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Orymus3

You're a witch/demon hunter/slayer. You're likely to carry...

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Orymus3    18821

I'm currently toying with a playable character that has a background in with/demon hunting and slaying.

I'm wondering what gameplay 'tool' he should have at his disposal that is both fun and on-theme.

 

So far, I've worked along the lines of figuring out what he's likely to hunt, and bring a tool that somehow works for that, but I find out that the hunter is not likely to know what he's hunting for so that he should have some versatile tools with him so as to avoid overburden.

 

Versatile tools I've figured so far:

- Silver dagger / stake

- Holy Water flask

- Torch (light source, can be throw for distant light source, can burn nearby enemies susceptible to burning (such as a troll for example))

- ...

 

I'm falling short of anything exciting this far.

 

Any suggestion?

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Molotov cocktails and a glock? That's what I'd bring. tongue.png

If you want to theme it better, dip your silver bullets in holy water and etch crosses in them.

 

If medieval setting, I'd bring a sword - cold steel or damascus steel, probably a scimitar with a long silver parrying dagger as well - with a couple leather pouches packed full of gunpowder with long but quick-burning fuses for remote detonation. Bonus points if I get a few tubes filled with greek fire I can blow into people's faces.

 

I'd also bring a bible, and some "holy water" (read: strong brandy as a painkiller and antiseptic).

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Wai    1007

It might be helpful to brainstorm by sections.

 

Section 1: "Normal" adventure/survival/camping gear

This section depends how much stuff people would need to carry just to make a trip. This includes money objects of various kinds that the hunter would need in different regions.

 

Section 2: Monster detection gear

Stuff that the hunter uses to locate/track/uncover monsters. Consider whether monsters would hide, or do they just show up? Do they have lairs? are the lairs hidden? Can normal people see the monsters? What does the hunter have that allows him to see them or know where they are? Do monsters need to be summoned? Are there items required to open gates to lairs/crypts?

 

Section 3: Monster trapping gear

Stuff used to trap or set up traps for monsters. Does the hunter need to capture monsters? How would he subdue the monster and bring it back? Does the hunter need to stalk the monster and wait for it to appear? Can the hunter normally defeat a monster in combat? If not, how does he weaken the monster before a fight? How many monsters would be too many for the hunter to fight at once?

 

Section 4: Defensive gear

Stuff that protects the hunter during a fight. How do the monsters attack? What can block or weaken monster attacks? What can help the hunter escape if there are too many monsters to fight?

 

Section 5: Assault gear

Stuff the hunter uses to attack during combat. What weapons does the hunter use? Is the weapon the same kind that could be used against human? Is the weapon unique? Did the hunter design it himself? Do all hunters so similar weapons that distinguish them from normal warriors? Does the weapon designed to fight against one monster, or a group of them? Does the weapon use ammo?

 

Section 6: Communication gear

Stuff the hunter uses to communicate with other hunters, his boss, demons, or other factions, etc. What is the social status of hunters? Do they have special privileges? Do they need to carry licenses? Are hunters competitors? Do hunters have factions? Do hunters kill one another? How does a hunter know if another hunter is in his faction?

 

Section 7: Keepsakes

Stuff that the hunter keeps around for spiritual or emotional reasons.

 

Section 8: Loots/trophies

Stuff that the hunter is meant to collect from the adventure/monsters.

 

Section 9: Pets

Pets/horses/companions or other interactive beings that go with the hunter.

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Orymus3    18821


Molotov cocktails and a glock? That's what I'd bring. 
If you want to theme it better, dip your silver bullets in holy water and etch crosses in them.
 
If medieval setting, I'd bring a sword - cold steel or damascus steel, probably a scimitar with a long silver parrying dagger as well - with a couple leather pouches packed full of gunpowder with long but quick-burning fuses for remote detonation. Bonus points if I get a few tubes filled with greek fire I can blow into people's faces.
 

