• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Navyman

Lore in CCG

8 posts in this topic

The topic of lore came up in a recent meeting of the minds for a CCG (Collectable Card Game) I am designing, which has prompted me to come here to ask how important is lore in a CCG?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wai: Thank you for your well thought-out example questions.

I rushed this to the forums. Therefore, I will be looking at re-asking my question.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That being said...

 

Lore in a CCG is important in that it eases player understanding of (sometimes very complex) game mechanics.

 

There was a very good article on MTG online once where they explained the importance of lore by picking abstract playtest cards and replace the keywords with 'ability name 1' etc.

Reading the cards was complex and tedious. It made little sense, and the reader wasn't really sure his understanding was correct because of the lack of retro action.

Adding a card name that was fitting, an image (thus defining the action or creature it was), and changing the ability name into something more evocative quickly made the reading that much simpler simply because players had some expectations regarding this type of creature, etc.

 

For example, no one is surprised to see a regeneration effect on a troll, and possibly an immunity to death unless burned by fire. Though these 2-3 sub-abilities could amount to a lot of text, there's no denying that most people have a preconceived notion of what a troll is and this can be leveraged to simplify mechanics in-game.

 

Likewise, a Fire Elemental dealing recurring damage in the form of burn damage is much easier to understand when presented as such (as opposed to an abstract creature dealing recurring damage).

 

This applies to various scenarios indeed and I'm only just pointing the tip of the iceberg here: how lore can help you lessen the learning curve for your players.

 

Now, as Navyman pointed out, I might have completely missed the point of this thread, but hopefully not.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The game will have lore, but because it is in the early stages I was wondering how much impact does changing lore during the time up to the launch of the game affect people and their thoughts on the game?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you're not producing a comic/animation/machinima/novelization/trailer/kickstarter/etc. to stir up interest in the game, then lore can be changed with impunity before launch.  It's only a problem to change things you've already told many future or current players about.  Lore is heavily related to advertising and turning people into loyal fans of your IP who will buy related products like t-shirts, plushies, kickstarter packages, etc.

 

That said, lore can inspire good concept design, and it can be a problem to change existing concepts to match a lore change and remain coherent.

Edited by sunandshadow
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@sunandshadow

I hit you perfectly addressed the issue I have in the back of my mind, the idea that changing lore effects the advertising ability of a project.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glad if I could help.  I wasn't sure what you were asking until your third post mentioning the time before launch, but then I got the idea.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes. We had a lore meeting last night and I raised some of the points here. It was great, because we nailed down the lore and it allowed us to name a few things that had been simply labeled "Placeholder". Thank you. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0