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Cozzmy13

Game Engine that will meet my requirements

24 posts in this topic

I am planning on making a PC game, which would be a great thing to spend what's still left of my summer holiday.

 

First,I need to say that I have no programming language knowledge whatsoever but I am willing to learn.

 

What I thought of is:

 

-a 2D top-down RPG game but with the ability of moving in ANY direction(most probably I will use only 8-directional sprites)

-map selection (there will be 2-3 different premade maps)

-character customization(I want to able to select from a few types of haircuts and skin color)(can be replaced with character selection)

-random items spawned in some areas of the map (example: I want items to spawn in a house, if the player takes all the items existing in that very house, they will be respawned in a specified amount of time.)

-random monsters (zombies that follow you when you get in their field of view and you lose them if you hide) spawned in some areas of the map(example: I want monsters to spawn only in towns, if the player kills 5 zombies from that town, those 5 zombies will be respawned in a specified amount of time)

-interaction with objects (example:I want to be able to cut a tree or mine some rocks to get resources)

-crafting (a 3x3 Minecraft-like grid and an adtional 1 slot for tools and/or fire)

-health, hunger and thirst bars

-vehicles (would be nice)

-portals

-multiplayer

-armor

-ranged weapons & guns (crossbows, bows, lever-action, pistols, rifles, stuff like that)

 

RED = Needed

GREEN= Optional

 

Thanks in advance to anyone who is willing to help.

 

English is not my native language, so yeah.

Edited by jbadams
Edited font colour to something more readable.
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What exactly do you want help with?  

 

So far you've just listed your ideas.  You need to ask questions if you want answers.

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All of this:

 


-a 2D top-down RPG game but with the ability of moving in ANY direction(most probably I will use only 8-directional sprites)
-map selection (there will be 2-3 different premade maps)
-character customization(I want to able to select from a few types of haircuts and skin color)(can be replaced with character selection)
-random items spawned in some areas of the map (example: I want items to spawn in a house, if the player takes all the items existing in that very house, they will be respawned in a specified amount of time.)
-random monsters (zombies that follow you when you get in their field of view and you lose them if you hide) spawned in some areas of the map(example: I want monsters to spawn only in towns, if the player kills 5 zombies from that town, those 5 zombies will be respawned in a specified amount of time)
-interaction with objects (example:I want to be able to cut a tree or mine some rocks to get resources)
-crafting (a 3x3 Minecraft-like grid and an adtional 1 slot for tools and/or fire)
-health, hunger and thirst bars
-vehicles (would be nice)
-portals
-multiplayer
-armor
-ranged weapons & guns (crossbows, bows, lever-action, pistols, rifles, stuff like that)

 

combined with this:

 


I am planning on making a PC game, which would be a great thing to spend what's still left of my summer holiday.

First,I need to say that I have no programming language knowledge whatsoever but I am willing to learn.

 

is a really tough hurdle.  While I know little about it having never used it, I'd imagine that RPGMaker would really be a way for you to go:

 

http://www.rpgmakerweb.com/

 

Again, I've never used it, but I'm willing to bet you'll have a blast with it. I think it looks like a fun tool.

 

You may also want to consider picking up titles like Neverwinter Nights (available for download here: http://www.gog.com/game/neverwinter_nights_diamond_edition and other places) which comes with a modding/design toolset to create your own scenarios and games.  You could have a really good time creating an RPG over your break and you'll likely learn quite a bit (it has a great modding a user-created content support structure).

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I would not recommend RPG Maker due to limitations on the actual engine itself. (Which I found out after a year working with it, and I ended up hacking my way through pretty everything). It's pretty hacky to get movement in eight directions, and it's difficult getting a real-time battle system, (much-less ranged attacks), and mouse-support along with adding multiplayer functionality is messy as well, too. It's also limited to Windows, so forget trying to add Linux or Mac support without a complete rewrite in a portable environment. Oh, and the performance is going to definitely drop when you add too many events on your maps. (I'm not bashing on RPG Maker, I'm just trying to tell you that it isn't for you.)

 

Start with something else, such as Unity, or Monogame (which both use C#). Of course these have much steeper learning curve than RPG Maker does, it's probably worth it in the end, and will yield better performance as well. It's not extremely hard for what you're doing, and it fits the job perfectly; You can port it to different platforms with much more ease.

Edited by Avilius
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Why does nobody ever recommended the Unreal Engine?

 

It has a while to go yet to compete with all the plugins and other support of Unity but the editor is totally cracking....

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Why does nobody ever recommended the Unreal Engine?

 

It has a while to go yet to compete with all the plugins and other support of Unity but the editor is totally cracking....

I actually was considering recommending it (especially me being a hardcore C++ extremist, I mean, it's a great engine), but it's really overkill for what he's trying to do.

