• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
malignant

Math related to 3D graphics.

3 posts in this topic

Hello, I'm currently a physics major but am thinking about changing to math with a minor in computer science.  I've always been interested in areas of computer science that required a lot of math such as cryptography but mainly computer graphics. The math degree is very lenient in the sense that I can pick most of the upper division courses. I tried googling which maths would be of the most use in computer science in general but usually the results I found were just "trig, linear algebra, calculus" etc which isn't what I'm looking for.  I'm posting in computer graphics because I figured this would be the most math-heavy programming section.

 

Currently for math I have calculus 1-3, linear algebra, differential equations, and a course in discrete math.

 

Here are my questions:(gear 3 and 4 towards computer graphics/simulations, I suppose):

 

1) Do different branches of computer science require vastly different branches of math or is it all similar?

 

2) For computer graphics/simulations.  Would I be better off doing math or physics for this assuming equal amount of programming for both?

 

3) A 2-semester sequence that I have to choose between is:

 

Survey of Multivariable Calculus (More advanced vector calculus, more max/min geometry stuff, complex functions etc)

and

Survey of Partial Differential Equations (Just all PDEs and orthogonal functions and stuff)

 

OR

 

Real Analysis 1

and

Real analysis 2

 

I'm not sure how useful the more advanced calculus stuff is compared to the proof based courses like Real Analysis. Any ideas?

 

4) Lastly, which of these undergrad courses are the most important?

 

Numerical Analysis 1 & 2

Combinatorics 1 & 2

Complex Variables 1 & 2

Topology 1 & 2

Game Theory
Cryptography

Another discrete math course

Advanced Linear Algebra (probably a lot of proofs)

Abstract Algebra

Probability Theory

Advanced Geometry (Hilbert postulates, Lobachevskian geometries etc)

Statistical inference

Theory of Numbers 1 & 2 (The Euclidean algorithm and unique factorization; arithmetical functions; congruences, reduced residue systems; primitive roots; certain diophantine equations.)

 

 

Correct me if I'm wrong but I'm thinking numerical analysis, combinatorics, and another discrete math should definitely be taken for any branch. But what else?

Edited by malignant
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2) For computer graphics/simulations. Would I be better off doing math or physics for this assuming equal amount of programming for both?

 

I might separate graphics from simulations. Because you posted here on gamedev, you may be considering more of a "real-time" graphics approach. If so, in the future, simulations, such as in biological/weather/medical/oceanography areas, will be required to more and more sophisticated and likely involve implementation of math and physics that's less closely related** to the graphical presentation of the results. Having said that, with what shaders might be like in the future, with massive parallel capability, there's likely to be a lot more work done in the GPU.

 

**e.g., diff-equations, field functions, fluid mechanics, etc.

 

With that in mind, you may want to through in a few courses in the life sciences in those areas, particularly those that deal with the processes involved.

 

EDIT: FYI, I majored in Engineering Physics for my Bachelor's degree, a solid mix of heavy physics stuff and engineering subjects. Transitioning from that background to computers (IMHO) would be much easier than vice-versa. Remember, a Bachelor's degree indicates the ability to learn, not detailed knowledge in a particular area.

Edited by Buckeye
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Truth is there's a good chance you'll use little of that in practice, but all of it is worth learning. Take the classes that interest you the most and research the rest on your own time. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You probably won't be able to directly apply advanced calculus or real analysis to a computer graphics problem, except when you are setting up the basic parameters of your algorithm.  It might be beneficial for you to see some of the rendering techniques that are implemented in modern GPUs, such as in the GPU Gems series (part 3 is here).  That will give you an idea of what kind of analysis is needed and used for designing an algorithm.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0