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What is the best IDE to use to start learning python on? I have about 7 languages on my belt and I need to start learning python 3, what IDE should I use?

Edited by 4mad3u5

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first i want to say: Just like programming languages, it doesn't really matter which IDE you use, as long as you are comfortable with it. 

 

I find the one which comes with the python download of this site (https://www.python.org/downloads/) good. (It's called IDLE (python GUI).

if you are learning i think it will be a clear IDE with for example the use of different colours for different things.

 

p.s. It's a long time ago since i downloaded it, so if you are interested, but the site i gave wasn't the right one i'm so sorry, and then you can search on google for IDLE (pythons GUI)

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Just like programming languages, it doesn't really matter which IDE you use, as long as you are comfortable with it.


Not really the case. IDEs include compilers which may or may not differ. If they differ then it matters a lot.

For example MS Visual Studio 2013 would produce greatly optimised and efficiently compiled code compared to say code::blocks. This probably doesn't apply to python IDEs since it's an interpreted language, but it's something to keep in mind when considering other languages.

 

 

You sorry you are completely right ofcourse.

I thought only about the whole interface aspect, but thanks for the correction.

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The best IDE for python is (in my opinion)... wait for it... Microsoft Visual Studio with the python tools addin. Short of that, Eclipse along with the PyDEV plugin is decent.

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Not really the case. IDEs include compilers which may or may not differ. If they differ then it matters a lot.

 

 

IDEs do not always include compilers. Python IDEs in particular do not (as you note), since Python is interpreted, and toolsets that work with or extend Python often simply use your installed version of Python (or have the option to, in addition to a built-in version).\

 

What is the best IDE to use to start learning python on?

 

Personally I use vim for all my Python work. You can pretty easily just use your favorite text editor to get started -- if you have seven languages under your belt you should have already developed a favorite. Then maybe try out all the IDEs you can find and pick one that suits you the best.

Edited by Josh Petrie

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Pythonista (iPad app)
Editorial (iPad app)

I am using editorial to practice my Python skills.

So far I have made about 70 extensions to Editorial, and a few use a little bit of Python, as well as html, CSS, JavaScript, and regular expressions.

I promise these are the best ways to practice, if you have any type of Apple device. You can do it on the go.

I started with IDLE myself on windows though.

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For example MS Visual Studio 2013 would produce greatly optimised and efficiently compiled code compared to say code::blocks.

This isn't true, MS Visual Studio 2013 are just IDE's, not Compilers. Code::Blocks will use whatever compiler you tell it to. IDE's don't include Compilers. (Also, I accidentally upvoted you while trying to downvote you, so that's why you got upvoted).

I promise these are the best ways to practice, if you have any type of Apple device.

He's asking for the best Python IDE"s, not for random ipad apps which you can write Python in.

 

I think the best beginning IDE is Sublime Text, because it's fast, extensible, and wrote in Python itself (not to mention that it looks great).

Edited by superman3275

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Pythonista IS an IDE. Not just a random app. 

It's a random app. The OP wants an IDE he can write code on from his computer, not an Ipad app (even if you think it's an IDE).

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Like smr, I've had good luck with Python Tools for VS2013. Despite the fact that the Express version of Visual Studio historically has not allowed plugins, PTVS 2.1 beta 2 installs even in the Express edition, which is pretty sweet.

It seems fairly happy to use whatever kind of python distribution you pair it with (I used Anaconda). It's got integration with pip and easy_install if you need to install other packages. It has a pretty convenient virtual environment management system as well.

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I'd recommend using a minimalistic IDE such as Geany, without all the bloat necessary for big projects but that just stand in the way when learning.

If you'd rather use a Python specialized one, DrPython looks convenient enough.

 

For example MS Visual Studio 2013 would produce greatly optimised and efficiently compiled code compared to say code::blocks.

You are mistaking IDE for compiler.

