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Thaumaturge

Fixed-position, free-rotation view-point: one image or several?

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(I'm not sure of whether this fits better here or in the "Visual Arts" sub-forum; my apologies if I've placed it incorrectly. ^^; )

 

I'm working on a prototype of a node-based, fixed-position, free-rotation gameplay mechanic, in the vein of the later Myst games, and I find myself uncertain of how to proceed.

 

Specifically, presuming that I don't go with a real-time 3D environment (which is still an open point, admittedly), and thus use a 2D backdrop, would it be better to use a single, huge image (much wider than tall), or several smaller images (closer to square, placed side-by-side)? (In the latter case I would most likely not arrange the images on the faces of cube or similar shape, either placing them on the inside of a cylinder or simply side-by-side in two dimensions, and so I'm not terribly worried about the distortion that a cubic arrangement might incur, as in cube-maps.)

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This is part a bump, and in part an update to the question:

 

Looking at this post (the second-to-last paragraph, specifically), am I correct in guessing that I should use multiple images, and aim for an image aspect ratio that would cause the images to take up somewhere around a third to a half of the screen's width? (The idea being to use a small number of textures, but also reduce the amount of texture that goes unused by virtue of being off-screen.) Am I missing anything?

Edited by Thaumaturge

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I doubt it'll matter either way. My main concern with one huge image is that you might run into some texture size limitations on some platforms. Otherwise, I doubt you're likely to notice any difference between the two techniques. 

 

And also, it should be possible for you to author your images as one big image, and then split it into many smaller images in your data build pipeline. So this should be something where you can switch back and forth between the two techniques with relative ease if there really is a problem with one method, and you won't have to reauthor everything just to try the other method.

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My main concern with one huge image is that you might run into some texture size limitations on some platforms.

Well, that's a concern, and not one that I was terribly aware of; that seems like another reason to use multiple images rather than one. Thank you for mentioning it. ^_^

 

 

And also, it should be possible for you to author your images as one big image, and then split it into many smaller images in your data build pipeline.

True--and that is what I have in mind to do--but it affects my implementation somewhat.

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