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Metalbreath

Game Designer vs Team Arguments

7 posts in this topic

Hello everyone,

 

*(Im not sure if this post is for Beginner Section or Production&Management, so feel free to move it if you think I ve posted it on the wrong Section)*

I ve worked with couple of indie teams as a Game Designer/Team Management. 

Before I join a team, I always let them know that I will argue with ideas they have and I eager them to argue with my ideas.

 

I think as a Game Designer its crucial to listen what my team thinks about what I write and what ideas they have because,

through the arguments many small and unexpected ideas may pop up.

 

But when the team hears the word "argument" they take it as a negative attitude. Which is not what I am intended to project.

 

I personally think that its important aspect for writing the GDD. 

 

What are your ideas on this matter?

 

Should I eager my team to feel comfortable to argue with me? Should I not use the word at all and expect them to react when they dont like something?(Although this may cause "shy" members to never express the dislike for a feature and a great idea may goes to waste)

 

Should I use a different approach?

 

How do you deal with this matter with your team?

 

Thank you for taking the time and reading my post.

 

Regards

Andreas

Edited by Metalbreath
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But when the team hears the word "argument" they take it as a negative attitude. Which is not what I am intended to project.

 

The word [I]discuss[/I] is the standard.  "I want to encourage us to discuss anything that you may feel needs it,"  and similar words are welcoming.  Most people do not want to argue.  Argue is NOT the same thing as debate.  I suggest that you not even use the word debate because that will happen naturally.  You can not force issues or use unique jargon which you solely prefer and expect yourself to have good leadership.  A leader talks the talk of the team and if need be will adapt and drop own preferences to do so.  The team will at least subconsciously discern that and you will gain respect.  Be colloquial and friendly.

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Thank you for your replies.

My intentions are to project a friendly image.

I was using the word "argue" because yes it means you trying to convince someone something. But as well that you provide facts about it.

I didn't want my team to start saying.... "i want an elephant on the tree" - "why?" - "i like it".
I would prefer fact as " I think an elephant on the tree will good because he will attract player attention and he will notice the hidden treasure" (example)

And visa versa. When I suggest a feature to have a constructive argument(discuss)
On why they don't think it will be a good idea.

My aim is to create a playable, fun and selling game.
That is why I focus on facts that can gelp the game.

I guess you are guys are right. I will have to use a more friendly tone. Throw few smilies every now and then heh :)

I will follow your advices.
Much appreciated!
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*(Im not sure if this post is for Beginner Section or Production&Management, so feel free to move it if you think I ve posted it on the wrong Section)*
I ve worked with couple of indie teams as a Game Designer/Team Management.


For Beginners is a technical forum, so I'm moving it to P&M.
 

Should I eager my team to feel comfortable to argue with me?


I'm guessing English is not your primary language (thus you may not have appreciated the connotations of the word "argue"). As others said, don't refer to their ideas and suggestions and comments as "arguing." And certainly you should never argue with their ideas and suggestions and comments. You may not adopt all their suggestions, but always react gratefully to all input. If someone says he thinks it would be fun to have elephants in trees, he ought to say why, but if he doesn't, don't demand a reason - you can just say, "that sounds fun!" That doesn't mean you're going to add elephants in trees. Edited by Tom Sloper
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@Frob

Thank you for the long description suggestions and tips. :)

 

@Tom Sloper

You are right. English is not my primary language. Even though I use it more often than my primary language (Greek).

 

I understand, I should always respond with  positive and friendly answer. 

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