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Game Institute (again)

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So, I've been reading some posts all over the internet and on this forum, too.

But they are (almost all) quite old, so I decided to ask again.

What do you think about GameInstitute?

Is it still worth (49$ at the moment I'm writing)? Are they updating their courses?

 

I'm actually having a look at 3DBuzz, too.. if anybody has some comments on these, let me know

Edited by fiesil

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What is your goal? In other words, why do you want to use either of those sites?

By the way, $49 is nothing. A hamburger is not "worth" $49, but (depending on your goal) learning something could well be worth $49.

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Thanks for your reply. 

Well, learn how to code (I've started with C# now, but as far as I know, there's no big difference right now as I'm at classes and objects) and start coding games.

Final aim: Blizzard / Riot

Nearer aim: game developer

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Final aim: Blizzard / Riot


Then you need a full-on university Computer Science degree, not a certificate from a learn-how-to-program-games website.

Moving this to the appropriate forum.
You should read this forum's FAQs: http://www.gamedev.net/page/reference/faq.php/_/breaking-into-the-industry-r16 Edited by Tom Sloper

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Then you need a full-on university Computer Science degree, not a certificate from a learn-how-to-program-games website.

Sure, I'm going to the university in 2 months. But as some users suggested, I should get some projects done while I'm there, for my CV. So I wanted to know if they're a good start.

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$49 is nothing.

 

Well... in the long term $49 is nothing. I agree that these days I'll shell out $50 for a book without much thought. However, the OP is a teenager who may not have access to much money.  In the short term, if $49 is too much for you, then learn from other sources.

 

At your age (17 or 18) and pre-college status, there is not much you can do over two months that will radically transform your knowledge and ability. 

 

If you want to study a language or learn a tool or technology, then go for it.  But for the next several years you will be studying a wide range of topics in depth. Two months of your own undirected study is less than 5% of what you should get out of a 4 year degree. Sure, it is greater than zero, but be realistic at how much it actually is.

 

I encourage you to find some hobby projects you can build while in school beyond your class projects. If you can find ways to use the knowledge in your classes then great, but building some projects outside of class is a great way to build a useful portfolio and to gain experience.

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At your age (17 or 18) and pre-college status, there is not much you can do over two months that will radically transform your knowledge and ability. 

Yeah, agree; but I just want to start a long term project, that's why I'm following a C# course (basic)

be realistic

...you're right. I have to think a while before doing it.

I encourage you to find some hobby projects you can build while in school beyond your class projects. If you can find ways to use the knowledge in your classes then great, but building some projects outside of class is a great way to build a useful portfolio and to gain experience.

OK, sounds great. I'd really love to make something on my own! That's why I thought I could buy GameInstitute's books, but it seems they are a bit outdated, aren't they? But their courses seem really huge and I'd not want to miss the chance to get  them, if I can ever work something out from them. I don't know if they are (still?) great 


I would not bother paying them.

Both GameInstitute and 3DBuzz?

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Promit, on 11 Aug 2014 - 2:32 PM, said:

I would not bother paying them.


Both GameInstitute and 3DBuzz?


fiesil, you need to make a decision, right? In order to make a decision, you should think very hard about what it is you want to accomplish, then (since you have already chosen some options), collect pros and cons about your options (maybe even identify additional options), and make a decision grid: see http://www.sloperama.com/advice/m70.htm -- you say in 2 months you're starting college. Once you start college, you'll need to focus on the job at hand (your studies), so if you're just trying to get a head start, there's no time to take an online course (assuming any course would take longer than 2 months). You could also just continue your studies with C#.

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I would not bother paying them.
 

Both GameInstitute and 3DBuzz?

 

Both of them look like junk to me. I saw the GameInstitute code back in the day when it was still free content, and there's nothing in there I'd pay for. Doesn't look like he's changed anything, just added a handful more. 3DBuzz looks even less useful.

 

In the past fifteen years, I've gone from a 12 year old dreamer to a 27 year old professional with title credits. I've been on GameDev.Net for pretty much the entire journey, and never once have I felt that paying for online content was a good idea. The times I got real value for money were when I bought books written by knowledgeable professionals focused on specific subjects. GT and 3DBuzz are nowhere near that bar.

Edited by Promit

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I watched a 3DBuzz video quite a while back.  The programmer "Nelson" or something was the most abrasive, negative, and annoying voice I've ever heard on a video.  I have no idea if he actually taught anything or simply just complained -- my advice would be to steer clear of their paid content.

 

I'd never heard of GI and watched a video on YouTube (which was free, by the way).  Had a lot of info on tire traction, relative forces, and maths for a racing game.  I enjoyed the presentation style and what I learned.

 

If I were to pick between the two, GI's free video was pretty good.  If you're hell-bent on spending money, I guess I'd pick them.  I can't comment on the code since I the video did not focus on coding but rather design.

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