It is possible, as an example, to configure code::blocks to use the visual studio 2013 compiler. The opposite is also true, configure visual studio to compile with MinGW.

Edited by dejaime

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At work most of us use PyCharm. Those that don't tend to use vim.

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Like smr, I've had good luck with Python Tools for VS2013. Despite the fact that the Express version of Visual Studio historically has not allowed plugins, PTVS 2.1 beta 2 installs even in the Express edition, which is pretty sweet.

It seems fairly happy to use whatever kind of python distribution you pair it with (I used Anaconda). It's got integration with pip and easy_install if you need to install other packages. It has a pretty convenient virtual environment management system as well.

I like PTVS for big projects, but for someone learning Python it will be a bit much.

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Like smr, I've had good luck with Python Tools for VS2013. Despite the fact that the Express version of Visual Studio historically has not allowed plugins, PTVS 2.1 beta 2 installs even in the Express edition, which is pretty sweet.

It seems fairly happy to use whatever kind of python distribution you pair it with (I used Anaconda). It's got integration with pip and easy_install if you need to install other packages. It has a pretty convenient virtual environment management system as well.

I like PTVS for big projects, but for someone learning Python it will be a bit much.


It's what I started using when I started learning python. The OP says he's got 7 languages under his belt already, so I assume he can learn quickly smile.png It only took me a day to get up to speed with it. Edited by Nypyren

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Like smr, I've had good luck with Python Tools for VS2013. Despite the fact that the Express version of Visual Studio historically has not allowed plugins, PTVS 2.1 beta 2 installs even in the Express edition, which is pretty sweet.

It seems fairly happy to use whatever kind of python distribution you pair it with (I used Anaconda). It's got integration with pip and easy_install if you need to install other packages. It has a pretty convenient virtual environment management system as well.

I like PTVS for big projects, but for someone learning Python it will be a bit much.

 


It's what I started using when I started learning python. The OP says he's got 7 languages under his belt already, so I assume he can learn quickly smile.png It only took me a day to get up to speed with it.

 

To each his own I guess :).

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There is no international law against bundling an IDE with a compiler, so naturally there are some who do that. Microsoft's Visual Studio traditionally comes with a compiler, as does/did Borland's Delphi or Atmel's AVR Studio. Most IDEs however don't come with their own compiler, such as QtCreator, Eclipse and yes CodeBlocks.

 

Even when an IDE is bundled with an Compiler, the compiler toolchain are always seperate executables, so that they can be used without the IDE. This also holds for Visual Studio. So any IDE with a reasonably flexible compiler invokation backend can use any compiler toolchain, even if that toolchain comes bundled with a different IDE.

 

You can configure Codeblocks to use the Visual Studio compiler, or the latex compiler for that matter.

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I'd download latest Eclipse runtime (if you google around for "Eclipse luna runtime" you get links to 4.4 runtime), its 60Mb and has nothing but the barebones Eclipse runtime (no JDT nor additional bs). 

 

Then you install PyDev Eclipse plugin through "Install New Software" as PyDev's site instruction says. That way you can get a pretty slim Eclipse install only for Python development (mine is 100Mb fully installed).

 

Then install additional stuff as needed (say, MercurialEclipse or EGit if you need them).

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If you're planning on coding in different languages in the future I'd suggest learning an editor instead of an IDE. You'll kill 2 birds with one stone. VIM is cross-platform and Notepad++ is a good Windows editor. Both are free for personal use and I've used both to write code for Python, JavaScript, and PL/SQL.

 

Whatever you do, get good at using at least one editor. You'll use it a LOT in your development career.

Edited by tp9

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What is the best IDE to use to start learning python on? I have about 7 languages on my belt and I need to start learning python 3, what IDE should I use?

 

if you feel comfortable with Visual Studio, you can install Python Tools (works with both CPython and IronPython intepreters). Note also that express editions (Desktop and Web) are also supported: https://pytools.codeplex.com/wikipage?title=PTVS%20Installation

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