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Which topics (languages, engines and other things) are being taught in top game programming institutes to make someone industry ready?

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I'm currently a computer science student on my 5th semester, want to be a game programmer and get a job in a top AAA company. I know i'm far away from that , but i just want to develop myself as a good game developer, so i wanna know what are the things being taught in top institutes. I know c/c++, java. how should i progress. Currently i'm learning Unity. Should i learn directx, opengl next.Thanks a lot..

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I am far from the right guy to answer this question but with the CS Degree you seem to be working on and you obviously engaging in learning Game Dev related stuff in your free time you seem to be pretty much on track.

 

A lot of people will tell you to start building games/engines/game related systems, so you have something to show after finishing your degree.

 

How to do that -> see GoCatGo's comment.

Edited by Gian-Reto

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Is there such a thing as a "Top Game Programming Institute"?

 

 

DigiPen, maybe?  In which case, the answer would be C/C++, as that's their focus.  I think that goes for Full Sail as well.  But I'd give the same answer for "What languages do AAA developers use", as it's pretty much C++ all the time.  At least for consoles and PC, with maybe a bonus for knowing some scripting languages and/or C#.

 

EDIT: Open GL or DirectX, doesn't really matter, just make games.  AAA games have many programmers, graphics, AI, UI, gameplay, networking, etc.  Concentrate on an area you want to specialize in, make sure that portion of the game is great and or novel.

Edited by ferrous

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I think that goes for Full Sail as well.

 

I think we have very different ideas of what constitutes a top educational program.

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It is the person, not the school, that makes the difference.

 

College and university graduates are entry level game developers.  

 

Even the "top educational program" graduates start out with an entry level job.  They may have some additional knowledge and skills that are useful in some circumstances and may be given a job requiring a year or two of experience, but really that is nothing. 

 

That is a 1-2 year acceleration off your 40+ year career.

 

Once you have a few years of experience under your belt you should be able to pick up any topic fairly quickly. Over your career you will be expected to re-invent yourself multiple times. You will be expected to learn about all kinds of new technologies and do it on your own time. If you don't, you will find yourself passed by or limited in growth as the next round of technology comes around.

 

 

Learn algorithms and data structures, since they are the core of programming. Learn about all forms of communication, as that has been a core growth topic for twenty years. Learn about any other topics that interest you, like data storage, graphics, tools, computer human interaction theory, compiler theory, computing theory, and whatever else makes you excited. Then keep learning.

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Is there such a thing as a "Top Game Programming Institute"?


There is, but is that really what's best for everyone? No - location, cost, skills, passion - these things all vary per person.

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Yeah, a person can get out what they put in, but, call me an elitist, some places are just over-priced degree mills.  None of this is really on topic, so I'll leave it at that.

Edited by GoCatGo

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