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free private SVN with biggest disk space?

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hi guys

I'm looking for best free SVN server, but private so guests cannot view the code.

something like "dropbox" but for SVN and more free space (at least 5GB+)

anyone knows such sites?

thanks in advance

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I'm not aware of an SVN hoster that offer that amount of space for free. Yet it shouldn't be too expensive to buy a plan that meets your requirements, probably around 10€/month.

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Yep, most flexible free solution is to host it yourself laugh.png Leave a PC on 24/7 running the SVN daemon, and tell your router to forward the SVN ports on to that PC.


pretty much this, i use VisualSVN as the server, and it's pretty straight forward setup. of course this means you either need an isp that gives you a public ip address(ours isn't technically a static address, but it hasn't been changed in over a year).

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If it's for personal use, you can just have it on your local network with no need for a static address.

Ofcourse, leaving a PC on for 24/7 that you otherwise wouldn't be using can cost a pretty penny depending on your electrical costs in your area - it might even be higher than the $10 a month you'd be paying to online hosts.

 

You can configure your devices so they automaticly turn off during the night and then turn back on, but even so, compare your power bills for a few months to double-check that everything's good.

(You can also configure your devices so they aren't pulling power for unneccesary tasks and unneccesary hardware - you don't need a videocard and monitor hooked up to a server)

Edited by Servant of the Lord

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You're probably not going to find that for free.

 

I use Dreamhost for my web-hosting plan -- I don't use them for Version Control, but they do have 1-click SVN install as an option. Disk space / bandwidth limits are high enough to be effectively unlimited for any reasonable purpose. I pay around $10 USD / month.

 

Another option would be a VPS or similar. There are many options for hosts, but the one I like best is Digital Ocean -- you can get an instance with 1CPU / 512MB RAM /20GB storage / 1TB traffic per month for just $5 -- and they actually bill hourly, so you don't pay if you take it down for any reason. For $10/mo, you get 1CPU/ 1GB RAM /30GB storage /2TB traffic. Either plan would be enough to run a version control system and then some -- maybe webhosting, a bug tracker, and a nightly build system if you were so inclined.

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I also recommend digitalocean - they are very cheap and the uptime has been great.

 

You can have an svn server up and running on a debian instance in minutes and pay very little per month. I think I pay $5 for mine, but i don't put my version control on it - my repositories are stored in a git repository on a local linux server managed by a commercial program called atlassian stash which has a one-off price of $10.

 

You might want to look into installing a similar system for svn as it simplifies creation of repositories and security etc, rather than having to do it all from the command-line. Were you thinking of a windows, or a *nix server to host the svn on?

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I also use Assembla, though I pay $9 (about £6 for me) per month for access to the integrated ticketing and project management stuff on there, as well as increased SVN space. If it's going to be something I use every day then paying a small fee for good quality service is worth it.

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For those who find this now, the OP actually had the solution. Dropbox + SVN is a fine solution and one that my team has been using for awhile now. Once you have Dropbox installed on your machine you can create an SVN workspace within that folder and checkin/out files as normal. It's nice when you get 100 gigs for $9.00 dollars a month and it spans across your team. Of course unless you have the business Dropbox that has multiple users you have to make sure you trust your team with your dropbox account information to get access to the SVN repo. 

 

You can use this to help

 

http://foyzulkarim.blogspot.com/2012/12/dropbox-as-svn-repository.html

 

Thanks, 

   -Anthony

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Another vote for Assembla, it looks like their free plans cover what was asked for, except only 1GB instead of 5GB.   Also, they support the site (see the bottom of every page for their link with a special gamedev promo code) so that's a good reason to send them a thank you note, if nothing else.

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Aside from the free personal plan, Assembla offers a paid plan for $14 a month, featuring integrated ticketing and robust project management, as well as SVN, git, and Perforce Hosting (P4) for really big files - 3D models, video, graphics, etc. 

 

It also include:

  • Collaborative Code Review & Merge
  • Supports stream depots
  • Offers Team & Branch Permissions

Here's the free trail link:  https://www.assembla.com/game-developers

Edited by LarryR

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Yep, most flexible free solution is to host it yourself laugh.png Leave a PC on 24/7 running the SVN daemon, and tell your router to forward the SVN ports on to that PC.



Alternatively, it's free to rent a private host in the amazon cloud with 5GB of storage (for the first 12 months).



