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Game development for kids guide

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I think your article certainly covers a good range of game making products. It's nice to have the screenshots and cost comparisons there to get more of an idea what someone might be getting into and whether or not it looks like something they might be able to handle.

But I think, with the title, I was hoping for an article that was more something that covers a variety of game concepts that could be generally considered across those products. Maybe some basic stuff about screen co-ordinates, animation, collision, events, maybe a little bit about variables and calculations with them. Then taking these concepts and assembling them together to get something resembling a game.

 

A comprehensive 'how to' for each product like that would obviously get quite lengthy, but I'm thinking more about how things like variables, collisions, events, etc. tend to be common in game development and design and how thinking in terms of these concepts might be beneficial.
 

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You can take a peak at my introduction to programming if you want:

https://snapguide.com/guides/understand-computer-programming

I use the analogy of cooking to make things simple. This could be followed by a game programming guide.

The feedback on my guide is that it is easy to read, and easy to understand, even by someone who never cared to know a thing about programming.

I could help you with your presentation a little if you want.

An interactive iBook would be the ideal medium to present it through.

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I think your article certainly covers a good range of game making products. It's nice to have the screenshots and cost comparisons there to get more of an idea what someone might be getting into and whether or not it looks like something they might be able to handle.
But I think, with the title, I was hoping for an article that was more something that covers a variety of game concepts that could be generally considered across those products. Maybe some basic stuff about screen co-ordinates, animation, collision, events, maybe a little bit about variables and calculations with them. Then taking these concepts and assembling them together to get something resembling a game.
 
A comprehensive 'how to' for each product like that would obviously get quite lengthy, but I'm thinking more about how things like variables, collisions, events, etc. tend to be common in game development and design and how thinking in terms of these concepts might be beneficial.


Hi Kseh,

Thanks for the feedback.

That would certainly be useful, but it's a slightly different demographic than I was aiming for. I was thinking more in terms of preparing people (parents) to get their child started. In the end, specifics would be somewhat wasted on these people.

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Please keep in mind, this isn't the traditional "What programming language should I start with?" type document.  I already wrote one of those

 

You wrote that one?? blink.png

 

*claps silently*

 

 

 

Pretty much the go-to article if someone ever ask that question.

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Please keep in mind, this isn't the traditional "What programming language should I start with?" type document.  I already wrote one of those

 

You wrote that one?? blink.png

 

*claps silently*

 

 

 

Pretty much the go-to article if someone ever ask that question.

 

 

Thanks :)

 

That's why I wrote it.  I keep intended to update it, but truth is, the advice hasn't really changed all that much.  The Lua landscape changed a bit, Unity and Unreal got more popular, C++14 happened, Flash for browser continued to die, Haxe rose a bit, HTML5 got a bit better, Slick2D died and Python continued to stagnate and that's about it.  It's odd how the game dev world feels like so much is happening, but at a macro level, things are pretty much business as usual. :)

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Make that a follow up, maybe?

 

I actually thought about doing a site specifically for game dev with kids.  This has a few issues though.

 

1- COPPA

2- already pretty much out of time

 

 

I do think I will do a series or two on some of the topics I brushed on though.  Gamemaker is already pretty well supported, as is Scratch.  I have however considered doing a series on Construct2 or Stencyl, as both were really pleasant to work with while writing this.  They are very similar however, to the point I think one owes the other an apology. ;)

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