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The Most Dangerous Game (Concept)

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(GENERAL CONCEPT) Bonus screenshot from one day of working on models, untextured. http://prntscr.com/48dblg

 

 

After a class war in the near future, the poorest of society are methodically selected to be used as objects for hunting. They are known as Game, and are selected to be hunted for the enjoyment of others. Game Hunting is offered as a leisure activity in resorts, country clubs, and more. There are two types of Game Hunting excursions. A fight to the death, in which the hunt does not end until all of the Game, (and rarely the hunters) are dead. In the escape version of the hunt, the game ends when the Game have either escaped the Hunting Preserve, or the hunters have eliminated the Game. When hunting, hunters are forced to sign a contract, saying that there is a risk in them hunting. Game is able to fight back, and is given a knife, but that is mostly to soothe the conscience of the hunters. Very rarely has Game survived in either type of hunting excursion. If Game does manage to survive, they are freed, and taken permanently out of the Game selection lottery.

 

In the game, you are assigned to either be a hunter, or Game. The game is set over a wide variety of locations, from Game hunting resorts in the African Savannah, to airship cruises where Game hunting is offered as a leisure activity, to private Game hunting clubs in skyscrapers.

 

If a player is assigned to the Game team, they are given a knife, and tasked with either escaping the playing field, or killing the hunters. The Game have several advantages over the hunters. They can run faster, are more silent, can fit themselves into small spaces such as air vents for easy escapes, and can climb walls and other objects.

 

If a player is placed on the hunting team, they will be supplied with a large variety of weapons from classic WWI era carbines, to ultra modern machine guns. (Damage will be realistic, as in, one shot to the head will most likely be a kill, one shot to the stomach may be a kill, and shots to the appendages of foes will slow them down accordingly. For example, if Game finds an old hunting rifle, and shoots a hunter in the arm with it, the hunter will begin to bleed out, and must bandage themselves. If the damage is great enough, they will not be able  to use that arm, making them switch their weapons to the other arm, and causing them to lose accuracy. If someone is shot in the leg, they will limp, or worse. Players can drag other players to safety, and heal them for the time being.) Hunters will have some disadvantages as well. They will be slower than the Game, and will not be able to fit in as tight spaces with their bulky armor. They will also be loud, and can be detected by the game.

 

This is about what I have so far after about two days of planning. I will be making the game art, levels, and any other visual based game asset. My team partner will be coding, and working on online playability. We will be creating the game in the Unity Pro Engine, and will be coding the game in C#. Other tools being used include, Blender for modeling, several Terrain generation tools, Photoshop and Allegorithmic’s Indie Texturing Suite for textures, and RakNet for online functions. (Not final.)

 

Any feedback is appreciated thanks!

 

 

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So like a dystopian version of the short story? You should make sure you aren't infringing on any rights to the title and concept. For the most part it sounds like it could be fun, but you need to do more thinking about all of the systems you will have in place and how they work. Also it doesn't really make sense for the hunters to wear armor if the Game only have a knife. Even if they did have more than a knife, the hunters should give off more of a sportsman feel and just wear traditional hunting clothes. Just saying.

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I do recommend to use the word "prey" instead of "game" when referring to the hunted though.

That is probably intentional, although I don't think it's a wise choice because of possibly infringing author's rights.

 

The Most Dangerous Game is the well-known title of a book (which by the way is not in the public domain) and a film based on that book, as well as a few adaptations and over a dozen parodies. It is used as verbatim quote referring to "hunting men" in a Simpsons episode (Children of a Lesser Clod) and in one recent Miami-based US crime series (so either Dexter, or CSI Miami, I forgot which...), as well as in an episode of the 1970s "Hulk" series with Bill Bixby, if I recall correctly. That one involved a guy using a crossbow with poisoned arrows, or something.

 

Not sure if it's used as verbatim quote in "Surviving the Game" (1990s trash movie adaption of The Most Dangerous Game with Ice-T as homeless), but I'd be inlined to believe that as well.

Edited by samoth
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There have been dozens movies, books, games and other media with similar stories, i highly doubt there is anyone with a strong claim to this story/these strories.

My suggestion was made because when making a game and then be talking about the game but actually be talking about something different, it gets confusing.

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They make everyone read the story in grade school, which is why it works so well as a Simpsons joke.  Everyone knows it, everyone gets it.  The idea of hunting people for sport, however, is not exactly trademarked, so even if you get the idea from a specific work of fiction, your dystopian future man-hunting sport is probably safe in terms of litigation, since it would take an all-star team of Running Man/Most Dangerous Game/Hunger Games/Predator/Crysis/Ice-T lawyers to stand shoulder to shoulder and sue you instead of each other.

 

It's a good idea, but it's really just an asymmetrical adversarial gametype.  You can do a lot with it, but don't let yourself believe that the idea will be good all by itself.

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There have been dozens movies, books, games and other media with similar stories, i highly doubt there is anyone with a strong claim to this story/these strories.

No doubt there. My point was about the title, the exact wording of "The Most Dangerous Game" (which is also the exact wording used in those many movie references, but in that case it probably counts as quotation).

 

You can make an "Indiana Jones type" of movie and call it "Quatermain and the Lost City of Gold", no problem. Mr. Lucas doesn't exclusively own the rights to "guy with hat beats up Nazis and finds long-lost treasure".

 

But you wouldn't want to call your movie Indiana Jones. Nor would you want to call it Raiders of the Lost Bark, or Quatermain and the Temple of Doom, unless it's either a slapstick parody, or you unless don't care about getting in a dispute.

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best reference you can get is either from the movie: "Predator" or the "Sir you are being Hunted" Vgame.

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