[edit] as pointed out below this can be as expensive as renting a server/service -- A 250W PC * 0.15c/kWh * 24hrs * 30days = ~$27/month -- so check your utility rates and look into low-power PCs to use as the server biggrin.png

Instead of a PC you can use a NAS too (best to use a NAS with RAID for data security). Many NAS (e.g. qnap) have a solid power management including a spin-down of the harddisks.

 

If the NAS is not able to handle SVN (either it does not allow installation of SVN or the processor is not powerful enough), you can still use it as simple data storage for your repository (much like a cloud-storage) and install SVN on your dev-machine. Thought this will not be really useful in a multi-user environment.

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[edit] as pointed out below this can be as expensive as renting a server/service -- A 250W PC * 0.15c/kWh * 24hrs * 30days = ~$27/month -- so check your utility rates and look into low-power PCs to use as the server

For comparison: I'm running an old Core2 Duo linux based server at 65W and a new i5 QNAP NAS at 50W (measured during idle but rotating HDDs), each one with 4 HDDs in RAID 1+0. When disks get parked during low access frequency times, the values drop accordingly.

Edited by haegarr

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Yep, most flexible free solution is to host it yourself laugh.png Leave a PC on 24/7 running the SVN daemon, and tell your router to forward the SVN ports on to that PC.

 

Alternatively, it's free to rent a private host in the amazon cloud with 5GB of storage (for the first 12 months).

 

[edit] as pointed out below this can be as expensive as renting a server/service -- A 250W PC * 0.15c/kWh * 24hrs * 30days = ~$27/month -- so check your utility rates and look into low-power PCs to use as the server biggrin.png

You get a few zeroes wrong there? Looks like you forget some of the magnitude differences in the units.

 

http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=250W+*+0.15c%2FkWh+*+1+month

 

"250 W (watts)×0.15¢/kW·h (US cents per kilowatt hour)×1 month"

"27.40¢ (US cents)"

 

If you have the hardware, internet, etc. already, then not so pricey (assuming that 0.15c/kWh is right, I don't personally pay direct so not even sure for my own country).

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You get a few zeroes wrong there? Looks like you forget some of the magnitude differences in the units.

Yes, he was using the wrong units.  Consumer electricity rates are about 15 cents per kilowatt-hour, not 0.15 cents.  The final answer of almosdt 30 USD per month was correct.

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Didn't see anyone mentioning this (often overlooked) detail:

 

A very important part of having your files hosted is also security.

Not from theft, but from things like flooding, fire and disk/hardware failure.

 

If you choose to host it on your own hardware, you should make sure to protect your data from those issues too, they are actually a lot more likely to happen, then someone trying to steal your files.

 

Add the hardware for it (or separate online service), and hassle of that, to the electricity bill, and suddenly 10-20 bucks per month isn't that expensive anymore.

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You get a few zeroes wrong there? Looks like you forget some of the magnitude differences in the units.

Yes, he was using the wrong units.  Consumer electricity rates are about 15 cents per kilowatt-hour, not 0.15 cents.  The final answer of almosdt 30 USD per month was correct.

 

Note that this is entirely based upon location as well, as the average rate in the United States is only 9.84 cents, with a few states hitting 15, and poor Hawaii at 34 sad.png While this data is from 2013, for my state it is still much higher than the rate we are charged. This is due to possibly different regions inside a state having varying costs as well. During winter I start at 5.5 and decrease to 4.6, and summer is 5.5 to 9.5.

 

Taking the average of all three power rates per month for me it comes out to about $130.. so basically the same price as paying a $10 service. 

 

Since there is a computer running as a simple network drive for easy file sharing that won't suck up data usage it made sense for me to shove svn onto that computer. Sure I could get a free private repository someplace, or even pay for one, but for me this seemed like the best option with what I had. Plus at the time I wanted to learn how to do it just on the off chance I needed to do something similar later on.

 

My biggest gripes deal with the web interface for CollabNet. Sometimes it doesn't load properly so I have to manually start it, or do a quick reboot every now and then. Adding user permissions is tedious as well. Not that this process takes more than a few minutes, it just requires me to manually find the entry, write their name ect. Paying a service that does this all automagically would definitely be alot easier.

 

Other than that the remaining annoyances for me are just small things. Storms are of an equal concern as any other electronic device in the house. Gotta remember to turn it off/back on, just in case. General maintenance to make sure everything seems alright and the drives are running ok, and so on.

