Sign in to follow this  
Platzak

Ready yet?

Recommended Posts

Hello everyone,

Some months ago I started learning C++.
Unfortunately I haven't got many time to learn, so I'm stuck at the current chapter for a while.
I want to be a game developer in the future, so I have two questions:

1. Do I already know enough to start using Unreal Engine 4 to make games:
I learned and can use the following things: variables, functions, conditional statements, loops, arrays, vectors, pointers (only some basic things), classes and inheritance.

2. Would it be wise to start learning game development with an engine, or would it be better to learn the basics of game development first using an API like SFML.

 

3. If you advise to start with the engine, is it reachable to just make one or two small projects and then proceed with my book again, when I have more time?

Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What do you mean specifically by "game developer"? If you narrow this down it will be easier for you to answer these questions..

 

If you want to be a game programmer - I would suggest not using any engines like Unity or Unreal and instead create your own very simple arcade type games. This will take a long time but it will help you really understand the things that go on behind coding a game. Each basic game you make you will learn something new.

 

If your into game design, as in you like making up game play mechanics and game rules etc, then jump right in to Unreal. You can just learn code on a need to know basis - I would also suggest toying around with Unity and other engines as well - You can make your self some simple games using assets included with these editors.

 

If your in to game story writing then you could possibly write some stories - etc..

 

Try to narrow down what your really in to - find your niche and work on creating working projects/demonstrations within that realm. That's my suggestion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well then, you need to sharpen your programming skills.

 

You need to balance the way you learn.  Don't just go chapter by chapter from a book.  Create something that you want, then look at the book when you are stuck.

 

Programming is about creating things.   Creating things require you to have creative minds.  If you only follow directions from books, one page at a time, you aren't nourishing your creative mind.  Learning if-statements, loops, and classes are boring, and NO, they won't be enough to make you a game programmer.

 

Here's some tips how to take your skills to the next level:

 

Alter the problems from the book by a little bit.  If the book ask you to write a program that prints out the Fibonacci sequence of F(n) = F(n-1) + F(n-2), you alter the formula a little bit and write a program that prints out F(n) = F(n-1) + F(n-2) + F(n-3) + F(n-4).

 

If a book ask you to write a guessing game, in which the player is required to guess a number, you alter the problem such that instead of telling the player that his guess is "too high" or "too low", your program reverses the role that the computer needs to guess the player's number, and player is given options to instruct the computer to add/substract/multiply the numbers to reach to the right one.  Add a little code to detect if player is attempting to mislead the computer.

 

Do something, be creative.  Come up with your own problems, and solve them.  Programming is boring if you just read from chapter to chapter like that.  I too would fall asleep and lose interest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh excuse me.
My goal is to be a game programmer.

Thanks

 

A professional game programmer needs to know far more than the basics. Typically the content is learned in a 4-year degree, covering a wide range of algorithms and data structures and their application. They normally cover mathematics including calculus and linear algebra and statistics, all of which are useful for most game developers, although some will ignore their math and work in tiny increments rather than directly use Calculus or other advanced math. They will also learn about "algorithms over time", also called protocols in some contexts, for communicating and working with networked systems, working with parallel processing and threading, and much more. After four years of study plus your own hobby work, that is enough to become an entry level programmer. 

 

If you are looking to know enough to make your own stuff in Unreal, just to see what it is like, then you might have enough. You will likely need to do a lot of research and reading online before implementing anything, but that is acceptable for that type of developer.

 

You may as well try it at this point. If you discover you are in over your head you can always go learn more things.

Edited by frob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Being a programmer is more than just writing code ( there is a slight difference between a coder and programmer/software engineer for that matter )... I would recommend getting in on the ground floor ( I've seen one too many I don't know how to program, but I want to make games post..its all possible, but there are no shortcuts in life..you have to work for it )..Like frob stated above, you need the fundamentals before you can even think about becoming a game programmer ( that should be your motivating factor )..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes I understand what you guys say.

 

As long as I can move on with my book, there's no problem in motivation (but now there is), because

everytime I get some free time after a few  weeks, I open the book and everything I learned in the chapter is vague again

(because I had only time for half of it for example) and then I have to start over again. But some weeks later it is the same problem.

 

But I guess that I just need to wait a few moths untill holidays or something like that and then finish the chapter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In order to make ANY type of game i would recommend you AT LEAST learn the basics completely, it can be done without the basics, but i don't recommend it

 

In my own interpretation i thought it was about problem solving, not trying to say your wrong, its just my own take on it that i wanted to share...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this