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I have never seen a 2D game made with Unreal Engine.

 

I think I will go with Monogame and learn C# and XNA, anyone has links to some kind of pdf books to start learning?(I don't have the money to buy them.)

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I think you're underestimating the time requirement of learning to code which learning how to build a game, in addition to creating art for it. I think you should start with Flash, javascript is pretty easy to learn and it is more or less a graphical tool, where you can "draw" your game and start moving right away. You can post it up on newgrounds after you finish and anyone will be able to play it. It might require you to learn some html in the process as well, which is extremely easy, and this foundation of javascipt/html will be more useful then C# and C++, as most games nowdays are leaning towards browser gaming, so you'll be gaining valuable experience as a web developer if you want to persue this professionally.

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I think you're underestimating the time requirement of learning to code which learning how to build a game, in addition to creating art for it. I think you should start with Flash, javascript is pretty easy to learn and it is more or less a graphical tool, where you can "draw" your game and start moving right away. You can post it up on newgrounds after you finish and anyone will be able to play it. It might require you to learn some html in the process as well, which is extremely easy, and this foundation of javascipt/html will be more useful then C# and C++, as most games nowdays are leaning towards browser gaming, so you'll be gaining valuable experience as a web developer if you want to persue this professionally.

wat.

 

Can you cite sources?

 

I don't know much about the game, but I'm not 100 percent certain if Javascript is the right tool for the job. I don't see any real benefit of using it here based on the information given.

 

______________________

 

@The OP

 

You can't directly jump into programming games, you actually have to learn the target language, and know it well. It isn't that easy. 

 

Now I'm not the best C# programmer, so take my suggestions with a grain of salt.

 

First off you need an IDE. Visual Studio is the best one for C# in my opinion, so be sure to download that.

 

Next, you need tutorials. Microsoft has great C# tutorials, I recommend you start with them. 

http://rbwhitaker.wikidot.com/monogame-tutorials looks promising, and it seems to have a set of C# tutorials as well.

 

You shouldn't be looking to do anything game-related for at least a month or two, maybe even several months.

Edited by Avilius
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I think you're underestimating the time requirement of learning to code which learning how to build a game, in addition to creating art for it. I think you should start with Flash, javascript is pretty easy to learn and it is more or less a graphical tool, where you can "draw" your game and start moving right away. You can post it up on newgrounds after you finish and anyone will be able to play it. It might require you to learn some html in the process as well, which is extremely easy, and this foundation of javascipt/html will be more useful then C# and C++, as most games nowdays are leaning towards browser gaming, so you'll be gaining valuable experience as a web developer if you want to persue this professionally.

Maybe I am underestimating a bit the time required,on another note art creation is my  thing so that wouldn't be that hard.I will take your advice and learn Flash.

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you can use monogame don´t use xna becouse the xna is not be support

i recommend you use monogame

Edited by Landi20
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Why does nobody ever recommended the Unreal Engine?
 
It has a while to go yet to compete with all the plugins and other support of Unity but the editor is totally cracking....

I actually was considering recommending it (especially me being a hardcore C++ extremist, I mean, it's a great engine), but it's really overkill for what he's trying to do.

Why is it overkill, explain?

I have never seen a 2D game made with Unreal Engine.

I think I will go with Monogame and learn C# and XNA, anyone has links to some kind of pdf books to start learning?(I don't have the money to buy them.)


https://forums.unrealengine.com/showthread.php?814-newbie-question-i-can-do-create-2d-games-with-unreal-engine
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Why does nobody ever recommended the Unreal Engine?

 

It has a while to go yet to compete with all the plugins and other support of Unity but the editor is totally cracking....

I actually was considering recommending it (especially me being a hardcore C++ extremist, I mean, it's a great engine), but it's really overkill for what he's trying to do.

 

Why is it overkill, explain?

 

I agree that Unreal Engine is a little overkill. Based on what the OP want to do and what he said about his experience, I would not recommend this engine. Make no mistake, I really like this engine, and it is possible to do a top down with it. But I don't think this is the best choice.

The Unreal Engine is an "heavy engine". And for a first experience in video game development I would recommend a more friendly engine. The main reason are, in my opinion :

- Not always friendly user
- The C++ is not the easiest of the language
- You'll have to "plug" yourself to existing code (from the engine)
- Except if you have a badass computer, the compilation time + having to relaunch the editor between each change can be annoying.
- Not traditionnaly used for 2D top down rpg

But, I guess that is should be possible to create a top down 2dyou want only using the blueprint system.But once again I would recommend more friendly tools.

RPG Maker, or GameMaker, as many people said are good choices for starter, and when you have the basics, you could switch to other language/engine.
The combo html/javascript is also nice, due to its relatively easy learning curve.