 

When I change locations here in about a year and a half though I am definitely going to just pay someone to host. There are features that I want but don't want to spend hours setting them up. Or some I just weren't able to get working at all. Sending a commit email I see as beneficial when working in a team, but I wasn't able to properly setup SMTP. It's just easier to have someone else handle that for me smile.png

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I use atlsssian stash running on a repurposed laptop. I have the screen permanently open, to prevent overheating and I have several USB drives plugged in. It acts as a wireless access point and as a server hosting email, git, Web and a bunch of other stuff. I'd say that costs me near nothing in electric and the solar panels on the roof could probably run it. The laptop cost me near nothing too as I got it on eBay by purposefully searching for laptops that had broken screens but were otherwise fine. These laptops go for near nothing as new screens are expensive compared to the laptop. As it happened the screen only had a few dead pixels anyway. Double win!

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Deveo (https://deveo.com) offers 1GB free disk space from cloud, after which the exceeding storage is priced relatively cheaply (1€/GB/month). There's issue tracker and Wiki in addition to plain SVN hosting. It might be better to spend 4€ / month and avoid all the configuration hassle.

 

Disclaimer: I work at Deveo.

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Instead of a PC you can use a NAS too [...] 
If the NAS is not able to handle SVN (either it does not allow installation of SVN or the processor is not powerful enough), you can still use it as simple data storage for your repository (much like a cloud-storage) and install SVN on your dev-machine. Thought this will not be really useful in a multi-user environment.

 

Why not use tortoise svn in that case. Free and space is limited to your hard drive capacity.

 

Those two, definitively. There is really no sane reason to do anything different if you do not need to share your code with people you don't know. Which, as you said, is explicitly not desired.

 

  1. Local harddisk with TortoiseSVN is 15 seconds setup, and as fast and easy as you can get. Note that it's also as easy as you can get to accidentially delete the repo, so be sure to make backups.
  2. NAS with TortoiseSVN via simple SMB shares or iSCSI is practically the same speed (SMB is somewhat slower, no noticeable difference with iSCSI due to its excellent caching), and it's 2 minutes of setup. Cost for a reasonably good (not stellar) NAS with reasonable storage is very manageable, although I'll admit it can get expensive if you feel like having the biggest, best thing.
  3. Running SVN on the NAS is possible, but I find it actually inferior because the management interfaces are rather spartanic, and at least on Synology the SVN server is noticeably slower than using file protocol over iSCSI (probably due to the ARM CPU being on the weakish side?). Still, if you need to share your code with other people who access your NAS via VPN, that's the way to go. DynDNS, VPN, and SVN ready-to-go is like 5 minutes of setup, no skills required. With scheduled backup plan, it's like 6 minutes.

 

While I do see the merits of having data on a public server (if the situation demands for it) and while I do see the temptations of the almighty cloud, I find it stunning how the first thought most people nowadays seem to have for any kind of problem is "remote server", and "cloud". It is not automatically an invalid option, but in my opinion it should be the last, not the first consideration.

 

Maybe I'm just getting too old. I recently talked with someone who has one of these fitness trackers that monitors him 24/7, and you guessed it, the data goes right into the cloud. Heck, not only do I not see the merit of that or the technical reason, but I wouldn't even want to have a company with an obscure privacy policy (which they'll likely break anyway) plus in principle the entire world being able to access my vital parameters every day of my life, like when am I sleeping or when is my heartbeat so-and-so-fast... not everything needs to be accessible online, or should be. I don't see the merit of being able open my window shades or turn the lights on, or unlock the front door via the internet either (yep, no joke, this is something one of those smart home guys actually tried to sell to me, stunningly ingenious idea that, remotely unlocking the front door).

Edited by samoth

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Yes you're getting too old just like me. :)

I own one of those fitness trackers which synchronises to remote servers and it has the advantage like everything else mobile that if you lose the device you can still get another and continue with the same data exactly where you left off.

When it comes to backing up small data sets like contacts and emails cloud based systems are great. Most of these encrypt your data with a key only you have, and if you don't remember the key you lose access, this is how my cloud backups on crashplan are. The fitbit data however yes, I guess they could nefsrously abuse my fitness (unfitness? lol) data. Am I particularly bothered? Nope not really. :)

If it was my tax and financial information I'd be concerned though...

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