 

Funny. That's a very pragmatic yet exclusively belligerent approach to 'hunting'. I figure that, if the threat is known and movement is minimal, that'd make sense, but I envisioned a much different outlook. I have a feeling my character has been journeying without a home for a while and hunts whatever he hears about. Part of his skillset is to improvise with whatever he has, and I'm assuming the backpack is filled with great artifacts of some kind.

 


I'd also bring a bible, and some "holy water" (read: strong brandy as a painkiller and antiseptic).

 

Actually sounds great. Bible can serve many uses, but brandy is by far the most interesting 'tool' to bring. It has many uses, including acting as fuel if necessary.

In movies, the 'bright guy' always invents a contraption from whatever is present in the room and I always feel there's too much luck involved. A good all-purpose tool can really create-your-own-luck. Brandy's great!

 

 


It might be helpful to brainstorm by sections.

 

First and foremost, thanks. The thought process here is very interesting.

 

2 through 6 (inclusively) are the ones I'm very interested in. Basically anything with some gameplay attached to it. The most versatile the best.

Your questions have been great and helped me tremendously assess this already, but feel free to chime in with any suggestion example if you wish as well.

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Tom Sloper    16040
Should have an assortment of the usual:
Crucifix
Garlic
Silver bullets
Mirrors
Moondust
Kryptonite
Mary Jane's tears
Swiss Army knife
Cupid arrows
Yes, I may be getting a little silly, but it's worth mentioning these.

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BlackCorsair    115

A staff with huge scull on it. When demon is killed scull consumes it's soul. In future fights demons soul can be used to create a ball of energy that can be controlled separately with the power of scull. That ball can be used for ranged/magic attack as an opposite to melee fighting stuff. Different demon souls can provide different stats/power modifiers for the ball.

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Orymus3    18821


Should have an assortment of the usual:

 

Vampire Hunting:

Crucifix/Garlic (warding)

Mirror (validation)

 

Werewolves

Silver bullets (killing / preventing morphing)

 

Superman

Kryptonite (assuming we chase superheroes...)

 

Not sure what the other ones are for though. I may not be familiar with these tropes?

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Deflinek    1619


I have a feeling my character has been journeying without a home for a while and hunts whatever he hears about. Part of his skillset is to improvise with whatever he has, and I'm assuming the backpack is filled with great artifacts of some kind.

Your question and especially this part reminds me of the early books of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Witcher Especially the "before saga" ones ("The Sword of Destiny" and "The Last Wish"). The setting is very similar to what you described - The Witcher travels from town to town looking for monsters to kill for some reward. He uses mainly one of two swords (one for monsters and one for humans smile.png) and set of elixirs that can give him temporary powers (speed, night vision, ...) The drawback with elixirs is that they severely weaken user when duration ends.

You may check the books for other inspiration as well.

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Orymus3    18821

I`m loosely familiar with this series. I think I've put 1 or 2 hours into the first installment of the video game series. For some reason it didn't stick with me.

I think the idea of having just potions and swords (an potion-maker-warrior) was a bit weak to me. I wanted a more crafty / flamboyant approach. I like a hunter with its tools.

 

After watching both Underworld 3: Rise of the Lycans & Van Helsing for a 2nd time, I'm unimpressed with the logistics they have. They undeniably hit the mood, but they lack proper 'tools'.

 

To be honest, the closest thing I know that comes to what I'm trying to make is probably these:

- Zelda: A Link to the Past

The hero has a bunch of tools he unlocks, and he gets to use them under various different situations. Though more of the game is very easy and straightforward, it is an enjoyable experience nonetheless.

 

- Blood Omen: Legacy of Kain

There may be too few tools to use, but the shapeshifting helps a lot. There's still a sense of exploration and problem-solving, on a much lesser scale however.

 

- Castlevania: Symphony of the Night

A classic that allows the user to shapeshift to accomplish deeds. Other 'powers' are innate to the character (relics). This feels less like tools but serves the same purpose mechanically speaking.

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Avalander    2412

I'd bring a bear trap, a net and every trap material I could come with. Combat is overrated, why risk your life when you can capture your enemies in a more safe way?

 

A rope. You never think about it until you need it.

