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dragonCASTjosh

How to get a job in Graphic programming?

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dragonCASTjosh    128

So for a while now i have been looking to get a job in graphics programming but have had no sucsess so far. I would like to know if there is any advice you could give me on getting a job, and if there is anything i am doing wrong.

 

please feedback on any suggestions you have for me

 

Here is my CV/ Resume: https://dragoncastjosh.wordpress.com/online-cv/

and here is my Porfolio: https://dragoncastjosh.wordpress.com/graphics-programming/

 

If you see this and your looking to hire a programmer i am happy to work in any position, but i do not have the money to move, therfore somewhere around notthingham in the UK would be perfect. Although i might be able to organise moving around the UK if needed. 

 

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Edited: updated website to current feedback

Edited by dragonCASTjosh

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Jason El-Massih    1325

Looking them over, you have quite a few issues that you could address.

 

Try to get an actual domain name for yourself. It looks much more proffessional.

 

On your online CV  thing, Is it normal to put you secondary enducation on your CV? Although may be regional differences, I would remove it as most employers only care if you have a degree or not. Likewise, it says you are currently a student, so why are you looking for a job? Are you currently in school? Are you looking for an internship? You need to update that with your current status.

 

Your "Objective" statment is very verbose, I would make it clear and concise, without any fluff. 

 

All of the items in the "Skills" section are useless fluff. Once again regional differences may apply, but either remove it completely or keep it too 1-2 lines.

 

You mention "Confidence" in many languages, but have no projects using them. Dont make me take your word for it, just show me you know what you are doing.

 

Remove the share and comment sections...

 

However its hard to give feedback without actually seeing your real CV, and just seeing an arbitrary list of things on a website. If you dont have a CV, you need one.

 

Your Portfolio has several spelling errors, which are something easy to fix, and is extremely offputting to somebody looking at it. Likewise, you have 10 different sections for the same single project. It is a very dissorienting format, you shoould just show the one project and then bulletpoints to the different features/techniques used.

 

Remove all the DirectX sections, as there is nothing there, it just makes everything seem incomplete (Especially when there is spelling errors, "Porject" im looking at you!)

 

Remove the blog from your site. Its fine to have one if you write insightful posts, but having posts that are just "Looking for job" multiple times can be offputting and not professional.

 

as Kalle said, add videos and general visual sexyness to entice the viewer.

 

 

A more important thing is that Graphics Programming is very rarely an Entry-Level position. Most people go into it after working as a gameplay programmer or similar (Or a crapton of school), so if you are only applying to Graphics Programming positions, its very unlikely you will find a job.

Edited by theflamingskunk

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dragonCASTjosh    128

Looking them over, you have quite a few issues that you could address.

 

Try to get an actual domain name for yourself. It looks much more proffessional.

 

On your online CV  thing, Is it normal to put you secondary enducation on your CV? Although may be regional differences, I would remove it as most employers only care if you have a degree or not. Likewise, it says you are currently a student, so why are you looking for a job? Are you currently in school? Are you looking for an internship? You need to update that with your current status.

 

Your "Objective" statment is very verbose, I would make it clear and concise, without any fluff. 

 

All of the items in the "Skills" section are useless fluff. Once again regional differences may apply, but either remove it completely or keep it too 1-2 lines.

 

You mention "Confidence" in many languages, but have no projects using them. Dont make me take your word for it, just show me you know what you are doing.

 

Remove the share and comment sections...

 

However its hard to give feedback without actually seeing your real CV, and just seeing an arbitrary list of things on a website. If you dont have a CV, you need one.

 

Your Portfolio has several spelling errors, which are something easy to fix, and is extremely offputting to somebody looking at it. Likewise, you have 10 different sections for the same single project. It is a very dissorienting format, you shoould just show the one project and then bulletpoints to the different features/techniques used.

 

Remove all the DirectX sections, as there is nothing there, it just makes everything seem incomplete (Especially when there is spelling errors, "Porject" im looking at you!)

 

Remove the blog from your site. Its fine to have one if you write insightful posts, but having posts that are just "Looking for job" multiple times can be offputting and not professional.

 

as Kalle said, add videos and general visual sexyness to entice the viewer.

 

 

A more important thing is that Graphics Programming is very rarely an Entry-Level position. Most people go into it after working as a gameplay programmer or similar (Or a crapton of school), so if you are only applying to Graphics Programming positions, its very unlikely you will find a job.

