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bhollower

Passing Objects

6 posts in this topic

Right now I have many different objects, many of which rely on several other objects to operate. I have a graphics library wrapper, sprite, button, collision, heads up display and many other classes. I'm thinking about breaking it up even further to specialized classes but I'm thinking to myself, will I have to pass a hundred objects into each class? For instance, a button class requires the graphics library, event manager, sound manager, its x and y position, width height, filepath etc... My constructors are getting longer and longer! Is there a better way to manage my code? Maybe some sort of manager class that holds all of the above that I can pass to each object? Or is that bad practice because I'm giving all of the dependent classes too much access to other parts of the game? What's the right way to do this? Any help would be much appreciated, thank you!

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Apparently, I was wrong. I retract my statement. 

Edited by superman3275
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How would you know if it's coupled?

It was described:

 


For instance, a button class requires the graphics library, event manager, sound manager, its x and y position, width height, filepath etc...

This is a classic highly coupled design.

 

Some more reading which might help, the SOLID object oriented principles from "objectmentor":

Edited by rip-off
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Some coupling is good - but only where it makes sense to have it : the articles suggested by Rip-off should help differentiate.

 

You mention having "event manager" - One way to reduce coupling between your button and your sound manager could be to leverage your event system and use it for triggering your sound effect by just sending a "pressed" event along with the sound effect to play : If the button is already hooked up to trigger a particular event in the game, why not have the sound manager (or something along the lines of a UI sound manager ) listen for it as well?

 

Similarly, you could rework your code such that a button is merely a data structure with position, dimensions, sound effect names, trigger, etc. and have higher level components such as a UIRenderer go through the list/hierarchy of UI elements and render them as required - some benefits of this would be :

 

  • No more coupling between the rendering/visuals & your UI elements
  • Ability to write your UIRenderer and substitute it for a different implementation later on if your requirements change - it would also make it easier to ensure visual consistency throughout your interface.
  • Ability to batch render UI elements & display them in a coherent way : eg. you place a button that is too big to fit inside a frame and have to clamp it. Another example would be managing dynamic layouts without having to manually change the position/scale of your UI elements.

Hope this helps a bit?

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