Or, if you want to do true code (tongue.png) go with C\C++ and SDL\SFML 

 


as most games nowdays are leaning towards browser gaming,


I also request some source for this affirmation biggrin.png

Edit : because learngin

Edited by Navezof
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Why does nobody ever recommended the Unreal Engine?

 

I didn't suggest it because I've never seen a 2D RPG game with the "Powered by UNREAL ENGINE 4" logo.

 

Right tool for the job kinda thing.

 

Also, if you read the OP, he wants to work on this with what's left of summer holiday.  Debating the pros and cons of 3D engines ain't gonna get the project made in that timeframe. 

 


RPG Maker, or GameMaker, as many people said are good choices for starter, and when you have the basics, you could switch to other language/engine.
The combo html/javascript is also nice, due to its relatively easy learngin curve.

 

Seriously, Cozzmy -- just give this a try.  Summer's wastin'!  You can always revisit those ideas in any number of 3D engines when you again have free time.  Make something fun!

Edited by GoCatGo
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as most games nowdays are leaning towards browser gaming,


I also request some source for this affirmation biggrin.png
 

 

 

Didn't thing you guys would disagree with this, so don't really have any "sources". I more or less meant to hint at the fact that most companies are hiring people with experience in web-centered games, using javascript, c#, html etc. It's just something I found as a new graduate In the futile process of looking for a CS job (poor me lol). I kind of wish I didn't specialize in C++/graphics from the get-go and went into html and javascript instead, as now I have to learn it and it's booring as fudge after learning a very low level language. Just my h.o feel free to disagree.

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...snip...

Maybe I am underestimating a bit the time required,on another note art creation is my  thing so that wouldn't be that hard.I will take your advice and learn Flash.


even with unity, unreal engine, rpgmaker, flash actionscript, etc. everything you've talked about is years worth of knowledge you'd have to gain to make something you are envisioning. however if you are very good with art, it might be better to find someone who can program, while you do the artwork. this can be a ton of work, as usually a programmer can approach an artist more easily than an artist can approach a programmer, but it's something that can be done with a good bit of effort.

start making out the concept art of what you want to do, and building the details on what you want to do, with this in tow, you might be able to find someone willing to share your vision. but to do it yourself is going to require ALOT of learning, that far exceeds anything you'll accomplish in a single summer. Edited by slicer4ever
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...snip...

Maybe I am underestimating a bit the time required,on another note art creation is my  thing so that wouldn't be that hard.I will take your advice and learn Flash.

 


even with unity, unreal engine, rpgmaker, flash actionscript, etc. everything you've talked about is years worth of knowledge you'd have to gain to make something you are envisioning. however if you are very good with art, it might be better to find someone who can program, while you do the artwork. this can be a ton of work, as usually a programmer can approach an artist more easily than an artist can approach a programmer, but it's something that can be done with a good bit of effort.

start making out the concept art of what you want to do, and building the details on what you want to do, with this in tow, you might be able to find someone willing to share your vision. but to do it yourself is going to require ALOT of learning, that far exceeds anything you'll accomplish in a single summer.

 

 

That's a little bit of an exhaduration, with so many easy platforms to start off with with, a basic prototype rpg can be created in a matter of hours. Everything he mentioned except for multiplayer is entirely do-able. Take for instance PyGame, you can create the code for your game really fast, but the art still has to be dealt with, and it's not exactly very fast or portable.

 

I recommended Flash because it's an extremely useful tool for intro game design. OP can dive right into it especially if he's more oriented, Ability to draw your object right on the canvas, animate it and put it in the background without even touching code. But when that time comes code is _extremely_ simple and you will understand what's going on without any prior knowledge. And lastly the ability to publish right away, which is an incentive on it's own as it kind of boosts your interests if you are potentially offered number one spot on newgrounds, which could bring a programmer from a nobody to a celebrity in a matter of days, is in itself worth it.

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I guess I made my choice, I will learn C#(I already started) and in the meantime I will make the artwork for my game.

I must thank you all, because without your help, I would still be sitting in front of the computer thinking of what to do :P

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That's a little bit of an exhaduration, with so many easy platforms to start off with with, a basic prototype rpg can be created in a matter of hours. Everything he mentioned except for multiplayer is entirely do-able. Take for instance PyGame, you can create the code for your game really fast, but the art still has to be dealt with, and it's not exactly very fast or portable.

do you even remember what it was like when you first started? i mean, the very first days you began programming? how long did it take you to make something that was even kinda a game? the only tool he might be able to use to make this is rpg maker, any programming language he uses is going to require him to learn how to program to do any of the things he wants to do. and i know it took me a long time before i was even able to make a semi-decent game, yet alone a full on rpg.