 

Something to set things on fire. Depending on your setting this could be a torch, alchemist fire, gasoline and a lighter...

 

A shovel, because sometimes you just need to bury things.

 

And a lockpick.

 

And never forget to bring a leather jacket, just for the sake of looking like a badass.

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Orymus3    18821


bear trap

 

Not bad, but probably very heavy. Also pretty inefficient against foes that aren't specifically ground-bound, but I can see it being a general means to weaken/slow down a foe.


rope

True that. Any specific applications though? I see it being a good part of a hookshot mechanism, but not much else.

 


torch

Definitely. That's very all-purpose, and once of the first things I considered myself. Very helpful indeed!

 


A shovel, because sometimes you just need to bury things.

Please explain?

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jbadams    25676

You might also take some cues from the TV series 'Supernatural'.  It got a bit silly and focussed on a few specific stories later on, but started off as a more serious show where the main characters travel around hunting a variety of monsters and supernatural beings.

 

 

One of the first things that comes to mind thinking about that series is that the two brothers travelled in a car, keeping a variety of weapons and equipment in the boot/trunk -- will the hunter in your game have access to something similar, or are we restricted to equipment that can be carried on his/her person?

 

Characters in the show typically own (and pass on) journals detailing the monsters they have hunted, making these journals invaluable sources of information on the habits, strengths, and weaknesses of any monsters that have been previously hunted successfully.

 

 

Most of these have already been mentioned, but I'll try to expand upon them with some possible uses.

 

Rope could be used:

  • to tie up people -- because they're aiding or summoning monsters, or because they're somehow controlling something that wouldn't otherwise be evil -- or to tie up monsters.
  • to hold doors shut OR prevent them from being closed.
  • to gain access to difficult-to-reach areas; climbing down/up, getting across a drop, etc.
  • to create traps; snares, slings, swinging blades or weights, etc.
  • as an improvised weapon.

 

 

Shovels might be needed:

  • to dig something up.  Maybe you need to dig up a corpse to destroy or bind a spirit.  Maybe you need to dig up some artefact.
  • to bury something.  Maybe certain monsters need to be buried as part of the process of destroying them, or maybe just as a temporary measure whilst you find a more permanent solution.
  • as an improvised tool to jam a door shut or open, to break a lock, etc.
  • as an improvised weapon.

Rather than a simple shovel however, might I recommend an entrenching tool.  They're basically a smaller folding/collapsible spade/pick combination, and are therefore easier to carry than an ordinary shovel but should have more potential uses.

 

 

Mirrors can be used:

  • to see around corners.
  • to verify vampires (assuming they don't reflect in your setting) or other creatures which don't reflect or may be revealed in a reflection.
  • as a distraction; reflecting light on a wall or the ground, or to blind someone/something be shining it in the eyes.
  • to reflect certain creature's special talents; a Medusa's petrifying gaze for example. 

 

Explosives can be used:

  • to open or close things.
  • to destroy artefacts, creatures or bodies.
  • as a distraction.
  • as a very brief light-source.  Might even be blinding to certain monsters.

 

Candles can be used:

  • as a light source.
  • as a distraction, either by placing it somewhere to be seen as a distraction, or to cover up or provide a new smell. 
  • for rituals to summon or dispel things, or perhaps to strip the power from something.
  • as a basic defence against something with a particular fear of or weakness to fire.
  • to provide melted wax for sealing things, as an ingredient for a spell or ritual, to stick something in place, etc.

 

A large/long leather coat can be used:

  • as clothing (providing warmth, covering up some of the other equipment you're carrying, etc.)
  • to smother a fire.
  • to hide things, or cover something that might be dangerous to touch.
  • as an improvised bag or pouch to carry something.
  • as a somewhat poor source of fuel to start a fire (for signalling, or just to burn things) if nothing else is available.
  • to plug a small gap (drainage pipes, small windows, etc.)

