Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
_Kaven_

Unity C# .Net Open Source

This topic is 1329 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Quote :

 

"Today, Microsoft is making the core parts of its .Net framework open-source, and cross-platform on Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux. Microsoft is also committing to adding Android and iOS support in the upcoming Visual Studio 2015 — in fact, there’s already an Android emulator in Visual Studio 2015 Preview, and iOS support will be added soon. Furthermore, Microsoft is releasing a new version of Visual Studio — “Community 2013? — that is free and full-featured.This is a bold move that will attempt to cement .Net, C#, and Visual Studio as the dominant development platform across Windows, Linux, Android, iOS, and Mac "

 

 

Is this going to change the world of programming ? I mean will it hurt Java or ruby or the dev stuff xcode or linux a lot in the long run ?? For the first time C# and Visual Studio will be able to do everything on every Platform what it mean for the rest like netbeans eclipse and others older Tools etc lot's of experienced programmer believe Visual Studio is the greatest IDE and C# 1 of the best language out there so how can it help Microsoft and new programmers ??? Could it make C# more popular on the server side of things againts java ?

 

Thanks for your opinions and views on this very appreciated I am french thanks for the advices and sorry for the english

 

 

Some Source :

 

http://www.extremetech.com/computing/194099-microsoft-makes-net-open-source-finally-embraces-ios-android-and-linux

 

http://visualstudiomagazine.com/Home.aspx

 

 

Mederick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement

I don't like Mono but might try C# when it will be integrated fully in Ubuntu. When speed is comparable to C++ and doesn't pose install fuss for users, I might use it or simply stick to C++. I'm curious if Unity3D will move to MS C# as they didn't update to the latest Mono.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't like Mono but might try C# when it will be integrated fully in Ubuntu. When speed is comparable to C++ and doesn't pose install fuss for users, I might use it or simply stick to C++. I'm curious if Unity3D will move to MS C# as they didn't update to the latest Mono.

 

C# is generally speaking only slower on first boot, because the runtime is compiling the application down to native instructions based on the environment setup.

 

Poor cache awereness in the application code however might hurt the performance more, but then again if you dont do this in C++ you will have the a similar slowdown.
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm curious if Unity3D will move to MS C# as they didn't update to the latest Mono.

 

Doubtful they have there own branch of mono and it has not been synced with main branch for years; as a result it is not compatible with up to date versions of MS .net or Mono. If there was a easy fix to get away from the 'stop the world' garbage collector in there version they would have updated a long time ago ... (note: I have not looked at unity 5 so I might be outdated)

 

Not a big fan of Java or C# but lets hope this means we are one step closer to ditching security issues caused by Java or that it forces Oracle to step up and fix there broken platform/patching schedule.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love C#.

 

Just for the assemblies you can get hold of and plugin. Want a web browser in your application 10 minutes work, want a delauney triangulation system, another 10 minutes.

 

For tools and general applications it's awesome. You can really get things done quickly.

 

Also the ability to compile in code on the fly is very useful, you don't need a seperate scripting system. Write your scripts in C# and compile them in on the fly.

 

The garbage collector can be a pain in the ass, so watching what you use as temporary objects is important.

 

However all in all. It's a really good language to work in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Is this going to change the world of programming ? I mean will it hurt Java or ruby or the dev stuff xcode or linux a lot in the long run ??

I'm a new programmer, so take my words with a fistful of salt. I believe this will likely not hurt Java or C++, as Java is already used in many different jobs, and C++ is just much more powerful than C#. It'd be a hassle to convert an entire company from Java to C#, getting software, training, etc.

I do believe, however, smaller languages will likely become even smaller until they do something that makes them better than C#/Java

Or they will go extinct

Either way

Your move, Microsoft.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love C#.
 
Just for the assemblies you can get hold of and plugin. Want a web browser in your application 10 minutes work, want a delauney triangulation system, another 10 minutes.
 
For tools and general applications it's awesome. You can really get things done quickly.
 
Also the ability to compile in code on the fly is very useful, you don't need a seperate scripting system. Write your scripts in C# and compile them in on the fly.
 
The garbage collector can be a pain in the ass, so watching what you use as temporary objects is important.
 
However all in all. It's a really good language to work in.


Agreed, assemblies just work(TM) and Nuget makes it even better, installing a new dependency is - literally - one click away. C# is a very fun, enjoyable language to work with, even though it has its kinks and isn't necessarily suitable for every task, it does a great job at being flexible enough for most purposes while still remaining efficient enough both in terms of program performance and developer resources (and, importantly, it gives you most of the tools needed to improve performance in critical code, for instance manual struct layouts and reducing pressure on the GC by using short-lived value types on the stack; of course, you actually need to [be able to] use them to benefit from them). It's not the one true language, however it strikes a very good balance IMHO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I feel like I should point out that this is not limited to C#. MS is open-sourcing the .NET libraries which work with any .NET compatible language (C++/CLI, C#, VB, F#, variants on Python and other languages).

What this is basically going to do is give an "official" distribution of .NET on non-MS platforms that open-source people can freely include in their distributions (and I believe Mono is the actual port, so they're not going to be "killed" by this, just "legitimized" if that's the right word...)

Even better is that MS is open-sourcing the runtime which includes the JITer, GC, and other bits that were "black boxed" before, allowing the community to improve/port them.

As to C#, that was already freely usable since it was made (it's an ISO standard) and MS open-sourced their C# and VB compilers earlier this year - Roslyn.

Java is too entrenched to go anywhere, but this may make .NET far more popular then it has been in the open-source and mobile community. Edited by SmkViper

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't got the time yet to take a look at what's been open-sourced, but the advantage of Mono over .NET is, and has always been, that it can be embedded in your app. No messy installations, just copy-paste a lot of files into your game directory. A lot of people underestimate installers/uninstallers :)

 

I'm curious what will follow. Making VS free for "non-enterprise users" (in the Connect() videos they said small companies and indie devs are OK) is an awesome move. If they invest in clang for windows apps (mainly for the clang tools), it would be really awesome.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't got the time yet to take a look at what's been open-sourced, but the advantage of Mono over .NET is, and has always been, that it can be embedded in your app. No messy installations, just copy-paste a lot of files into your game directory. A lot of people underestimate installers/uninstallers smile.png
 
I'm curious what will follow. Making VS free for "non-enterprise users" (in the Connect() videos they said small companies and indie devs are OK) is an awesome move. If they invest in clang for windows apps (mainly for the clang tools), it would be really awesome.


VS is free for dev teams of five people or smaller, educational institutions, and open source projects. Visual Studio Community Edition - this is equivalent to the "Pro" version of VS.

They are already making Clang bindings for Android/iOS, but I don't see any reason for them to use Clang for Windows since they'd rather use their own compiler. Clang does not (yet) support the necessary extensions to compile with Windows and related headers and libraries, though there are teams working on it. I believe C++ Builder uses their own Clang port for 64-bit Windows but they don't have one for 32-bit yet.

And copying Mono into your app just wastes the user's storage space/download cap. I'd (personally) rather just install a shared library once and re-use it rather then having unique copies in each program I have installed. (Though I do see the value in a drag-and-drop "install" process, but that's more of a OSX thing) Edited by SmkViper

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

We are the game development community.

Whether you are an indie, hobbyist, AAA developer, or just trying to learn, GameDev.net is the place for you to learn, share, and connect with the games industry. Learn more About Us or sign up!

Sign me up!