 

Thanks for the feedback and ill work through the poinst 1 at a time.

 

and to clear up on the looking for a job whilst in education, my tutors have stated that my programming abilities are way above avarage for college level but i stuggle to get my head around other sections of the corse like art and animation. These sections are draging my grade down to the point where univercitys that offer graphic specific corses are above the grades i have. My tutor suggested that college and education along them lines does not benifit me as all my skills are self tought, and that it would be a good idea to look into getting a job instead of education.

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swiftcoder    18437

It's very important that one's resume presents relevant information, and only relevant information. With that in mind, you need to refocus your CV pretty drastically:

 

- The fact that in highschool you received a C in chemistry? Not relevant to a career in graphics programming. Drop the Brunts Academy down to a single line item.

 

- What you are doing in college is much more important, by comparison, yet you have only a single line item for that. Expand this with a brief description of (relevant) coursework.

 

- Declaring your skills as quick learning, level headed, team player etc. is fairly pointless. Literally *everyone* claims those same traits on their resume. I'd drop this section entirely.

 

- It isn't effective to claim "Strong knowledge of programming with OpenGL", without justifying it in some way. Experience should be a list of relevant projects (work or coursework), with a brief description of what the project constituted and what skills were obtained in the process.

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_the_phantom_    11250

A more important thing is that Graphics Programming is very rarely an Entry-Level position. Most people go into it after working as a gameplay programmer or similar (Or a crapton of school), so if you are only applying to Graphics Programming positions, its very unlikely you will find a job.


This is key in my opinion.
While it isn't impossible to be hired directly to the role you'll need a very strong portfolio behind you showing that you can cut the mustard. I've not looked at the links by judging by the comments made so far it would seem you don't have a degree which is also going to hold you back from getting a job (I know from experience; applied to a company before I had my result and got nothing. Got result and suddenly the same company were 'desperate to talk' to me. The paper matters).

But, ultimately, unless you can show you are very good you are unlikely to get hired into graphics programming role directly and the UK has no shortage of more experienced graphics programmers kicking about right now which probably doesn't help you smile.png

While it might not be your passion I would see about getting into the industry first, get a year or two under your belt before trying to grab a graphics role and during that time work on your skills outside of work hours to make that more likely.

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dragonCASTjosh    128

It's very important that one's resume presents relevant information, and only relevant information. With that in mind, you need to refocus your CV pretty drastically:

 

- The fact that in highschool you received a C in chemistry? Not relevant to a career in graphics programming. Drop the Brunts Academy down to a single line item.

 

- What you are doing in college is much more important, by comparison, yet you have only a single line item for that. Expand this with a brief description of (relevant) coursework.

 

- Declaring your skills as quick learning, level headed, team player etc. is fairly pointless. Literally *everyone* claims those same traits on their resume. I'd drop this section entirely.

 

- It isn't effective to claim "Strong knowledge of programming with OpenGL", without justifying it in some way. Experience should be a list of relevant projects (work or coursework), with a brief description of what the project constituted and what skills were obtained in the process.

 

Thanks for the advice and i will get straight to that.

 

 

This is key in my opinion.
While it isn't impossible to be hired directly to the role you'll need a very strong portfolio behind you showing that you can cut the mustard. I've not looked at the links by judging by the comments made so far it would seem you don't have a degree which is also going to hold you back from getting a job (I know from experience; applied to a company before I had my result and got nothing. Got result and suddenly the same company were 'desperate to talk' to me. The paper matters).

But, ultimately, unless you can show you are very good you are unlikely to get hired into graphics programming role directly and the UK has no shortage of more experienced graphics programmers kicking about right now which probably doesn't help you smile.png

While it might not be your passion I would see about getting into the industry first, get a year or two under your belt before trying to grab a graphics role and during that time work on your skills outside of work hours to make that more likely.

 

 

I understand you point and im happy to settle for any position in the games industry, although graphics is my ideal.  Do you think its work me making 2 porfolio 1 based around game programming projects and the other based around graphics programming projects.

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Jan2go    2057

Do you think its work me making 2 porfolio 1 based around game programming projects and the other based around graphics programming projects.


Having two separate portfolios (as in: two different pages) will only confuse people. You can however have multiple projects on your portfolio which focus on different aspects.