 

A magnifying glass can be used:

  • to read small writing.
  • to light a fire if sunlight is available, or to focus any other type of light; maybe you need more focussed moonlight for a particular ritual for example.

and, if broken can be used:

  • as an improvised cutting tool or weapon.  Maybe certain monsters even have a weakness to glass in the same way as some are vulnerable to silver.
  • as a simple trap or alarm; scatter it on a hard floor and listen for the crunching, maybe also hurting an opponent's feet.
  • as a distraction; throwing pieces (or the whole thing) to make a noise, or visually to distract something attracted to shiny/reflective things.
  • as a spell component; some rituals might require glass (perhaps powdered) as an ingredient.

 

A monster hunter would want to have good, strong, practical clothing.  Possibly reasonably nondescript, an with plenty of places to carry/hide their other equipment.  They might have things like wrist/ankle/arm-pit holsters or sheaths, boot-knives, etc.

 

 

What sort of monsters will your game actually feature, and what weaknesses might those creatures have?  Silver has been mentioned a lot because it is commonly a weakness of certain well-known monsters, but does it apply to yours?  The items carried by your character should be based on known weaknesses of creatures (s)he might face.

 

 

Hope some of those ideas help! :)

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Avalander    2412

 


rope

True that. Any specific applications though? I see it being a good part of a hookshot mechanism, but not much else.

 

 


A shovel, because sometimes you just need to bury things.
 

Please explain?

 

 

Well, jbadams proposed good uses for the rope and the shovel, and I'll add some more:

 

Rope

  • With a grappling hook, very useful for climbing walls.
  • You can tie it between two trees, in the entrance of a dungeon or whatever at a low height, with bells, so you'll hear the bells when anyone crosses through there.
  • You can rescue people trapped in deep holes.

 

Shovel

  • I was specifically thinking that if I found a treasure too heavy to carry while I'm on an adventure, I would bury it and pick it up when the adventure is finished, like Gandalf, Bilbo and the dwarfs did with the treasure of the trolls that tried to eat them in The Hobbit.
  • Also, you can use it to dig a pit trap.
  • In D&D, the trolls regenerate all the damage except the damage of fire and acid types, in a party I had, when we couldn't cause that type of damage, we would knock them out and bury them very deep.
  • As an improvised weapon.
Edited by Avalander

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LorenzoGatti    4442

Wai gives a good list of equipment functional categories, but most of them should be further broken down into specialist gear for monster hunters and generic adventuring gear everybody uses, because monster hunting is an additional occupation layered on standard adventuring hazards and concerns. For example, in a typical wilderness region everybody's "assault gear" should include a reliable way to hurt (but preferably not kill) a wolf or a bear, while in the appropriate environments basic camping equipment includes locust-proof tents, leech removal tools or air purification systems regardless of what you are doing there.

You might find out that sensible equipment for monster hunters are variants of regular equipment rather than overspecialized gear: for example, a sword with a silvered blade (as general purpose as it gets, and very effective against certain monsters) instead of a clumsy pistol with silver bullets (equally large and expensive, but usually ineffective).

I wouldn't worry about unexciting or unoriginal gear; hunting and meeting monsters should provide all the excitement, and players care about facing such activities with sufficiently effective and complete equipment.

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wodinoneeye    1689

Any holy symbol that is appropriate to the religion systems the game has (ineteresting might be mixing different ones  - religion types and their demon types).

 

To a Satanist an Angel is a Demon...

 

 

Oh and if you are 'hunting them'  then knowledge about them is one tool and bait to attract them is another.

Edited by wodinoneeye

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Orymus3    18821


You might also take some cues from the TV series 'Supernatural'

 

 

Funny, I was looking for a wikia entry to all of the tools they were using. Back in the days, I watched the first 4-5 seasons and enjoyed it (until the angels came that is) and I felt it was a good thing to go back to (that's where I got the idea of salt). 

 


Characters in the show typically own (and pass on) journals detailing the monsters they have hunted, making these journals invaluable sources of information on the habits, strengths, and weaknesses of any monsters that have been previously hunted successfully.

Haven't given any thought to having a journal, but I did have a 'book'. I want to keep things simple, but maybe there's room for that. Turning this into a gameplay mechanic might be a bit more complex (I don't want to just have a book show up on screen with text entries...)

