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Audio API

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So, I know OpenAL's been a popular API for feeding audio data to the speakers in applications and even used for some OS features, but is it still around? I heard that Creative made it proprietary after its 1.1 release, and its website seems almost nonexistent. I know it's supported well on Mac, Linux and there's still a Windows installer on its website, but is that a good way to go? Should I be using OpenAL Soft? OpenAL Soft seems like what Freeglut is to GLUT haha.

 

I'd like to keep my programming initiatives multi platform (Linux, Windows and Mac), but should I be using DirectSound for Windows?

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Some of the FMOD stuff, FMOD Studio and FMOD Studio programmer’s API, is free for indie projects with less then $100,000 budget. Its also free for non commercial/educational, and the pricing isnt bad for commercial license.

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Ok, I'd be happy to look at Wwise. I have looked at FMOD before, but I know little about audio. I wanted to get into lower-level audio programming, and learn the theory so I could properly use higher-end tools like the two listed :) The other point for going low-level is so that I could at better understand how the data moves from the client application to the hardware. I was also hoping to find a widely-supported API though, so I wasn't constrained to any OS specific. It looks like OpenAL Soft is what I'm currently looking for!

 

I will return to something like FMOD or Wwise though, once I have the fundamentals in audio down.

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Note that with FMOD it's actually split into two API - a high level one based around its tools, and a low level one based around actually mixing audio data.
I'm not much of an audio programmer either, but AFAIK you can write plugins to actually generate or process audio samples/streams yourself.

Also AFAIK, a lot of audio stuff seems to be done in software these days instead of using dedicated mixing hardware, with largely pre-mixed data being sent to the OS-level APIs in the end.

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but AFAIK you can write plugins to actually generate or process audio samples/streams yourself.

Yeah Wwise definitely supports low level audio processing plugins (I just finished building a simple delay). It also gives you all sorts of interesting callbacks for messing around with speaker/channel volumes.

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I'd like to keep my programming initiatives multi platform (Linux, Windows and Mac), but should I be using DirectSound for Windows?


DirectSound was depreciated a few years ago, the gaming-focused API on Windows is now XAudio.

Of course, that's the low-ish level API, so you may find it easier to use libraries mentioned in this thread on top of it (especially if you're going cross-platform, as XAudio is Windows-only), but they'll probably all call into XAudio internally. Edited by SmkViper

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Interesting, I didn't even know that there are different OpenAL. I simply used the default on Linux/OSX and found some installer for Windows. Checking back in synaptic, it already uses by default openalsoft. So I'll check someday what I'm actually using on Win/Mac...rolleyes.gif

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