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Sugavanas

UE4 or Unity for a Racing Games Targeted on Consoles and Standalone

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Hello guys, can anyone help me choose between those ? 

 

I have used unity for a long time and know more about it than UE4 which i have using for several months. But as I am only targeting high end graphics, UE4 is good in that situtation. I am not sure if you can make custom tools like you do in Unity with c# in UE4 with c++. As that tools make it easy for  editing the scenes. Which one do you choose ? and is there any tutorial for c++ in ue4

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I'm always a little bit leery when someone posts about planning on having awesome graphics, but are a beginners, as it takes a lot of work to have great graphics, and it's usually best just to concentrate on making the game, making it fun and finishing it first.  That said, yeah, UE4 should work just fine for your purposes.  I am only vaguely aware of the custom tool chain of UE4, but it does exist, and there are plenty of UE4 tutorials around.

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I am working on a kind-of-racing game in unity with what I would call quite high-end graphics.

 

You can achieve quite a good look, at least on PC, with good performance, if you optimize, optimize, optimize... and then optimize some more.

 

While UE4 might give you more headroom (don't know really, never used it and haven't seen a real benchmarking comparison), you will find that even with UE4 the situation changes little. No free lunch there too.

 

So I personally would advise you to stick to Unity as you seem to already know the engine, if you can spend something.

 

Why only if you are able to spend anything? Getting really high-end graphics with Unity cost me about 1600-2000$ in money... you will need the Pro version for the Image Effects, soft shadows and deferred (And the profiler for easy optimazations), and some Black Magic from the Asset Store to improve the weaknesses of Unitys out of the box shaders and systems. Like a good Terrain shading system, some helpers for creating race tracks, dynamic weather systems and stuff like that. If you want to go really nextgen, there are multiple good physically based shader systems in the Asset Store (one of them, Lux, is even free!).

 

If you are not able to spend much, you will loose out on a lot of stuff in Unity. Nothing a crafty programmer could not get around with some code (there are image effect systems that don't need Unity Pro, so you could write your own SSAO System I guess, same with soft shadows, or the bumped / parallax terrain shaders)... but of course that needs a lot of time and skill to pull off.

 

If you can spend only 20$, UE4 sounds like the best solution for you. That is what the total engine package with no upgrades after a month will cost you.

 

 

Of course, with my 2000$ I got some Systems for generating Race Tracks and stuff like that that you will miss in UE4. But of course, again, nothing a crafty programmer couldn't write himself.

And I get free upgrades for the full Unity 4 cycle, which translates to 2 years or about 240$ worth of UE4 subscription time. But again, I guess you can just pay another 20$ if you see something interesting coming up in a new release after a year or so without paying all the time, so yes, at the moment UE4 IS cheaper than Unity PRO.

 

 

Be aware though: Thanks to UE4 the playing field changed dramatically for Unity, that is most probably why Unity 6 was announced so suddenly (I expected it at least 6 months later) and why a lot of things became free (hard shadows for Unity Free version, Android and iOS Indie is now free)....

Who knows, maybe the cost structure will be changed again when Unity 6 comes around, maybe more stuff will be available to Unity free users (hopefully replaced by even more functions in the PRO version).

Time will tell... but something to keep in mind.

Edited by Gian-Reto
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Might want to try the UE4 forums.

 

 

Want kind of racing games are we talking about?

I would go for anything over Unity tbh biggrin.png

 

 

I'm always a little bit leery when someone posts about planning on having awesome graphics, but are a beginners, as it takes a lot of work to have great graphics, and it's usually best just to concentrate on making the game, making it fun and finishing it first.  That said, yeah, UE4 should work just fine for your purposes.  I am only vaguely aware of the custom tool chain of UE4, but it does exist, and there are plenty of UE4 tutorials around.

 

 

I am working on a kind-of-racing game in unity with what I would call quite high-end graphics.

 

You can achieve quite a good look, at least on PC, with good performance, if you optimize, optimize, optimize... and then optimize some more.

 

While UE4 might give you more headroom (don't know really, never used it and haven't seen a real benchmarking comparison), you will find that even with UE4 the situation changes little. No free lunch there too.

 

So I personally would advise you to stick to Unity as you seem to already know the engine, if you can spend something.

 

Why only if you are able to spend anything? Getting really high-end graphics with Unity cost me about 1600-2000$ in money... you will need the Pro version for the Image Effects, soft shadows and deferred (And the profiler for easy optimazations), and some Black Magic from the Asset Store to improve the weaknesses of Unitys out of the box shaders and systems. Like a good Terrain shading system, some helpers for creating race tracks, dynamic weather systems and stuff like that. If you want to go really nextgen, there are multiple good physically based shader systems in the Asset Store (one of them, Lux, is even free!).