 


Rope could be used:
to tie up people -- because they're aiding or summoning monsters, or because they're somehow controlling something that wouldn't otherwise be evil -- or to tie up monsters.
to hold doors shut OR prevent them from being closed.
to gain access to difficult-to-reach areas; climbing down/up, getting across a drop, etc.
to create traps; snares, slings, swinging blades or weights, etc.
as an improvised weapon.

 

Feels like it could be a good crafting ingredient, assuming I want to go down that route, thanks.

 


Shovels might be needed:
to dig something up.  Maybe you need to dig up a corpse to destroy or bind a spirit.  Maybe you need to dig up some artefact.
to bury something.  Maybe certain monsters need to be buried as part of the process of destroying them, or maybe just as a temporary measure whilst you find a more permanent solution.
as an improvised tool to jam a door shut or open, to break a lock, etc.
as an improvised weapon.
Rather than a simple shovel however, might I recommend an entrenching tool.  They're basically a smaller folding/collapsible spade/pick combination, and are therefore easier to carry than an ordinary shovel but should have more potential uses.

 

Interesting. However, what concerns me here is the gameplay implications of a shovel. Unless I plan on putting visual cues (which would mitigate the need for 'exploration') it could feel as random as in Zelda: A Link to the Past where the shovel was useful only truly once and, on a first playthrough, was a pain... Any reference of a shovel tool implemented in another game?

 


Mirrors can be used:
to see around corners.
to verify vampires (assuming they don't reflect in your setting) or other creatures which don't reflect or may be revealed in a reflection.
as a distraction; reflecting light on a wall or the ground, or to blind someone/something be shining it in the eyes.
to reflect certain creature's special talents; a Medusa's petrifying gaze for example. 

Indeed. Many games have coupled the idea of a reflective surface with another gear item however (such as a mirror shield in the Zelda series). To insure the 'tool' has as much use as possible, I might do my own 'blend' but I agree that this is an all-purpose tool every hunter should have.

 


Explosives can be used:
to open or close things.
to destroy artefacts, creatures or bodies.
as a distraction.
as a very brief light-source.  Might even be blinding to certain monsters.

 

I'm trying to come up with an explosive source that feels a bit original. Dynamite, bombs and C-4 are over-used. Brandy + torch felt more akin to a molotov cocktail but it might not pack a sufficient punch (it's really just incendiary). Any idea how I might implement some form of fragmentation grenade in a low fantasy medieval setting?

 


Candles can be used:
as a light source.
as a distraction, either by placing it somewhere to be seen as a distraction, or to cover up or provide a new smell. 
for rituals to summon or dispel things, or perhaps to strip the power from something.
as a basic defence against something with a particular fear of or weakness to fire.
to provide melted wax for sealing things, as an ingredient for a spell or ritual, to stick something in place, etc.

 

In what way do you feel candles would be superior to a torch specifically? I'm not aware of any properties 'wax' might have, but you seem to be hinting that it might.

 

 


A large/long leather coat can be used:
as clothing (providing warmth, covering up some of the other equipment you're carrying, etc.)
to smother a fire.
to hide things, or cover something that might be dangerous to touch.
as an improvised bag or pouch to carry something.
as a somewhat poor source of fuel to start a fire (for signalling, or just to burn things) if nothing else is available.
to plug a small gap (drainage pipes, small windows, etc.)

 

Could be a starting gear item that explains why the character has room for so many tools.

 


A magnifying glass can be used:
to read small writing.
to light a fire if sunlight is available, or to focus any other type of light; maybe you need more focussed moonlight for a particular ritual for example.

 

I wanted to introduce this item as well, because I feel it can be used as a 'lens of truth' in some ways, but I felt that the usage was too narrow to be worth implementing. I really want to avoid tools that are used only in a very specific kind of way because I feel that, though they're on-theme, gameplay would suffer. I realize this thread's purpose is not design but theme, yet I need to consider this nonetheless.

