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MRom

What's the industry like?

31 posts in this topic

 


I was going to focus on learning a programming language fist and start off with 'C' then go into 'C++'.

Don't.

 

Learn C if you want to learn C, learn C++ if you want to learn C++.

 

In human languages you probably wouldn't say "I would like to learn Spanish and French, so I'll begin by learning Latin since they both grew from it", or "As preparation to learning Norwegian I'll first learn Old Norse." The same with programming language, if you want to learn a language then learn that language.

 

 

Interesting.

 

I'll do that then. I've read that C++ isn't for beginners and that beginners should start out with 'C'..

I'll start tonight, do a few tutorials and see where it takes me.

 

Again, thanks for the input.

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I agree that c++ has a rather harsh learning curve compared to some other languages. But I disagree that c should be the precursor language, the learning curve for modern c is also rather steep. Instead if you just want to learn how to program use something like python or C# that has a more shallow curve if you would rather learn the concepts of programming rather than diving in head first to the systems-development level.

I tend to be very logic oriented and pick up programs/software pretty fast. I've started some tutorials via http://www.learncpp.com/ and am enjoying it.

Generally for me I'd rather dive in head first and learn the harder language right off the bat as long as it's the most commonly used in the industry, rather than fiddle around with the subsidiary ones just because they're easier.

I understand that each language has it's weakness. I'll not be ignorant enough to pretend I know more than that; but, is C++ not the standard? From what I've read I keep seeing that it's the most commonly used.

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From what I've read I keep seeing that it's the most commonly used.

For console systems, yes, C++ is the primary language. It is one of many languages used.

 

For cross-platform engines, yes, c++ is the primary language. It is one of many languages used.

 

For most web games, for most game scripts, for a large number of mobile games, no, c++ is not the primary language.

 

Even if your goal is to develop web games in flash or html5+javascript or Java or python, you should still invest the time to be at least familiar in passing with C++. All professional programmers should be somewhat familiar with many different languages, and make it a point to learn languages and technologies regularly, even if it isn't directly related to your job duties.

 

You never know when a sudden transition will be necessary and those skills will be useful. If your only skill is a knowledge of non-current C++ you probably won't be employable in the long term. Developers need to always grow and develop their skills, just like doctors must continuously re-learn medicine as advancements are made, lawyers must continuously re-learn the law as laws are passed and rulings are made, and auto mechanics need to continuously re-learn how vehicle technologies change over time. Programmers need to constantly evolve to new skills, not just Ye Goode Olde C++.

 

For example, while I use C++ for much stuff, I use C#, Java, SQL, HTML, JavaScript, PHP, Python, and many scripting languages on a daily basis. I regularly or somewhat infrequently use about 15 different languages. Just because C++ is the core language of the engine does not mean it is the only language used.

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For most web games, for most game scripts, for a large number of mobile games, no, c++ is not the primary language.

 

Out of curiosity, what would you say is most common or appropriate language for these applications?

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For most web games, for most game scripts, for a large number of mobile games, no, c++ is not the primary language.

 
Out of curiosity, what would you say is most common or appropriate language for these applications?
I mentioned several.

Flash, html+jJavaScript, and Java are all quite popular for web-based games. For mobile, although some C++ bindings are commonly used the native languages for Apple and Android are Objective C (which is a sibling to C++ also a sibling to modern C) and Java respectively.
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