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Unduli

Unity OrientDB vs MongoDB + Neo4j

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Hi,

 

  I am currently working on GDD and TDD of a MMO browser game which has maps (based on realtime locations) for each location and also have a world map. Intend to use Isogenic Engine for isometric reasons and Isogenic Engine uses MongoDB by default for persistant world data.

 

 As I will also implement a shipping simulation (partly outlined here @ http://www.gamedev.net/topic/651608-cheapest-path-finding/ ) , decided to use a graph database as well hopefully making things easier, found Neo4j as it is quite popular.

 

  I was happy with MongoDB + Neo4J setup but then noticed OrientDB , which apparently acts like both MongoDB and Neo4J , they even have VS pages for MongoDB and Neo4J.

 

 Point is , I hear horror stories of MongoDB losing data (though not sure it still does) and I don't have such luxury. And for Neo4J , I am not big fan of 12K € per year "startup friendly" cost. OrientDB seems a viable option as there may be also be some opportunities of using one platform.

 

 In that case,  a logical move might be jumping to OrientDB but it has a small community and tbh didn't find much reviews about it, MongoDB and Neo4J are popular tools widely used, I have concerns if OrientDB is an adventure.

 

 So, my question would be of your opinion preferably based on your experience with these databases.

 

PS : Thanks in advance and apologies in advance as well for cryptic writing style.

 

 

 

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No wonder this question was a bit alien in gamedev which is very classical gaming oriented but it got attention from some of leading Graph Database developers. Still just wanted to say that I preferred OrientDB (just in case someone wondered and will wonder) because,

 

- Neo4J is great if you're after a rather small graph database but in an MMO it may quickly get out of hand and in that case licensing cost and master/slave scalability is ambigious.

 

- MongoDB is great if you can afford loss of casual data in exhange of speed, not so great in performance terms if checks involve.

 

- I believe that I will benefit from using one database for both graph and document data.

 

In that case native solutions were ArangoDB and OrientDB while can also use solutions like Structr over Neo4J or so.

 

- OrientDB's "links" seemed more logical then joins in performance terms.

 

So I preferred OrientDB for now , hope time will prove me right.

Edited by Unduli

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I never heard of MongoDB before and was curious what kind of DB could be successful which allowed a significant amount of  'data loss'  (seem client state interactions were much of the cause of that).

 

Finding info about it online, it seems the companies/organizations which use it mainly have a use-pattern of write-infrequently, read more often.     Does a pattern like that match your game where individual fields are stored in a blob 'book' schema structure rather than tables and for which broad document locks are used.

 

If you game has many constant small write updates of finer data granularity and constant read for client state updates, that kind of model may not be the best.

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I never heard of MongoDB before and was curious what kind of DB could be successful which allowed a significant amount of  'data loss'  (seem client state interactions were much of the cause of that).

 

Finding info about it online, it seems the companies/organizations which use it mainly have a use-pattern of write-infrequently, read more often.     Does a pattern like that match your game where individual fields are stored in a blob 'book' schema structure rather than tables and for which broad document locks are used.

 

If you game has many constant small write updates of finer data granularity and constant read for client state updates, that kind of model may not be the best.

 

My bad, I meant "loss of casual data" , by default MongoDB assumes data is written without any integrity check, though you can enable one of several integrity checks but performance hit occurs then. So it is great for example logging (where loss of few logs don't really matter) or so, as I can't afford losing tilemap and world data I preferred ACID compliance.

 

I have decided OrientDB but claims are to be tested, so my current plan is using it both for Dijkstra purposes (graph) and for world data (document database) , but there is still option to partially switch to a RDBMS for non-realtime data.

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IMO and IME, using a NoSQL database is like a shot in the dark.  Nobody really knows what's best for them.  All the benchmark and horror/success stories only add so little to your decision making.  Each one has its own benefit and advantages.  It really comes down to your own personal taste.

 

I have not used MongoDB professionally, but I did hear various stories about it.  Storage size exploded, concurrency issues, and now yours, loss of data.  I suspect that it is the incompetency of the developers and database administrators that caused the problems, not so much of the DB itself.  We are no longer living in the MySQL vs. PostgreSQL vs MSSQL vs Oracle SQL, in which there aren't that many to choose from, and the DB admins more likely have experience in any of those systems.

 

Searching for NoSQL database is like picking which cereal you are buying from the grocery stores.  So many, similar nuttritional content, only different shapes and flavors.

 

I am using Couchbase, because I don't like SQL statements.  Somehow these so-called NoSQL databases introduce their own SQL statement (e.g. Cassandra, Aerospike).  Couchbase is using map-reduce for querying.  Clustering is easy, and cross data center replication is also easy, something I don't want to administer over.

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