 


Maybe certain monsters even have a weakness to glass in the same way as some are vulnerable to silver.

Interesting. Are you aware of any trope where this would be applicable? I can see glass powder used as some form of shrapnel assuming it is within an explosive. It might be a bit too close to the idea that salt can force spirits to disassemble temporarily.

 


What sort of monsters will your game actually feature, and what weaknesses might those creatures have?

 

Temporary 'boss' roster includes:

 

Troll - Much like the myth, it would regen unless you apply fire to any wound you've made. So essentially, you need to combo up a decent attack on a body part and immediately follow up with fire to cauterize the wound and prevent regeneration. Boss would have something like 8 body parts, and how you wound them is entirely up to you, so long as you apply fire in a timely manner.

 

Lich - I'm very fond of the 'phylactery' concept. I think the Lich wouldn't be in a boss room, rather, it would follow the player around, and you need to escape its clutch as much as you can until you can find the phylactery and destroy it. Applications here would include something to detect the phylactery, and some way to destroy it. Then, possibly a very straightforward combat, against a very powerful foe however.

 

Vampire - I like the idea that vampires are masters of illusion. I think detection would play a role here as well. Some form of lens or mirror to detect which vampire is the true one (with the others being fake copies) or something akin to Ganon in ALTTP where you need to keep some form of light on to harm it.

 

Dragon - I'm really not sure what a dragon's weakness should be in this game. Most interesting tropes I've seen is located a weakness under their scales and fire an arrow or throw a spear at it. I don't think it would make for a much interesting 'hunt'. Thoughts?

 

Werewolf - This one would play out as an investigation. Basically, the player would think he's out to get a wizard. Some clues would point that he is actually a shapeshifter. All accounts, however, would point to a single shape in which he's ever shifted: a barghest or hound (I'd avoid the term wolf to make it too obvious). Thus, bringing silver would be the only way to defeat him in his lair, or else be in a fairly uneven fight. Silver would only 'turn' it back to a mortal though.

 

Ghost - Unsure yet, but possibly its ability to phase into immaterial form and still manipulate the environment. Salt comes to mind as a means to make it vulnerable, but I haven't given it much thought yet.

 

etc.

 


The items carried by your character should be based on known weaknesses of creatures (s)he might face.

 

I'm hoping for these tools to be not only combat-oriented. I like the concept of progressive mobility (the infamous double-jump in a metroidvania for example). Gearing up with a rope, a hookshot, etc, is appealing to me, and I believe a hunter may find himself in a situation where he needs these types of tool. Any thoughts on mobility-based tools? (including overwhelming obstacles altogether).

 


A really heavy duty crossbow.
 
With silver arrow heads.
Possibly blessed.
 
If an arrow is thick enough, its technically a stake

That's exactly my protagonist's main weapon currently. I like that it puts the player in a 'survival' feel where he needs to save the ammos for the big threats and find more efficient ways to dispatch the weaklings.

 

 

Thanks all!

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GoCatGoGames    1653

BOOKS!  And journals!  Add some sort of research aspect... maybe give the character a situational bonus when fighting witches if they are carrying Malleus Maleficarum.  Or, from another angle, let them fill a blank journal after fighting a vampire with helpful vampire tips, giving them a bonus during the next bout.

 

I like books.  They aren't so action-packed for games, though.

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Orymus3    18821


BOOKS!  And journals!  Add some sort of research aspect... maybe give the character a situational bonus when fighting witches if they are carrying Malleus Maleficarum.  Or, from another angle, let them fill a blank journal after fighting a vampire with helpful vampire tips, giving them a bonus during the next bout.
 
I like books.  They aren't so action-packed for games, though.

 

I'm ok with books not being action-packed, but I'd rather have them being an active skill in some way, not just a passive 'I've got this tome equipped'.

Best book item I've seen was probably the book of Mudora in Zelda: ALTTP because it asked you to at least use it to decipher texts (although, to be honest, text could've been deciphered automatically because you had said book tbh).

 

My best 'take' on it is to have a Grimoire that, when held, it repels some enemies (like a bible might repel undeads so long as you read the verses).