I recommended Flash because it's an extremely useful tool for intro game design. OP can dive right into it especially if he's more oriented, Ability to draw your object right on the canvas, animate it and put it in the background without even touching code. But when that time comes code is _extremely_ simple and you will understand what's going on without any prior knowledge.



flash is a great tool(and was the language i personally first started out in), but it's also a massive potential pitfall because of the fact that you can draw/put stuff right on the screen, this means it's very very easy to do things in an inefficient manner, and give yourself major headaches down the road when you rely on things being placed in the world, instead of spawned via code.
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flash is a great tool(and was the language i personally first started out in), but it's also a massive potential pitfall because of the fact that you can draw/put stuff right on the screen, this means it's very very easy to do things in an inefficient manner, and give yourself major headaches down the road when you rely on things being placed in the world, instead of spawned via code.

 

Sure, it's not hard to get something on the screen, but I've never actually seen a commercial game written in Flash. Correct me if I'm wrong.
 

Didn't thing you guys would disagree with this, so don't really have any "sources". I more or less meant to hint at the fact that most companies are hiring people with experience in web-centered games, using javascript, c#, html etc. It's just something I found as a new graduate In the futile process of looking for a CS job (poor me lol). I kind of wish I didn't specialize in C++/graphics from the get-go and went into html and javascript instead, as now I have to learn it and it's booring as fudge after learning a very low level language. Just my h.o feel free to disagree.

 

What? Where are you looking for a job? The amount of browser-games are relatively small compared to mobile games or PC/console games.

Edited by Avilius
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flash is a great tool(and was the language i personally first started out in), but it's also a massive potential pitfall because of the fact that you can draw/put stuff right on the screen, this means it's very very easy to do things in an inefficient manner, and give yourself major headaches down the road when you rely on things being placed in the world, instead of spawned via code.

Sure, it's not hard to get something on the screen, but I've never actually seen a commercial game written in Flash. Correct me if I'm wrong.


with adobe Air, you're more common to find flash games on the mobile markets, then on the desktop. i'm sure their have been a few over the years, as it's not a bad environment for 2D games, but i can't give you any names off hand.
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The amount of browser-games are relatively small compared to mobile games or PC/console games.

 

I have to (sadly) take issue with that - you seem to be forgetting about the endless line of new "casual" mobile games.  Maybe consoles help to even the count but for games currently in development, I'd be surprised if mobile wasn't in the lead (again, sadly).  But I don't have any inside knowledge, it's just a guess which could be wrong.  As far as a job I guess the question is, what type of game development are you interested in?

 

Also - Adobe AIR is great-- although I'm not interested in the type of games typically on that platform.

Edited by Tebriel
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The amount of browser-games are relatively small compared to mobile games or PC/console games.

 

I have to (sadly) take issue with that - you seem to be forgetting about the endless line of new "casual" mobile games.  Maybe consoles help to even the count but for games currently in development, I'd be surprised if mobile wasn't in the lead (again, sadly).  

I'm not sure I fully understand what you're saying.

 

I'm trying to say that browser-based games take up a pretty small percentage of PC-games. (Again, if I see sources disproving what I'm saying I will gladly retract this statement.

 

As far as a job I guess the question is, what type of game development are you interested in?

 

 

Is that directed toward me, or was that an unfinished sentence?

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flash is a great tool(and was the language i personally first started out in), but it's also a massive potential pitfall because of the fact that you can draw/put stuff right on the screen, this means it's very very easy to do things in an inefficient manner, and give yourself major headaches down the road when you rely on things being placed in the world, instead of spawned via code.

Sure, it's not hard to get something on the screen, but I've never actually seen a commercial game written in Flash. Correct me if I'm wrong.
 

Didn't thing you guys would disagree with this, so don't really have any "sources". I more or less meant to hint at the fact that most companies are hiring people with experience in web-centered games, using javascript, c#, html etc. It's just something I found as a new graduate In the futile process of looking for a CS job (poor me lol). I kind of wish I didn't specialize in C++/graphics from the get-go and went into html and javascript instead, as now I have to learn it and it's booring as fudge after learning a very low level language. Just my h.o feel free to disagree.

What? Where are you looking for a job? The amount of browser-games are relatively small compared to mobile games or PC/console games.


There are thousands of commercial flash/air games on kongregate (most use micro transactions there) and there is a handful on steam and gog for purchase aswell.

As for the companies hiring programmers with C# experience, thats most likely for tools or mobile games (Unity3D has gained insane amounts of marketshare on mobile and the mobile market is almost insane), Even AAA games have partially moved over to higher level languages like C#, Python, Lua etc for things like tools, gameplay and general scripting, outside the games industry its pretty much all about C#, Java, Objective-C, Python, Javascript and unfortunatly also PHP, finding a entry level C++ job outside the games industry is getting increasingly difficult. Edited by SimonForsman
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