One more thing. A quick Google search about you turned up some things that I personally wouldn't want my potential employers to find, like the videos of your 16th birthday on YouTube.

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dragonCASTjosh    128

 

Do you think its work me making 2 porfolio 1 based around game programming projects and the other based around graphics programming projects.


Having two separate portfolios (as in: two different pages) will only confuse people. You can however have multiple projects on your portfolio which focus on different aspects.


One more thing. A quick Google search about you turned up some things that I personally wouldn't want my potential employers to find, like the videos of your 16th birthday on YouTube.

 

 

good point ill remove that vid and the other like it

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Ravyne    14300

You probably need to re-aim your portfolio -- accepting that jumping straight into a graphics programmer role is unlikely, landing a more attainable entry job like game-play programmer isn't going to happen with a portfolio that only shows your graphics chops. Its always good to show well-roundedness, but every employer want's to know that you've deeper capability in the particular area they can fit you with. Valve describes their ideal employee as being "T-shaped" by which they mean that an employee who knows a good bit about every subject and knows everything about one particular subject is what they're looking for; and while Valve is known best for saying it, it's my observation that this is really almost everyone's ideal employee. 

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dragonCASTjosh    128

You probably need to re-aim your portfolio -- accepting that jumping straight into a graphics programmer role is unlikely, landing a more attainable entry job like game-play programmer isn't going to happen with a portfolio that only shows your graphics chops. Its always good to show well-roundedness, but every employer want's to know that you've deeper capability in the particular area they can fit you with. Valve describes their ideal employee as being "T-shaped" by which they mean that an employee who knows a good bit about every subject and knows everything about one particular subject is what they're looking for; and while Valve is known best for saying it, it's my observation that this is really almost everyone's ideal employee. 

 

Thank you for the advance and im going to get to work at expanding my work into other projects and target other job within the industry.

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Natom    110

I'd also like to throw in my two cents. It is my experience that you rarely stick to the job you're hired for, game development is notorious for "the publishers want this by next week" or "John needs help". My first job I got hired on as a UI programmer. I wound up spending about half my time on gameplay elements / helping people debug physics. I even got leased to our other team for a while.

The point is, if your passion is to be a graphics programmer don't be afraid to pursue that and let it be known. Even if it's not the job you're applying for, it's good to know that you have a goal. Maybe the biggest things I look for in an interview are drive and ambition, because no matter how smart you are there are going to be lots of times when you hit a brick wall and you really have to want to get past it.

That being said, you need to re-orient your priorities.
* Put down contact information. It needs to be ridiculously easy for someone to get in touch with you.
* Be progressive. If your resume isn't going to be in a traditional format, spruce it up. Use some HTML5. Animate something. http://phaser.io/ Good news, here's your chance to prove you can be a graphics programmer! Spending time on this is important, you have to sell yourself here.
* Point blank: I don't care if you made a 2.0 or a 5.0 GPA. Probably nobody really cares. They barely care if you have a degree, and in some cases that doesn't matter either. I know that's hard to hear considering how hard you just worked for that, but it's true. They're going to determine if you're competent based on the technical interview. Paper is just there to get you on the phone, and once you have titles under your belt the paper generally stops mattering. If you can't get experience, MAKE EXPERIENCE (read a couple points down)
* Drop making your own engine. Probably every new game programmer makes this mistake, including myself when I graduated. It's a fruitless endeavor. There is an absolutely massive amount of ever-expanding technology to wrap your head around and you'll probably never get around to it if you're stuck reinventing the wheel. Take a top down approach here, tackle Unity (another engine is probably fine too, I just like Unity).

* Write some fancy shaders and show them off on your portfolio. If you use Unity, put it in a web player. Better yet, grab some assets and start making small games. Make and follow deadlines. Push yourself. Use a new feature every game. You can do incredible things in even the simplest games. This teaches you so many things school simply can't, not least of which is knowing your own limits and learning how to complete a project (BIG DEAL!).
* People who make YouTube tutorials are the BEST. Almost every week I come across a really cool new tutorial on something and - wait for it - WANT TO HIRE THAT PERSON. #WishIKnewThisWhenStarvingAfterCollege

I hope I haven't been too redundant, it's been a long day and I'm nodding off. At a glance I can say everyone has given you good advice. Good luck!

Edited by Natom

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