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tmason

OpenGL Request for Explanation of Light Half Vector ...

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Hello,

I have been trying to get my head around light half-vectors for a minute now but I still don't understand it. Here is what I found on a StackExchange article:

Link: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3744038/what-is-half-vector-in-modern-glsl
 

Quote

http://www.lighthouse3d.com/opengl/glsl/index.php?ogldir2 reports that half vector in OpenGL context is 'Eye position - Light position' but then it goes on to say 'luckily OpenGL calculates it for us' [which is now deprecated].

How can, practically be calculated (a simple example would be greatly appreciated) [mainly, it puzzles me what "Eye" is and how it can be derived].

At the moment I managed to make specular calculations work (with good visual result) with half vector being equal to Light where Light is



vec3 Light = normalize(light_position - vec3(out_Vertex));
Now, I've no idea why that worked.

[If at least I knew what "Eye" is and how it can be derived practically.]

 


My two questions are:

  • In the above code, is the "out_Vertex" the vPosition that is coming in for the geometry?
  • I don't have a light position in my GLSL shader but it seems based on the above example I need one. Am I correct? Or do I need to send a light position to the GLSL fragment shader as well?

Thank you for any input you can provide on this.

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My two questions are:

  • In the above code, is the "out_Vertex" the vPosition that is coming in for the geometry?
  • I don't have a light position in my GLSL shader but it seems based on the above example I need one. Am I correct? Or do I need to send a light position to the GLSL fragment shader as well?

Thank you for any input you can provide on this.

 

Half vector is usually said for the formula "normalize( lightDir + viewDir );"

That's all.

 

Now, to get the light direction, you may already have it (i.e. directional lights have a user-specified direction but no direction) or you may have to calculate it (i.e. point lights have position but no direction, thus lightDir = out_Vertex - lightPos)

viewDir is the camera's direction, so you already have that value.

 

Now, what is out_Vertex depends on what space you deal everything. If the light position is in object space, then out_Vertex should be the input vertex position from the vertex shader. If light is in world position then out_Vertex should be the input vertex position multiplied by the world matrix. If it's in view space, it should be input vertex position multiplied by the world-view matrix.

 

I suggest that you read the Programming Vertex, Geometry and Pixel Shaders book which was once hosted in GameDev.net

It has an entire chapter dedicated to lighting and should contain everything you want and need to know about lighting. If you google enough, there's also a convenient PDF version of it.

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viewDir is the camera's direction, so you already have that value.

I think this is not true. viewDir should be the vector from the lit pixel's position to the camera's position - this is different from the camera's "lookAt" direction, if that's what you meant. I made this mistake too at first.


1. In the above code, is the "out_Vertex" the vPosition that is coming in for the geometry?

Yes. Lighting is usually done in world-space, so this is usually the world-space position.

 


2. I don't have a light position in my GLSL shader but it seems based on the above example I need one. Am I correct? Or do I need to send a light position to the GLSL fragment shader as well?

Yes and no... You shouldn't send the light position into the fragment shader. It is better to compute the lightDir vector in the vertex shader, and pass that into the fragment shader. The pipeline will interpolate the lightDir vector across the surface of each triangle linearly before passing it to the fragment shader, so you will have to re-normalize it in the fragment shader. And I think the same goes for all other vectors used in the lighting formula...

Edited by tonemgub

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Never did say thank you for the replies!

 

I will go through these but it seems like this is what I was looking for; thank you.

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viewDir is the camera's direction, so you already have that value.

I think this is not true. viewDir should be the vector from the lit pixel's position to the camera's position - this is different from the camera's "lookAt" direction, if that's what you meant. I made this mistake too at first.

Oops. You're right my mistake.

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