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tom76

Help - How To Approach Game Companies

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tom76    122
ok so I''ve got this demo, looking quite good and all that, and I now want to approach some games companies locally and try to get a job. What''s the best way to do this? Should I email them, phone them up, turn up on their doorstep (some are out of the way), what would be best? Any help much appreciated. I DO have a website for my game, I know this helps a lot especially thumbnail pics for those busy HR chaps to look over. Many thanks, Daniel

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Anthrax    122
Go to www.Blizzard.com. They provide tips on how apply for a job in thier company. They provide tips on how to write a resume, what to add in it, etc. You can take a few ideas and learn from there. You can try to amend those points to your needs.

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S1CA    1418
Based on people who''ve contacted us on spec:

e-mail them to ask if they''re hiring at the moment. Try to hunt out the relevent e-mail address if you can. If you can''t find one, send an initial e-mail to whatever address they have on their website (info@topcompany.com) asking who you should contact about jobs. (Mention the type of job in that e-mail, programming, art etc - often you''ll get the relevent directors e-mail address [technical director, art director etc])

Phoning is ok, but you''re less likely to get through to anyone of importance, and nerves often mean you don''t get everything across properly (an e-mail suits everyone and you can be 100% sure everything is correct before you send it).

*Don''t* send any big attachments without asking first, tell them in the e-mail you can send samples if necessary. Do tell them the download URL for any stuff in that first e-mail.

*Don''t* be too familiar with them - keep things professional - writing an e-mail which sounds like a drunken ICQ message to a mate isn''t going to impress them. There is fun and jokery in the industry, but at the end of the day it''s a profession.

*Don''t* take things personally - if they say they have no vacancies at the moment (even if they''re advertising that they do!) - don''t be upset, and importantly *DON''T* hassle them too much about WHY they won''t employ you. A follow up e-mail or phone call is fine. 2 follow ups is probably pushing it.



--
Simon O''''Connor
Creative Asylum Ltd
www.creative-asylum.com

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tom76    122
Thanks S1CA, very useful information (as always).

"I envy you, who has seen it all"
"And I, young sir, envy you, who have yet to see it for the first time..."
- Daniel Glenfield
1st October 2001

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a2k    124
also, remember, if you don''t get a response from your email in about, say, a week or so, you can politely send another email requesting the status of your job inquiry. this will show persistence and the desire to get the job. but don''t send too many. it could get annoying.

a2k

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tom76    122
Thanks for your advice everyone. I''ll have to post my website for my demo sometime soon so people have have a looksie.

"I envy you, who has seen it all"
"And I, young sir, envy you, who have yet to see it for the first time..."
- Daniel Glenfield
1st October 2001

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LordKronos    122
quote:
Original post by S1CA
*Don''t* take things personally - if they say they have no vacancies at the moment (even if they''re advertising that they do!) - don''t be upset, and importantly *DON''T* hassle them too much about WHY they won''t employ you. A follow up e-mail or phone call is fine. 2 follow ups is probably pushing it.



Generally good advice, but sometimes it might take some persistance. I have heard of one company (I think it was a marketing company) where their standard hiring policy was to turn a prospective candidate down. If he inquired about a job a second time, they would turn him down again. If he inquired a third time, he was hired. I really have to wonder exactly how many people this company ended up hiring. But I guess if they were into marketing/sales, those are the signs of a good marking exec/salesperson.

Is this a game company? No. Just a little story that persistance sometimes does pay off.

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Tacit    122
Hmm...this seems like a ridiculous hiring policy. Sure, persistence is important but think of how many capable candidates you''ve lost, because maybe another company they applied to did answer them after the first time. Seems like a good way to end up with all the dregs.

But hey...I''m not in HR, and I''ve never really found it to make much sense to begin with.

R.

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tom76    122
Thanks to everyone who gave some input, I never knew there was so much to it lol.

Oh well, here goes nothing

"I envy you, who has seen it all"
"And I, young sir, envy you, who have yet to see it for the first time..."
- Daniel Glenfield
1st October 2001

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tom76    122
Almost a week has gone by and a very lukewarm reception so far.
Does my demo look that bad?
www.angelfire.com/games4/glensoft

I''m not sending my CV with my email, just a basic "hey I saw your company and thought I''d like to work there" sort of letter, showing I''d researched the company etc.


"I envy you, who has seen it all"
"And I, young sir, envy you, who have yet to see it for the first time..."
- Daniel Glenfield
1st October 2001

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Hikeeba    122
I don''t think the demo looks bad, but is there a way to download it?

Other than that, I think you should change the background on the web page. It hurt my eyes trying to read the text.

I wanna'' ride on the pope mobile.

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Obscure    175
Well from reading your post and looking at the web site I am afraid your are doing a bad job of selling yourself.

1. You say you are looking for a job (in house I assume) but the web site talks as if you are a company. This is a mixed message that will put people off. The site needs to be YOUR personal site, not a company site. It needs to give details of you and your abilities (your CV) and say something about the demo (feature list).

2. Web site presentation - this is very messy. It makes it hard to read the text or focus on the screen shots. Get rid of the "Glensoft" text background, have a proper feature list for the game, put relevant text next to screenshots, telling the viewer what they are seeing.

3. Why didn''t you send your CV? Big mistake. Most companies get dozens of job applications per week. With most they:
i. open them,
ii. read the CV,
iii. Make a decision,
iv. Send reject or arrange interview.

With you they have no CV so they know nothing about you. They either have to write to you and wait for you to send a CV or take the easy option of picking one of the other applicants and just sending you a reject letter.

4. You should also supply the demo and explain to them the features of the game, what is good about it and also what is bad about it - show you know what is wrong and that given time these could be fixed.

Hope that all helps. Afraid it is tough getting a job in the industry even at entry level so you just have to keep on trying. Good luck.


Dan Marchant
Obscure Productions

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tom76    122
I''ve not had any complaints about the background of the site, but I''ve rectified it now.
I didn''t send my CV but I made it clear in my cover letter that I already have experience in the industry, and that I''d produced a demo. I gave them contact details and to be fair I have been asked for my CV by a couple of places, and am waiting for them to get back to me.

I''ll see if I can get Dark Mantra available for download. I''ve never had much luck setting up things like that on Angelfire.

And of course I didn''t send them the demo - companies hate having large attatchments without permission being given.

"I envy you, who has seen it all"
"And I, young sir, envy you, who have yet to see it for the first time..."
- Daniel Glenfield
1st October 2001

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