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JLW

My teams all hate eachother.

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These people aren't acting professionally because they aren't professionals.

 

But before being professionals, they were indies. So, while rare, you still get to come across a few good individuals along the way.

I think the most important part is reminding how well/not well things went with each person individually (not whether the team broke).

See how some people contributed positively to the general project, and be sure to invite them on the next project.

 

Over 15 years back, I came across a guy, and I still involve him with some of my projects because he was a rare pearl with actual talent and an ability to deliver.

It might take you 50 projects before you find such a guy, but when you do, be sure to bring him in on any project that has some potential (and don't burn him on random projects though).

 

All in all, 3 failures is pretty small compared to what most successful developers will endure.

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Once upon a time, several coworkers and I talked about making a game in our free time (I work at a large game development studio, but we make games that we don't actually like to play ourselves). I got a basic skeleton of the game code thrown together, one of the artists whipped up some cool art, then everyone else lost motivation and I salvaged it as a simple tech demo.

What went wrong in our case?

- Everyone on the team (except for me) was only motivated by money. The main goal was to quickly throw together a vertical slice (fully functional demonstration of the core feature set) and then pitch it to management (so that we could get paid to work on it - at work), but we didn't even make it that far before everyone fizzled out, because we had...

- No leadership. We had the high-level picture of what we wanted to make, but NOBODY could agree on the details. If you can't agree on details, you can't actually implement them. Edited by Nypyren

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So... It's my fault then, for being socially inept?
I'd say it's either your fault for hiring useless programmers and artists i.e. your recruitment process sucks. OR, it's your fault for being really terrible at managing people. I can't suggest which without more information but ultimately if you're running the project, it is your fault regardless :)

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Of course, they won't let me use their resources now that they've left, not even concept art, so I have to completely restart.
And make sure you address this in future contracts. And make sure you have contracts!

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And make sure you address this in future contracts. And make sure you have contracts!


Trust me, lesson already learned.

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And make sure you address this in future contracts. And make sure you have contracts!

 

Or at the very minimum, lease of rights...

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Another thing you can do to help minimize these sort of problems -- especially with a volunteer team -- is to keep your team as small as possible.  Do you really need more than one programmer, and more than one concept artist?  Many hobbyists try to recruit large teams because they know that professional games are typically created by large teams, but the many successful indie developers tend to work with very small teams; just the minimum to cover all required skill-sets.

 

By keeping the team smaller you minimize the number of people to be dealt with, and the number of potentially clashing personalities.

 

 

Also take a read through the topic "what programmers want from a designer", there are some good posts in there that will probably be relevant to your situation.

We also recently published an article  "communication is a game development skill" that may be beneficial.

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Quick question just out of curiosity...

 

Your display name is "JustinS", which sort of suggests your name might be "Justin", and you keep referring to the fact that "you and Jeremy" are the designers on your team... but your profile also lists your real name as "Jeremy Williams"...  what's going on with that? huh.png

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Another thing you can do to help minimize these sort of problems -- especially with a volunteer team -- is to keep your team as small as possible.  Do you really need more than one programmer, and more than one concept artist?  Many hobbyists try to recruit large teams because they know that professional games are typically created by large teams, but the many successful indie developers tend to work with very small teams; just the minimum to cover all required skill-sets.
 
By keeping the team smaller you minimize the number of people to be dealt with, and the number of potentially clashing personalities.


I'd say this sounded like a good idea, if only I hadn't had a very small team the first two times ad got the same result. I actually got a larger team this time to see if taking some of the stress of them would help.
 

Also take a read through the topic "what programmers want from a designer", there are some good posts in there that will probably be relevant to your situation.

We also recently published an article  "communication is a game development skill" that may be beneficial.


I don't have time today, but I'll bookmark them.

Quick question just out of curiosity...

Your display name is "JustinS", which sort of suggests your name might be "Justin", and you keep referring to the fact that "you and Jeremy" are the designers on your team... but your profile also lists your real name as "Jeremy Williams"... what's going on with that? huh.png


That's a short, idiotic story. When I first made this account, Jeremy was in the room. I mentioned being hesitant to use my real name on the internet, and wondered if I'd have to on a more professional site. (Yes, I realize I don't have to now. Realized that within an hour of making the account.) Jeremy said I could use his because he didn't care about his name being on the internet. So I did. Then later I realized that was stupid, and changed it.

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I'd say this sounded like a good idea, if only I hadn't had a very small team the first two times ad got the same result. I actually got a larger team this time to see if taking some of the stress of them would help.

 

Now you've learned the problem isn't with the team size. However, a larger team isn't helping, so the suggestion is still valid.

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