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So there´s cheap 48 hour course nearby for C programming

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So my country authorities hold these learning courses (from knitting to jewelry crafting to programming, all kinds of stuff) for adults of all ages in masses once a year, and there´s cheap 48 hour (2-3 months) course for "C language" among them...

 

I´m not asking that typical stupid question "is it best language?" I´m just asking is it useful language to know for making 2D games.

 

I´ve learned Actionscript 3 and done few small games with it, I liked it, but I´d like to learn something more indepth and useful, with which I could make bigger and better 2D games with far fever limitations.

 

I´m probably never gonna work for AAA or big studios, just solo and maybe with few friends.

 

 

So, it´s cheap course with two sections, one for beginners (24h), second more indepth (another 24h). Should I go for it?

Edited by Norwyn

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Hard to say. The course can teach you nothing you won't find on the internet, but some people seem to benefit from having a person explain the basics of something to them face to face in order that they can then branch off and research on their own.

 

I'd be slightly concerned that someone is offering C as a beginner's language in 2014 though. Suspect they are offering what they know rather than what is most appropriate.

 

Of course you can make 2D games in C, but it wouldn't be the language I would suggest for that given the wealth of easier alternatives that exist. AS3 is a perfectly good example. What exactly are the limitations you are finding with that?

 

Well, now I see I worded it wrong, I didn´t mean it as "beginner", more like "basics of C language".

 

I´ve started to notice that bigger I make the game, more it takes to publish it with all the movieclips and whatnot. I´ve read that binding of Isaac had few similar problems with flash publishing times, flash crashing midway through (I´m using CS5), which is part that the dev has moved away from AS3 for his next project.

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Hard to say. The course can teach you nothing you won't find on the internet, but some people seem to benefit from having a person explain the basics of something to them face to face in order that they can then branch off and research on their own.

 

I'd be slightly concerned that someone is offering C as a beginner's language in 2014 though. Suspect they are offering what they know rather than what is most appropriate.

 

Of course you can make 2D games in C, but it wouldn't be the language I would suggest for that given the wealth of easier alternatives that exist. AS3 is a perfectly good example. What exactly are the limitations you are finding with that?

 

Well, now I see I worded it wrong, I didn´t mean it as "beginner", more like "basics of C language".

 

I´ve started to notice that bigger I make the game, more it takes to publish it with all the movieclips and whatnot. I´ve read that binding of Isaac had few similar problems with flash publishing times, flash crashing midway through (I´m using CS5), which is part that the dev has moved away from AS3 for his next project.

 

 

That's fair enough. Nothing wrong with learning C, its how I started a lot of years ago and I personally found it really helped me get into C++, although I had to unlearn a lot of stuff too. Some people have found a C heritage to be a hindrance when learning C++ and prefer to start with C++ first.

 

End of the day, all knowledge is useful and C is a great language if you are interested in the mechanics of how a compiler turns human readable code into machine code as it evolved from a sort of portable assembler (BCPL) and so is very close to "the metal" in as much as anything is in a modern OS environment (i.e. not very).

 

If its cheap and it gives you access to a person face to face who has some skills, give it a whirl.

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That's fair enough. Nothing wrong with learning C, its how I started a lot of years ago and I personally found it really helped me get into C++, although I had to unlearn a lot of stuff too. Some people have found a C heritage to be a hindrance when learning C++ and prefer to start with C++ first.


Just out of curiosity, what [type of] stuff did you have to unlearn from C when moving to C++?

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That's fair enough. Nothing wrong with learning C, its how I started a lot of years ago and I personally found it really helped me get into C++, although I had to unlearn a lot of stuff too. Some people have found a C heritage to be a hindrance when learning C++ and prefer to start with C++ first.


Just out of curiosity, what [type of] stuff did you have to unlearn from C when moving to C++?

 

 

Mainly stuff related to type safety, like casting a structure to void pointer to pass it around in a generic way, or using (c-style*)casts on things. I mean the stuff that still works in a C++ environment but isn't desirable. I guess this is the kind of thing some people prefer to have never learned in the first place when tackling C++, not sure.

 

The obvious things like not declaring variables at the top of functions but at point of first use are probably not worth mentioning. Not relevant in C99 now anyway I think.

 

I also used a lot more global state in my C days, although that was more to do with where I was at as a programmer rather than the language. Looking back now, I can see ways to write much better code in C than I ever did in my early 20s. I've often thought that the only thing I couldn't recreate with relative ease in a C environment that I rely on a lot in C++ is automatic destructors.

Edited by Aardvajk

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My advice is simple:

just go for it!

I mean, you will always become smarter of it and if it's cheap, you have nothing to lose.

I think a short course will get you a bit into the whole programming with c and c++ scene to, so you can see for yourself if you like it and go on learning it.

I should not hasitate too much, but just try it!

 

I hope it'll be helpfull.

good luck.

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Learning any new skill is never a bad thing.  If the course is free and you have the time to do it then go for it.

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SDL which is a really good multimedia library that can definitely help make games is written in C. So yes you can definitely do games in C.

 

C is very much alive and kicking on the Linux platform since it is use for a lot of high-level application using the GTK+ UI framework (which also has binding to other languages).

 

Here's an interesting article about a developer on the Pandora handheld who chose C for his hobby game.

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