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Lostrick

A team for beginner

13 posts in this topic

I've created mini games and I have some knowledge of programming language (not much)

so the question is, where can I find a team to work with? or should I create many games and study more until I become a pro then start looking for a team?

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where can I find a team to work with? 

You can first try to create/join a team in the classifieds part of this forum.
There is plenty other forums on the net where you can find your team, such as generalist forum on gamedev like this one, or forum dedicated to a particular engine (the Unity3D forum, the unreal engine forum, etc..)

 

should I create many games and study more until I become a pro then start looking for a team

 

Working in a team is double edged. In one hand you have more possibilities, especially if you have different skills in your team (artist, programmer, writer, etc...), and you also can gain a lot of experiences. It can also help you to land a job if you can show that you have experience working in team. But, in the other hand it's a lot more difficult working in a team than working alone. And without a proper organisation and self-discipline you won't be able to avoid the fail. Even if all the members are very good on what they do.

So the question is : Do you think you have the right skill to join/create a team? Both technical and organisational? In both case (joining/creating) you have to show what you can offer;

Anyway, it's always good to have some games to prove your worth.

Good luck

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but is it okay if a beginner like me join a team? I mean will there be anyone that want to recruit a beginner?

I've wanted to join a team and I've been looking at the posts at this forum but I don't meet the requirement that they state

Edited by Lostrick
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is it okay if a beginner like me join a team? I mean will there be anyone that want to recruit a beginner?

where can I find a team to work with?


Use the Classifieds. If they (teams in the Classifieds) won't take you, keep building your skills on your own until they will.

This topic doesn't fit neatly into any of our forums, so I'm moving it to the Lounge.
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Once again : Do you think you have the right skill to join/create a team?

If you, yoursef think you can't meet a project's requirement, then no you can't join this project. I don't think anyone is willing to hire someone who can't offer anything. ^^'

But, if you think that you can make it, try to contact them! They will surely tell you more about the project, ask you questions, and test you. And they will let you know if you are the one they are seeking for. It is as simple as that :D

If you are really beginning, I would advice you to start by working on projects alone. Try doing a pong, tic-tac-toe, and other simple game. And as you progress making those game you will better understand your limits and what you can do.

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You are willing to work for free for other people's project in order to learn. It's something very valuable, but the game development community knows from experience that the issue with people in your position is that many of them lack dedication and can't be trusted to stay with the project long enough to contribute something.

 

If you can somehow assure people of the fact that you are serious and can be trusted I'm sure many would be glad to have you onboard even if you don't meet the criteria of what they were primarily in need of.

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Once again : Do you think you have the right skill to join/create a team?

If you, yoursef think you can't meet a project's requirement, then no you can't join this project. I don't think anyone is willing to hire someone who can't offer anything. ^^'

But, if you think that you can make it, try to contact them! They will surely tell you more about the project, ask you questions, and test you. And they will let you know if you are the one they are seeking for. It is as simple as that biggrin.png

If you are really beginning, I would advice you to start by working on projects alone. Try doing a pong, tic-tac-toe, and other simple game. And as you progress making those game you will better understand your limits and what you can do.

I've created those games already, like tic-tac-toe, snake, etc, and I've created a simple topdown shooter multiplayer with java too. I don't know if that will be enough or not.

But I've never seen low requirements like that for a team

Should I just contact them and say that I can make mini games like that? I just thought it's nothing to be proud of

 

You are willing to work for free for other people's project in order to learn. It's something very valuable, but the game development community knows from experience that the issue with people in your position is that many of them lack dedication and can't be trusted to stay with the project long enough to contribute something.

 

If you can somehow assure people of the fact that you are serious and can be trusted I'm sure many would be glad to have you onboard even if you don't meet the criteria of what they were primarily in need of.

not paid isn't a problem for me, I'm not expecting anyone would pay for a beginner though.

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Should I just contact them and say that I can make mini games like that? I just thought it's nothing to be proud of

 

Come on have a little faith on yourself! ^^'

And yes, contact them if you want to join them. What do you have to lose? Many people happily engage conversation with other with the same passion (if you are polite enough ;) ) They is a huge probability that they are human like you ^^'

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From personal experience:

The most important thing at first is to get games done.

Joining a team at the current stage exposes you to the risks of working with a team that will never deliver (they don't do it on purpose, a lot of things can go wrong in production, especially on volunteer teams).

 

I would suggest that you make more games (pong clone, tetris clone, etc.) until you are more confident with your abilities.

Then, join a team that looks solid/serious. It will probably fail, but you'll be in a much better spot to learn from the experience.

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Should I just contact them and say that I can make mini games like that? I just thought it's nothing to be proud of

 

Come on have a little faith on yourself! ^^'

And yes, contact them if you want to join them. What do you have to lose? Many people happily engage conversation with other with the same passion (if you are polite enough ;) ) They is a huge probability that they are human like you ^^'

 

Ok i'll try it, thanks for your suggestions

 

From personal experience:

The most important thing at first is to get games done.

Joining a team at the current stage exposes you to the risks of working with a team that will never deliver (they don't do it on purpose, a lot of things can go wrong in production, especially on volunteer teams).

 

I would suggest that you make more games (pong clone, tetris clone, etc.) until you are more confident with your abilities.

Then, join a team that looks solid/serious. It will probably fail, but you'll be in a much better spot to learn from the experience.

I'm kinda bored of making mini games so I was going to try what it feels like in a team

but i'll make many more mini games in the mean time until i get a team

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If you're tired of minigames, make a slightly larger games (don't overshoot, you'll be surprised how complexity kicks in quickly).

Also, try to build the things the 'right way'. Nail down controls, build a good camera system even if you don't seem to need it, and then apply it.

For example, what would pong be if it had a proper camera and the ability to have camera shakers?

The upside to this is that these are systems you'll need to work with on larger team, so better be familiar with them asap.

Possibly, your assignment on the larger team would also be in that vein as well (something small/medium nearly independent from others, but nonetheless important).

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If you're tired of minigames, make a slightly larger games (don't overshoot, you'll be surprised how complexity kicks in quickly).

Also, try to build the things the 'right way'. Nail down controls, build a good camera system even if you don't seem to need it, and then apply it.

For example, what would pong be if it had a proper camera and the ability to have camera shakers?

The upside to this is that these are systems you'll need to work with on larger team, so better be familiar with them asap.

Possibly, your assignment on the larger team would also be in that vein as well (something small/medium nearly independent from others, but nonetheless important).

what do u mean a good camera system? Pong is a 2D game right?

you mean like making skills for pong, or some special effects?

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You're bored making mini games?
Start making "midi" games.
When you get bored doing that, start making "maxi" games.
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what do u mean a good camera system? Pong is a 2D game right?

 

That hurts :)

But yeah, believe it or not, Pong uses a 2d fixed orthogonal camera anyway!

Sure, you could directly change the Xs and Ys of every object directly, but if you differentiate the camera from movement logic, you'll probably learn something that becomes applicable in side-scrollers (and of course, more important in 3d games).

Also, a camera allows you to do effects without changing everything's Xs and Ys (such as shaking the camera!)

 


you mean like making skills for pong, or some special effects?

Sure, why not even upgrades? (larger paddles for 50 in-game money, or sticky balls?).

 

The more you mess around with game features, the more you learn.

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