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DragonBooster

Do i need to know physics before using Unity3D?

14 posts in this topic

Along with programming, do you have to understand a good amount of physics such as velocity,friction and etc. to make a 2D game with it?

 

EDIT for mods: Sorry can you move this to the API section please thanks.

Edited by Zero_Breaker
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Technically no. However, that is hinged on the fact you do not use physics in your game. You may want to understand frame per second and a few other timing items.

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I see, but where would i find those? Because i am very confused on how you would program a game's movement.

Edited by Zero_Breaker
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I would suggest taking a look at some Unity tutorials. It's been a while since I checked personally, but I seem to remember Unity's official tutorials being fairly decent at introducing basic concepts like this.

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Thanks! I was really confused on where to learn about stuff like that. I saw a book called game coding complete. Does it contain the information about timing and etc.?

Edited by Zero_Breaker
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Nope. I've been using Unity for a year and a half now and created a 2D board game with 3D objects and I barely graduated from high school. I lost interest in math after the 4th grade of elementary school. Too bad there weren't video games in those days. I would have been inspired to study math in spite of the boring teachers.
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Thanks a lot Gian-Reto! Your post was very informative and helps me understand Unity a little bit more. For now i just want to experiment with things 2D game related and create a 2D game. Later on i would love to create a 3D Stealth game so i think i would have to learn some physics.

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Thanks a lot Gian-Reto! Your post was very informative and helps me understand Unity a little bit more. For now i just want to experiment with things 2D game related and create a 2D game. Later on i would love to create a 3D Stealth game so i think i would have to learn some physics.

 

AFAIK in Unity 2D Physics is just a special case of 3D Physics (PhysX constrained to two dimensions), so whatever you learn creating your 2D game will translate to later 3D undertakings.

 

However, as I never dabbled in 2D until now, I am not sure that is true now with all the new 2D Systems that came out with Unity 4.X ... so make sure you first check out the 2D Unity Tutorials and look there for instructions on doing the physics, before you head into the general physics documentation.

 

If you mix a 2D Scene with 3D Physics without constraints, the results might be hilarious (like an object getting lost in the third dimension :) )

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Thanks I will definitely check them out and would you say that the Unity tutorials are sufficient enough to learn Unity 3D?

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Thanks I will definitely check them out and would you say that the Unity tutorials are sufficient enough to learn Unity 3D?

 

Actually I never REALLY tried doing the tutorials from start to end. It's just not how I do things (yes, I am very impatient at times smile.png )

 

I DO say however the Unity documentation is vast and contains ALMOST all you will ever need to develop in Unity. The information sometimes is a little bit scattered, but you will find your way around in a short while.

 

 

I'd say wet your feet with the tutorials, start with your own project as soon as you feel confident enough, and never hesitate to ask question either in the Unity forums, the Unity answers page or here... there is a vast community so tap into the combined knowledge of it. Just be aware: most question have already been asked. Do a quick google search first.

 

If the tutorials will not teach you 100% of what you need to know, they will at least get you started on your journey.

Edited by Gian-Reto
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Yes i know what you mean i like being able to start with my project as soon as possible because ever since i've relearned C# i became very impatient and just wanted to mess around with Unity.

 

Than you very much for your help Gian-Reto!

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You may want to start casually studying basic physics in any case at Khan Academy or some similar source. The fundamentals are really not difficult, and are often very interesting. You only need to learn a couple basic concepts of Newtonian physics (force, inertia, and acceleration) in order to make something like Super Mario Bros.

 

Do yourself a favor and take a look. You may like it.

 

https://www.khanacademy.org/science/physics

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