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Which tool is better for start? Engine or framework?

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Hello, I was learning Unity3d, but I saw there are another free alternatives, or cheaper engines. I like c# and I look at Monogame, I dont know if going to a framework will be a step behind because its easy in Unity, or you cant do some things. But I dont want to pay 1000 $ that I dont have.

 

Which tool you recommend to start? engine , framework? another thing, Any tool for develop in linux? Thanks.

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Unreal is $20 (with full source code)... you do have to pay 5% royalties after the first $3,000 that your game makes - but that's a pretty sweet deal.

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You can get a long way with the free version of Unity - don't assume you need to spend a lot of money on the full version to be able to make games. Your knowledge of the system and your ability to innovate and produce great content will be far bigger factors in the quality of your games than the fact you didn't pay for the full licence. You can always upgrade later, just spend the profits from your first successful release.

 

Edit: also agreed, Unreal is a good deal financially. Personally I found it harder to get started with than Unity, but it's worth considering.

Edited by BarrySkellern

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The best tool is the one you actually use.

 

Any of the above recommendations will work just fine for starting. The most important thing is that you pick something that works for what you want to do and start making things with it. That could be Unity, or Processing, or Unreal, or GameMaker, or Construct or one of the many other free or inexpensive game engines.

 

If you have the programming experience, it could also be building something with Ogre or Monogame or something. They all work fine. But usually, if you have to ask the question you probably don't have enough experience to go for that and will probably get further with an engine.

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I dont know if going to a framework will be a step behind because its easy in Unity

 

More code doesn't mean a step behind; it means a step behind for your productivity/time. Through code you will learn 100^10 more, but you will need some time to implement it.

 

If you want to be productive go with an good game engine and you will need at some point some code that is much higher level than a framework (but it is less than with a framework).

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thanks.

 

Yes, I know Unity is free, but dont have important features for optimization, using video.. etc. Then you have a watermark in all the products you do... for this, I ask for a full and complete tool for develop games, for focus my efforts in one tool.

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To be perfectly honest, and I don't mean this in a negative way, if you have to ask that question, you prolly don't really need Unity Pro yet anyway, so that's one less choice you'd have to worry about.

 

I saw in your other post that you're having issues just moving a rectangle around, once again I'm not being negative we all go through that, I'm just saying you should get the basic features of whichever engine/framework you choose first before worrying about optimizations.

I apologize if I can't give you a more direct answer cause I agree with some of the others who posted on here, it really doesn't matter which route you take, both will have it's pros and cons. Going the Engine route, you'll be able to create things faster and have the instant gratification. While going the framework wise you'll have to do a lot more coding to do the simpler things, but to some of us, that's more satisfying, as you tend to get a better understanding of what's going on behind the scenes.

Edited by Delite413

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yes, that was a year ago... 

 

Ok, I try to learn with a framework (love2d), all the knowledge is usefull.

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thanks.

 

Yes, I know Unity is free, but dont have important features for optimization, using video.. etc. Then you have a watermark in all the products you do... for this, I ask for a full and complete tool for develop games, for focus my efforts in one tool.

 

Do you need these features? Do you have a running prototype and the only thing stopping you from releasing it is missing optimization?

 

Are you sure you did your bit? The most effective optimization comes from optimizing your assets, which is something Unity Pro, or any other engine or tool, will not do for you: reducing polycount, optimizings texture size, baking textures to an atlas and mesh parts to a single mesh.....

The static batching is a nice feature, but you can achieve the same offline with any 3D Package.... export your scene from Unity, import to Blender, combine all the meshes, re-import to unity.... of course, you just lost the ability to have the engine manage your detail meshes (like culling them outside of viewrange), but for smaller scenes its a viable way to optimise.

 

Do you really NEED render to texture? Its a nice feature, don't get me wrong, but only if you really use it in your game. And you could easely develop your own version, if you are proficient with shader programming and C# (no idea how well optimized that would be though).

 

Do you really care about the watermarks? Is it bad to have people know you are using Unity to create your game? Lots of big studios also have Kind-of watermarks on their products, guess the licenses are a little bit cheaper this way, or the developer is actually proud to let people know they use awesome-engine-2.0 but at any rate, doesn't stop people from buying the games.

 

 

If you run into these limitations currently, then yeah, try any other engine. Unreal 4 will msot probably give you the best bang-for-your-bucks, at 20$ it is hard to beat with all you get. But if you want to go totally "freeloading", good luck. There are many free engines around, don't know if any of these can compare to Unity or UE4 when it comes to a fully integrated toolset.

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