Also, I felt the same book could be used to open gates to another world, or seal them, decipher texts and puzzles and would allow the wielder to actually cast spells (aka, you can't cast spell if the Grimoire is not equiped?) or perhaps cast them at half the mana cost or something.

Maybe that's overly complex though, but I'm really trying to implement a book in there, as a valuable item in its own right.

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Wai    1007

Ideas for a playable book:

 

1. A book as a magical storage device.

The magic book allows the player to store something on each page. The adventurer can use it to store over-sized equipment, a stash of candies, a heavily-wounded friend, a wandering ghost, a fireball, a spell someone else cast, etc... You could decide whether each page is single-use or reusable.

 

2. A book as a training manual.

When the adventurer is at a town, the adventurer buy skills and put them in the book. The number of pages used depends on the complexity of the skill and the adventurer's affinity to the skill. As the adventurer gains EXP, the EXP is assigned to the skills. When the adventurer assigned enough EXP to a skill, the adventurer becomes proficient at the skill and no longer need the corresponding pages. The main effect of this mechanism is that the player needs to choose what skills to learn before leaving town, and the character could run out of skills to spend EXP in a long expedition.

 

3. A book as a teleport device.

As the adventurer visits different towns and portals, the adventurer can bind it to a page.

 

4. A book as a portal to closed realms.

The adventurer can revisit that closed realm as many time as he wants to investigate something.

 

5. A book as a combat simulation device.

The adventure can use the pages to capture environments and monsters and have mock battles.

 

6. A book as a talking companion.

It reminds the adventurer about the strengths and weakness of the area and monsters.

 

7. A book as a map of quest givers and what each quest giver wants.

 

8. A book as a strictly monster-trapping (and releasing) device.**

 

 

** Example story about 8:

 

The hunter is something like an exorcist. He goes around investigating and trapping demons occupying people's bodies using a special book that is "out-of-print". There are two particularly interesting constraints about this job:

 

1) He cannot let people know that he has the book because the book has many powerful demons trapped inside. It cannot fall into wrong hands. He cannot let people he helps know how he got rid of the demons. To be safe, most of the time he cannot let those people know that he was the one who did it.

 

2) The book can get full, and he needs to find people that can actually kill the demons because he either can't kill any demons, or that he can't kill them alone. But the first constraint still applies. He cannot let the person who might help him kill a demon know that he has the book, because the legend has it that one of the demons trapped in the book was actually an angel who can resurrect dead people, and holds the key that could open the gate to "heaven" (as of now, nobody can go to heaven because the gate is locked, everyone just dies or turn into a demon). When the main character got the book, many pages already had demons trapped inside. The character does not know what exact demon is trapped in those pages, he only knows about the ones that he trapped himself.

 

To know what demon is trapped in one of those pages before his time, he has two choices:

 

a) Enter the page by himself. Once he is in the page, he could exit quite easily before he is found by the demon(s). If he is found by the demon he might get killed and the book might be found by someone else. He suspects that this might be what happened to the last owner of the book.

 

b) Release the demon(s) trapped in a page to the real world, and be prepared to fight it or trap it again. The risk here is that he does not know how many demons are trapped in each of those unknown pages. They could all be released at once. They could kill him and release the rest of the demons.

 

It is up to the player to decide which is the better method to investigate.

Edited by Wai

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Orymus3    18821

That's a very interesting approach to books. Unfortunately, most suggestions imply that most of the 'action' would either occur from UI-play or be a central part of the game. I'm mostly looking for tools that have a direct effect on gameplay such as 'press A, slash your sword' kind of interaction.

If I'm to include books at all, I need to have 3 solid standalone actions when pressing a key.

 

 

1 - Would be a nice way to explain inventory as a whole, but it's mostly just theme-related, not an actual gameplay role per se.

2 - Not bad, but it comes with a system, I'm actually trying to keep things simple. The focus is really on the tools you gather and what they can do.

3 - It's a nice twist, I might consider it, though my current 'warp-mechanic' works well.

