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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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moeen k

how to manage project for multi platforms on engine based or graoundup project

4 posts in this topic

hi.

this may be a easy simple question but i dont know about it.

 

im starting a new project and i want to take output for ios android and pc. as a developer how should i think about my project?

should i work parallel ? for example when i implemented move forward for my character by up arrow for pc after that i implemnt touching a up arrow looking  sprite for android and ios or its better to focus on a certain platform and after taking last output for it start working for next platform? what is the best way? i think what professional teams do is they have diffrent team for each platforms and they work parallel but as a indie little team what is best way to do?

thank you for helping

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Where I work, its common to focus on one version first (iOS) and port it later (Android) but on some occurrences, we've worked on both at the same time.

Your code should be built in such a way that one platforms ignores the state of the other altogether so that not all builds break for unknown reasons. I'm assuming you are differentiating the 'device' at boot and use this stashed reference to handle controls, display, etc?

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While being vigilant and making sure all platforms are functional at once from the very beginning sounds great, this is often an unrealistic goal. Often for deadlines/deliverables/shows you will end up picking a target platform to present on. That platform will then end up being more developed than others. 
 
Imo it is good to get into the habit of making sure all platforms are at least buildable at all times, to avoid nasty surprises down the line when you find out that "Holy crap, the PS4/whatever code/data has been broken for months and now there's this giant mess of compile errors to detangle!". That, I think, is doable. But in terms of functionality and maintaining playability and stability of the game - unless you have QA resources (or personal time) to both test and fix each platform on a daily basis and build features at the same time you're likely to end up leaving some platforms by the wayside and coming back to them later.
 
One potential option to consider to mitigate this is automated testing. However, that's a whole other can of worms and requires plenty of initial work and ongoing maintenance in itself.
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I am not sure about mobile development practices, but in general for console games teams that want to develop on multiple platform simultaneously will have some kind of platform abstraction layer that handles the platform specific stuff (input, sound, graphics, file system, etc). Then the rest of the game code will interact with the abstraction layer, which will then do the correct thing for each platform. The vast majority of a game's code should be platform agnostic, and only lower level file, io, graphics, sound, etc code will have to be written for each platform.

 

This is pretty easy on consoles, because the major consoles are so similar to one another. On mobile things might be a lot different, given the massive variation in screen size and performance that there is in the mobile marketplace.

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