• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
GameDesign14

Introducing Myself

4 posts in this topic

Hey everyone my name is Nate, i just signed up and i would like to introduce myself. I am new to the game design industry. I have really been wanting to do game design since my sophomore year of high school, i graduated in 2012, My Junior year i tested into a vocational class for graphic design but i did not like it because i was discouraged by everyone's drawing because theirs looked like real life people, but they were all kids that went to art schools. And so i dropped out of it the first week and went into a marine trades program for learning how to fix boats and i found welding. And i did really great with, actually i was really good at it and i loved welding and i was ready to get a job after high school. But the down side to it was needing a car to get to the welding warehouses which are not close to where i live so eventually i just got turned off by it. And i realized i was not to into welding anymore and its not what i really wanted from the start. So as time goes by i saw all these advertisements for these different colleges for game design. And well to make a long story short i began to download the different game design engines because i was interested in level design. But someone said that is a very rare position to find and not something you can really go to college. And that for level design you are either making models and importing them or programming stuff on the game engines. So i chose animation. I was like hey what do i have to lose why should i be discouraged because someone else's drawing is better because if i really want it everything will workout in the end. And the school i am going to everyone takes basic drawing classes in the beginning to make sure everyone is on the same page. I am a gamer to i love playing games competitively and thats one of the major reasons why i want to be a game designer, i want to bring multiplayer games to a new level and something unique someday. And i can't make any promises but hopefully i can achieve my dreams and get to where i want to be. And i hope everyone else gets to where they want to be in their game design adventure tobiggrin.png

 

So im due to go to college in October to learn animation. And its a great college to. They teach you from concept art to , animation, level design, and programming. Well There is my story on why i am here and look forward to be talking and working with you guys!smile.png

Edited by GameDesign14
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

to make a long story short i began to download the different game design engines because i was interested in level design. But someone said that is a very rare position to find and not something you can really go to college. And that for level design you are either making models and importing them or programming stuff on the game engines.


You were given untrue information. Level Design isn't rare, and college does help, and the job description you were given isn't entirely accurate either. Perhaps you should wander over to the Game Industry Job Advice forum and read the FAQs - and ask questions in that forum.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

to make a long story short i began to download the different game design engines because i was interested in level design. But someone said that is a very rare position to find and not something you can really go to college. And that for level design you are either making models and importing them or programming stuff on the game engines.


You were given untrue information. Level Design isn't rare, and college does help, and the job description you were given isn't entirely accurate either. Perhaps you should wander over to the Game Industry Job Advice forum and read the FAQs - and ask questions in that forum.

 

Ok i will check out the game industry job advice forums just to make my knowledge better  thanks, i appreciate it biggrin.png  

 

Im still going to be going to that college though. I am really satisfied with what they are going to teach me, and going to animation is great because i will not be tied to just the gaming industry if i cannot get in right away!

 

My courses throughout the 4 years are:

 

-game programming for the artist

-game modeling and animation

-level design

-game environment art

-materials and lighting

-game prototyping

-character sculpting

-game production team

-observational drawing

-design fundamentals

-language of animation and film

-digital painting techniques

-life drawing and gesture

-storyboarding

-2d animation principles

-3d modeling

-backround and character design

-digital editing and audio

-hard surface and organic modeling

-character modeling and rigging

-visual effects

 

And they do have the advanced training for these courses i just did not list them because its a waste of space!

Edited by GameDesign14
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0