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Boder

What is your development environment?

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I wanted to take the pulse of the different tools people are using for their projects. I've tried quite a few languages, libraries, and IDEs so I just want to see what is currently working for people (and what isn't).

 

If you could, post:

1. Your OS

2. Target OS/Device

3. Language and IDE (or name of editor/compiler)

4. Libraries/Packages/Whatev you call 'em

5. Type of project (game/tool/2D/3D/team project/solo/free/pay)

6. Most importantly, what you don't like about the setup and also some of the highlights

 

Thanks all.

 

I have Windows 8 now and I'm going to be setting up some development tools. I've used many, many C/C++ IDEs, Java to a lesser extent, I only really checked out what was possible with Python and C#.

 

Anyone using C# with OpenGL or is that unheard of? How about Java and OpenGL? C# and SDL? Is C# still only for Windows builds?

Edited by Boder

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1. Win7

2. Win7+

3. C++11 and Visual Studio 2012

4. DirectXTK and Lua

5. Rendering Framework

6. Nothing - I am content with the tools that I am using, which is why I chose them :P

 

I am using Direct3D 11, so my use case may not be what you are looking for.  But anyways, the entire tool chain is free, so it is at least an option for beginners or indies.

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1. Mac OS X.
2. Mac OS X initially, but I am keeping an eye on portability.
3. Language: C++. Editor: Emacs. Compiler: LLVM.
4. SFML.
5. 2D platformer developed in my scarce spare time, together with a couple of friends with similarly loose commitment.
6. Nothing - I am content with the tools that I am using, which is why I chose them. tongue.png

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Álvaro,

Have you tried using IDEs and found them not to your liking? Or are you just a purist who come hell or high water will still be bumping uglies with the machine/power tools?

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Álvaro,
Have you tried using IDEs and found them not to your liking? Or are you just a purist who come hell or high water will still be bumping uglies with the machine/power tools?


I used Borland IDEs in the 90s and they were OK. The current IDEs seem way too complicated to me and I refuse to learn them because I don't see the point. But the real reason why I use Emacs and a command-line compiler is that it's what we do at work, so I am used to it. For what I've seen, Visual C++ seems very good, but I am not a Windows guy.

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1. Linux, specifically Debian 8 (also called Debian Jessie or Testing, depending on who you ask).

 

2. Also Debian, or simply put, whatever runs on my netbook too.

 

3. Java, Eclipse 4.4, and JEdit for GLSL (with GLSL syntax highlighting).

 

4. OpenGL 3.3 + few extensions. LWJGL (Java OpenGL bindings). SnakeYAML. HPPC (primitive collections among other things). Tiny pieces of LibGDX (few math functions that I haven't implemented myself and in the future I will be using its Bullet bindings). Oh, and dustArtemis obviously :P (entity system component framework, look at my sig).

 

5. Not sure yet. 3D first person game I guess. Solo.

 

6. Eclipse is a bit slow here and there, and I can't create branches with MercurialEclipse plugin (I do that stuff through bitbucket's site).Off the top of my head, those are all complaints I have. I'm pretty happy with my setup so far.

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1. Windows 7 32bit
2. Windows (and later Mac and Linux)
3. C++, MinGW, and QtCreator
4. SFML, Qt, Boost. I haven't yet decided whether to go with Lua or AngelScript for scripting.
5. 2D turn-based para-historical fantasy RPG, and the world editor used to make it.
6. QtCreator is very nice and works very well for me, and I like MinGW - it stays up to date with adding most of the latest C++ features. My biggest complaint is compile times (a flaw of C++), and the poor quality debugging tools. As a Windows user running Linux programming tools, I feel like a second-class citizen to both Microsoft and to the Linux crowd. The MinGW's gdb works but imperfectly, and I've never been able to get breaks on thrown exceptions (only 'caught' ones, but breaking on catches does me little good!), no good stacktracing integration into my own code, Valgrind isn't on windows, and so on.

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1. Arch Linux
2. Linux, Mac, Windows
3. C++(11), KDevelop
4. SDL2, OpenGL, GLEW, GLM
5. Currently learning some more rendering stuff, so I'd say a rendering framework is what I'm working on right now.
6. KDevelop used to have few silly crashes, but seems like those are fixed in the newest version. I went through all kinds of editors before KDevelop and found that this is the most suitable for me. QtCreator would probably be my second choice.

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It's interesting to see so many non-windows users.

For my private (learning) projects
1. Linux
2. Just for myself, so linux
3. Mostly C++, some GLSL, and Cuda. Compiler is GCC, IDE is codeblocks, version control is GIT (if needed)
4. Depends heavily on the project, but these are the most common: OpenGL, Boost, wxWidgets, TinyXML, ImageMagick, Cuda
5. Various private learning projects; Solo; Usually s.th. with computer graphics or computer vision in it
6. Servant is quite right about the debugging tools. It is probably not so much a problem of GDB, but rather of the frontends for it. IMO, the debugger(frontends) in Visual Studio and xCode are significantly better. Also, the tools for the debugging and profiling of GPU stuff is not even close to what you have on the consoles.

Btw @Servant: For breaking on thrown exceptions you need a "catchpoint", not a "breakpoint". See for example http://www.delorie.com/gnu/docs/gdb/gdb_31.html

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1. Ubuntu
2. Ubuntu (desktop/laptop/tablet/phone/convertibles)
3. vim, g++, python, shell
4. many and various
5. a free OS shell that uses whizzbang eye candy, and supporting applications that run on it
6. "read the code" is not documentation, arrogance is not a design pattern, NIH is not a recipe for success
 

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