 

If you are not able to spend much, you will loose out on a lot of stuff in Unity. Nothing a crafty programmer could not get around with some code (there are image effect systems that don't need Unity Pro, so you could write your own SSAO System I guess, same with soft shadows, or the bumped / parallax terrain shaders)... but of course that needs a lot of time and skill to pull off.

 

If you can spend only 20$, UE4 sounds like the best solution for you. That is what the total engine package with no upgrades after a month will cost you.

 

 

Of course, with my 2000$ I got some Systems for generating Race Tracks and stuff like that that you will miss in UE4. But of course, again, nothing a crafty programmer couldn't write himself.

And I get free upgrades for the full Unity 4 cycle, which translates to 2 years or about 240$ worth of UE4 subscription time. But again, I guess you can just pay another 20$ if you see something interesting coming up in a new release after a year or so without paying all the time, so yes, at the moment UE4 IS cheaper than Unity PRO.

 

 

Be aware though: Thanks to UE4 the playing field changed dramatically for Unity, that is most probably why Unity 6 was announced so suddenly (I expected it at least 6 months later) and why a lot of things became free (hard shadows for Unity Free version, Android and iOS Indie is now free)....

Who knows, maybe the cost structure will be changed again when Unity 6 comes around, maybe more stuff will be available to Unity free users (hopefully replaced by even more functions in the PRO version).

Time will tell... but something to keep in mind.

 

I am not a beginner. Atleast in unity. i have get used to unity's pro shadows with downloaded versions. but now when thinking about it making a game, i am not able to spend that much. If it was like ue4 term where you only pay once and get the license for 75$ it would be awesome tongue.png

 

I don't care about the tools that are available on assets store because i don't want to use them

 

the racing game is gonna be like asphalt, need for speed but more different. I don't want to discuss the idea now.

Edited by Sugavanas
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I am not a beginner. Atleast in unity. i have get used to unity's pro shadows with downloaded versions. but now when thinking about it making a game, i am not able to spend that much. If it was like ue4 term where you only pay once and get the license for 75$ it would be awesome tongue.png

 

I don't care about the tools that are available on assets store because i don't want to use them

 

the racing game is gonna be like asphalt, need for speed but more different. I don't want to discuss the idea now.

 

 

I think then, at least for now, you can rule out Unity. Achieving Highend Graphics with the Free Edition, without Shaders and Systems from the Asset Store, is an uphill struggle that might come close to doing everything yourself in DX or GL without the help of an engine (I am overexegarating here a little bit of course).

 

If you cannot wait for Unity 5 (and a more powerful Free version is only a possibility, not even a rumour at the current point in time), go for UE4. I don't think you will regret it, UE4 looks pretty decent from what I've seen.

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I am not a beginner. Atleast in unity. i have get used to unity's pro shadows with downloaded versions. but now when thinking about it making a game, i am not able to spend that much. If it was like ue4 term where you only pay once and get the license for 75$ it would be awesome tongue.png

 

I don't care about the tools that are available on assets store because i don't want to use them

 

the racing game is gonna be like asphalt, need for speed but more different. I don't want to discuss the idea now.

 

 

I think then, at least for now, you can rule out Unity. Achieving Highend Graphics with the Free Edition, without Shaders and Systems from the Asset Store, is an uphill struggle that might come close to doing everything yourself in DX or GL without the help of an engine (I am overexegarating here a little bit of course).

 

If you cannot wait for Unity 5 (and a more powerful Free version is only a possibility, not even a rumour at the current point in time), go for UE4. I don't think you will regret it, UE4 looks pretty decent from what I've seen.

 

 

thanks, for now, I htinkf or next  months, i will get done all models and sort of stuff. I will choose the engine then.

 

I am most probably gonna choose UE4, i will try to underrstand its source and work on some c++ tools.

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thanks, for now, I htinkf or next  months, i will get done all models and sort of stuff. I will choose the engine then.

 

 

I am most probably gonna choose UE4, i will try to underrstand its source and work on some c++ tools.

 

 

Yep, that is actually a pretty good plan. Its nice to have some 3D Models when you start using the engine. Just make sure you use a format that the engine can import (don't think it is a problem with UE4 but in some engines you will get errors depending on the format), or at least that you are able to convert your models to format that is importable.

 

 

By having a look at the source and tools I guess you want to write some helper tools for use with the engine? Maybe check the Epic Page and Forums for what is already there. Just talking from Unity expierience here, but most probably you will find for every problem you think about, somebody has already solved it. And in about half of this cases, he made it available to the community (in case of Unity not always for free though -> Asset Store).

 

 

Other than that, have fun modelling and good luck starting out with your engine of choice

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