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OpenGL OpenGL 5 - Release?

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This seems to be an odd question as you will have most likely also no clue about this, however I was wondering when OpenGL 5 was announced a few months ago, everyone including the press was really excited and they talked about great new features it implements and what it is going to be and how many partners they already have, inlcuding Microsoft.

 

Sooooo... when is it going to be released?

In one, two, three, five years?

 

When I google OpenGL 5 I get mostly only OpenGL 4.5 as a result *scratching*

I think this is a pretty important question. If they really are going to overhaul the whole thing then developers and studios should know if they are safe to buy new hardware yet (or is it going to be obsolete next year again because it can't use OGL5) or if major projects are safe to start and not being obsolete on release.

 

Sooooo.... does ANYone know ANYthing about this?

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OpenGL 5 was announced a few months ago??

 

[edit] I assume you're thinking of this: https://www.khronos.org/news/press/khronos-group-announces-key-advances-in-opengl-ecosystem

 

"Next Generation OpenGL" will be a complete rewrite of OpenGL from scratch... so hopefully it will be called "OpenGL NG" and not "OpenGL 5".

 

Current top-of-the line GPUs will be DX12/Mantle compatible (though only AMD are writing Mantle drivers at the moment). So I would assume OpenGL NG will be based around the same set of hardware features as DX12/Mantle GPUs.

Edited by Hodgman

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Its not customary of Khronos to tell release dates... or anything, at all.

 

So expect it to be done when its done. And that's assuming it will be done, it might not.

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So expect it to be done when its done. And that's assuming it will be done, it might not.


Yeah, anyone familiar with OpenGL 2, and then OpenGL 3 especially, will realize that expecting Khronos to actually push a new API is a huge leap of faith.

If they really are going to overhaul the whole thing then developers and studios should know if they are safe to buy new hardware yet (or is it going to be obsolete next year again because it can't use OGL5) or if major projects are safe to start and not being obsolete on release.


If you're important, you'll know. You'll have pre-release hardware from the IHVs and you'll have NDA access to the SDKs for the new API. Everybody else is just fine developing against current APIs; it's not like they'll stop working. Due to that whole NDA thing, anyone with any meaty information on this topic is not allowed to share it with random inquisitive developers. (If you thought "OpenGL" was developed in the open or open to the community or open to direct reuse or even just more open than D3D, you've fallen into the clever trap of misleading marketing names.)

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So here goes a question - What is the big deal with OpenGL Next? From what I read so far nothing yet.

 

I am not a Graphics or Engine programmer - However I am an 3D Artist that deals with applications like Unreal 4, Cryengine, etc on a daily basis.

 

Sorry for the newbie questions. :\

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What is the big deal with OpenGL Next? From what I read so far nothing yet.


From your perspective, near nothing. It's mostly about speed. At most it'll let you have more complex models on the same hardware. There will be some new hardware features exposed by that time frame but those would've come to existing OpenGL anyway.

Just look at the marketing material for the Microsoft D3D12, AMD Mantle, or Apple Metal pre-release announcements. You'll get that, but with an OpenGL sticker on the box.

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From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenGL#OpenGL_NG

 

This is a codename given by journalists to a grounds-up redesign effort (semi-officially called "The Next Generation OpenGL Initiative"), to unify OpenGL and OpenGL ES into one common API that will not be backwards compatible with existing OpenGL versions.

 

"to unify OpenGL and OpenGL ES into one common API" can be important to some developers.

At the same time I guess it will make a lot of features optional which could complicate things, though hopefully there will be some sort of IsDesktop() or IsES() so we don't have to handle too many different cases.

Edited by Erik Rufelt

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If you thought "OpenGL" was developed in the open or open to the community or open to direct reuse or even just more open than D3D, you've fallen into the clever trap of misleading marketing names.

 

Minor OT: The problem is, that even some schools and universities teach about OpenGL being Open (which is huge mistake) - OpenGL is just a standard (which a lot of people doesn't really know), it is up to vendors whether they will implement it or not (and yes, that can happen if they decide to do some epic major changes with new upcoming versions), also these implementations are not open either. You can grab open implementation of OpenGL, they are at version 3.3 core profile (google for MesaGL).

 

The whole OpenGL NG is just a community thing, everyone would like unification of GL ES and GL api, removing legacy code (and removing compatiblity profiles - because I got the idea that nobody sane uses them anyway); better interface, etc. But I doubt it will really happen with just one version...

 

EDIT: My appologize, Erik Rufelt was faster. smile.png

Edited by Vilem Otte

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You can grab open implementation of OpenGL, they are at version 3.3 core profile (google for MesaGL).


You can grab an open sourced recreation of D3D9; from that same project in fact. That doesn't make D3D "open."

(btw, very minor nit, but it's just "Mesa" and not "MesaGL")

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To be honest, there's no reason to hold off on learning/teaching the later of the current APIs. The fundamentals are more or less the same, the operations you can do are largely uncharged. What the new APIs give you is more control over how you do these operations, e.g. Where the memory for the operations is coming from, when you want to make GPU resources resident or nonresident (which the driver would have had to guess before), etc etc. So you can treat the current APIs as a stepping stone towards the new APIs.

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