something new thought :D
So feel free to reply some thoughts about what should I learn if I want to be game maker and my main concept is to make RPGs.
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I am thinking about java really much.. C++ was a bit too confusing for me so I threw it off my list what i'll learn first :-)
Maybe you can tell me any good tutorials books about java?
And I know that I wont start with RPG at first, that would be hm.. Overhelming :D
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You certainly *can* program in RPG maker -- I'm not sure about Java, but at least in Ruby and probably others. Languages that would be a transferable skill, not just something that only applies to RPG maker. You can program as much or as little as you like, really -- its just that the system already provides a lot of the typical RPG stuff.

 

If you want to become a programmer, that's a different goal, and one which starts a long, long way from having a finished RPG (or any game, really) to show for it. Using RPG maker would allow you the ability to see real results in your RPG sooner, and the opportunity to do some programming along the way. Even if your ultimate goal is to be a programmer, starting within RPG maker might still be a good option for you. Otherwise, start learning to program from scratch, but be prepared to work up from the very bottom.

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I am thinking about java really much.. C++ was a bit too confusing for me so I threw it off my list what i'll learn first :-)
Maybe you can tell me any good tutorials books about java?
And I know that I wont start with RPG at first, that would be hm.. Overhelming biggrin.png

Ok, Java. So I'm using a library called libGDX to make 2D Java games. I'm importing the libGDX projects into the Eclipse IDE. Once you learn the basics of programming this is where you might want to start as well.

 

I'd recommend a site like: http://www.learnjavaonline.org to get started. Using a web environment to jump into the code removes some of the complexity of a compiled language like Java. It covers the basics like control statements and basic data types and also some of the more advanced topics like inheritance and generics. It seems pretty light on content though so I would just try and run the programs and try to get a gist of how the language works. 

 

Once you're comfortable with that you will want to work with an IDE to compile your own programs on your computer and get an intro book like "Head First Java, 2nd Edition" from Amazon. Or even the Java Tutorial: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial.

 

After a couple of months you should be fairly comfortable in Java and you're chosen IDE. At that point you can start making games with the libGDX library here: http://libgdx.badlogicgames.com/documentation.html.

 

Good luck and remember to have fun. Starting a new language is always exciting for me. Try not to get too discouraged when you get stuck.

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All of the above posts are good as well, but I'd recommend DarkBASIC, which is a variant on BASIC created specially for the purposes of making games. It's not extremely tough to learn. Another engine which I think is even better is Unity3d, but that's not very well suited to 2d game development.

 

No matter what language you choose, however, you must start SMALL before you can do anything bigger. As with anything new, it takes time to master it completely. Good luck!

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It has been a while since I have seen anyone recommend Dark Basic.
Based on first hand experience, I will go against this recommendation however. There is hardly anything DB does better than Unity, and for a hobbyist, it will still cost you.
I would go with Unity, or as others have suggested, rpg maker. There is no shame in using the right tool for the right task.
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Need advice with RPG making


Don't.

You don't have the bandwidth, skill level, team size, money, or time to make an RPG. Those generally take teams of a hundred-plus professional game developers multiple years of full-time-plus work to make.

There's a reason you see so few indie RPGs and the few you do find are almost solely made by established RPG developmers.
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Need advice with RPG making


Don't.

You don't have the bandwidth, skill level, team size, money, or time to make an RPG. Those generally take teams of a hundred-plus professional game developers multiple years of full-time-plus work to make.

There's a reason you see so few indie RPGs and the few you do find are almost solely made by established RPG developmers.

 

 

 

Uh...  Markets are overflowing with indie RPGs...

 

I think you have to qualify both of these statements.  The first is very true if you try to compete with the AAA RPGs on content, although this is equally true in most game genres. The second of these statements is true if we're realistic about the scope of indie RPGs.

 

I would say, in general, that rather few 'indie' games provide more than about 10 hours of content unless they're either relying on procedural content, or are particularly well-funded and well-staffed for an "indie" studio. There are a few exceptions, but I'm hard-pressed to think of any who exceed the ~10 hour mark by double or more.

 

OP isn't going to compete with Bard's Tale on content or quality anytime soon -- not alone, or even in a small group; but a similarly styled game with with a more focused scope and reasonable expectations for content polish is doable alone or in a small group, if you have dedication and sufficient time.

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