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Nameless Ones

Sending and receiving contracts

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Greetings all!

First off, this site is fantastic, so much good advice to be found. So, thank you.

I have a question about contracts, I've got one ready for use but so far never had the pleasure of using it. So the question is, how does the correspondence work? Do I send signed contracts across the globe via snail mail? Or scan my signature and use email?

Best Wishes

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Print it, sign it, scan it, email it, is what I do the vast majority of the time.

Once and a while someone will want contracts faxed for some reason.

Only once in 10 years have I had to deal with 'original documents only' that required physically mailing paper back and forth.

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Within the EU, simply cryptographically signing your email and stating that you agree can be classed as legally binding, if you are in the EU i recommend you research this, and also in any part of the world be wary of entering into any contract without speaking to a lawyer specialising in contract law if you are unsure about anything.

Edited by braindigitalis

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Hello, thanks again for previous answers. Here's two follow up questions:

 

1. Who usually provides the contract at first, me as a contractor or the employer? I have one ready but I'm unsure what the standard practice is.

 

2. How do you charge for interactive music? Per finished minute seems tricky to me as one minute could contain layers for several different in game scenarios, making that one minute function as several songs almost. And maybe the stems will be used in different songs, Is it as simple as just charging a bit more?

 

Thanks.

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1. Usually the party with the most money drafts the contract. But if you have one, and the other party doesn't, you can go with yours. Note, however, that if there is any kind of contract dispute, the ruling may go against the party who drafted the contract. Both parties need their attorney to check the contract.

2. The standard is not "per finished minute" but rather "per accepted minute." Charge whatever the client is willing to pay when you two negotiate.

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Hello, thanks again for previous answers. Here's two follow up questions:

 

1. Who usually provides the contract at first, me as a contractor or the employer? I have one ready but I'm unsure what the standard practice is.

 

2. How do you charge for interactive music? Per finished minute seems tricky to me as one minute could contain layers for several different in game scenarios, making that one minute function as several songs almost. And maybe the stems will be used in different songs, Is it as simple as just charging a bit more?

 

Thanks.

 

#1 The employer usually provides the contract as they are the one either hiring or 'contracting' you. Like Tom said get a lawyer to look it over just in case.

 

#2 You can negotiate and charge however you like. By track, by minute, by project, by hour worked, etc., that's really about what you're comfortable with and what they will accept.

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