4 - Kinda like the magic mirror in ALTTP I presume?

5 - I'd rather keep bossfights a surprise (why not try instead of pretend?)

6 - Possibly, though I already have a talking sword for this purpose.

7 - Would this be a passive effect on the usual map system? I'm afraid I don't plan on using a quest-based approach...

8 - That was a neat mechanic, but it would require a game centered around this book concept. I like the limited approach, which forces some decisions, and I particularly enjoy the risk/reward of jumping into the book to defeat the demons and risk remaining trapped (it sounds worse than death).

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jbadams    25676


Any idea how I might implement some form of fragmentation grenade in a low fantasy medieval setting?

Black/gun powder?  Something magic?

 


In what way do you feel candles would be superior to a torch specifically? I'm not aware of any properties 'wax' might have, but you seem to be hinting that it might.

I don't think they're superior in general -- if you're just after good lighting or an ignition source they're inferior -- I was suggesting them as an additional item rather than a replacement for a torch.  They have some potential uses that a torch might not though -- you might need a more subtle light-source, or multiple light-sources, or as mentioned they may be required for certain rituals.  I didn't have any specific properties of wax in mind, but figured anything might make a potential spell ingredient.  Wax could also be used to contain things or to coat something that would otherwise be dangerous to handle directly.

 


Interesting. Are you aware of any trope where this would be applicable?

Unfortunately I can't remember the specific example, but I do recall encountering a monster in an AD&D campaign which was vulnerable to glass weapons.

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Orymus3    18821

 


Any idea how I might implement some form of fragmentation grenade in a low fantasy medieval setting?

Black/gun powder?  Something magic?

 

 

 


In what way do you feel candles would be superior to a torch specifically? I'm not aware of any properties 'wax' might have, but you seem to be hinting that it might.

I don't think they're superior in general -- if you're just after good lighting or an ignition source they're inferior -- I was suggesting them as an additional item rather than a replacement for a torch.  They have some potential uses that a torch might not though -- you might need a more subtle light-source, or multiple light-sources, or as mentioned they may be required for certain rituals.  I didn't have any specific properties of wax in mind, but figured anything might make a potential spell ingredient.  Wax could also be used to contain things or to coat something that would otherwise be dangerous to handle directly.

 

 

 


Interesting. Are you aware of any trope where this would be applicable?

Unfortunately I can't remember the specific example, but I do recall encountering a monster in an AD&D campaign which was vulnerable to glass weapons.

 

 

I'm trying to keep this exempt from gun powder if possible (given that there won't be guns to begin with), and my low-level setting assumes that magic is extremely rare so the player will rely upon artifacts most of the time. I assume I could have these consumable artifacts that explode upon being cast, but it does beg the question: why not bombs? If magic artifacts are so rare and valuable, using consumable ones instead of more mainstream explosives might appear a bit odd.

 

Glass might have a too narrow purpose unless I tap into some serious trope. Possibly gems though (I seem to have googled up something interesting about the properties of some gemstones). 

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Thaumaturge    3826

I've only skimmed this topic, so my apologies if this has already been raised but one thing that might be worth mentioning is that, depending on the lore that you go with, a sword--especially one that can cut effectively--might make a good choice, as beheading is a not-uncommon means of either slaying or slowing supernatural creatures, if I'm not much mistaken. Offhand, I recall stories about killing vampires in this way and revenants of one sort or another being prevented in this way (behead the corpse before burial, and in some cases place the head between the corpse's knees, in order that it not rise to plague the living).

 

Additional measures--burning especially--may be called for, but a beheading is generally a good start. (Indeed, some sort of magical/alchemical bottled fire might be another good addition to the hunter's arsenal.)

 

Other weapons than a sword might work--an axe or polearm especially.

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Orymus3    18821

I find myself often trying to stay clear from the sword given that it's an over-used weapon, oftentimes without much reason or purpose.

I'm very glad you brought up its usefulness here, as I tend to overlook the sword as being a viable option. I thought the hunter would be more of a crossbow/axe kind of hybrid, but sword may very well be more efficient.

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