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AhmedCoeia

Employee appraisal

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Hi All,

I have been working 3D game programming for a year now, and that is my first job in industry. Today I had employee appraisal and my manager told me that I don't work independently and I ask for help and two guys (seniors) they are tutoring me for the last year and I'm wasting their time. However I have worked on a lot of tasks dependently too, but for tasks that are beyond my knowledge, yes I ask them. 

I asked him what if the situation won't be improved, he said I won't be in the team..however he asked me to be patient with another team member that is causing a lot of troubles to other team members and he is still in the company for a long of years! 

 

I have already another offer from a company that is doing augmented reality, do you think should I wait to be fired or listen to my boss and do better or leave and keep my dignity untouched, in case getting fired? 

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What can I do then? He said sorry for that ( when he said you won't be in the team), that he needs quality of the product to be high,..etc of none sense reasons. 

 

I wanna dig into the industry, but looks like there are no junior or entry level jobs at all. For example I was asking my colleagues yes about some areas which I'm not expert in! or have no clue to solve them. For example an imposter, a friend told me an algorithm then I implemented it and made it work. what's wrong with that ?!!! what's wrong if my colleague give me advises in how to approach a problem 

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I think my question to you be, what have you done outside the work on your own to expend your knowledge and learn new things and hone your skills on your own. I hired quite few junior guys in the last couple years and if I did not see measurable improvements in their knowledge an experience after one year, I would consider parting the ways.

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it was am mixture feeling of please don't do this (work independently ) and when I stressed If not, he said in 3 months to 6 months, we will evaluate, then I said, if not, he said you won't be in the team. 

he also said you need to learn much in client programming, so what ? is it bad that I ask colleagues  and learn ? what's wrong with him ?  he said I'm wasting their time, but to be honest it just occurred one time that a guy asked for per programming for the whole year. and I did a lot of tasks independently, he even didn't know about them, because he is a server side programmer, and the client manager who hired me left the company after three months of my employment

 

Why it's bad if I'm learning but I'm doing the task ? I have never left a task not done since the whole year! no one single task 

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You have been with the company for a year.  That's usually more than enough for anyone to see how you work, and what you have been told is your boss' perception of your work.  He's in charge, and he's clearly not super happy with your work.  He wants you to improve, and he gives you time.  It's a good thing that he told you this upfront.  Some people will let it sit for a long time until you suddenly get the pink slip without warning whatsoever.

 

Here's the thing of being an engineer.  You need to figure things out yourself.  That's what makes a good engineer, when they solve problems.  Engineering problems are not math problems.  There is not one answer, but many.  The way I see it, engineering problems are the opposite of math problems.  A typical math problem asks you "what's the result of 1+1", an engineering problems is "I have 10 and 3.  What should I do to get 2?"

 

You need to figure out what you need to do, instead of asking people what you need to do.  If you are stuck, research things yourself, figure things out yourself.  This is part of the reason why tech forums don't want to solve people's homeworks.  Don't let the senior engineers solve problems for you.

Edited by alnite

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Based purely off of what I've been reading, I probably wouldn't want to have you work for me either. If after a year you aren't 95% self-sufficient and independent, and working to refine your processes and output quality product, and instead you're asking the rest of the team for help, you're really not a good employee. If I'm paying each employee $60 per hour (just to keep the math simple) and after a year, you still routinely take 15 minutes to get help from someone else, I'm paying for your time and their time, so I'm losing $30 for those 15 minutes. At first, I could justify this as a cost which could be seen as a long term investment in the development of an employee and their skill set. I would expect to see lots of positive growth with a tendency towards self sufficiency and a progression of the technical difficulty of the questions being asked, and a greater independence. If that doesn't happen, and instead I see an employee using fellow coworkers as a crutch in order to avoid the necessary pain it takes to grow, I won't be happy.

 

I would have no problems IF you said, "Hey, I can't figure out how to do X. I've done all this research and progressed to this point, but Y is really hard to wrap my head around. Have you ever dealt with this before? Do you have an suggestions on where I should aim my efforts?" There are a few important things to realize in this approach. First, you have identified the problem. Second, you have given a really honest attempt at solving the problem yourself, and you have made some progress. Third, you can admit that a portion of it is confusing to you. Fourth, you're not asking someone to tell you what to do, you're asking for guidance.

 

In my humble opinion, your boss has been really generous to let you stay on the team for a year. Wow. Seriously. That's a lot of money you've costed him in wages. He must really be all about that employee development and giving you a good solid chance to prove yourself. It's a bit shitty that he's only bringing up this issue now rather than nine months ago. You can bet that there have been conversations about you and your performance behind your back with your team mates, and they haven't been favorable. If you want to stay on the job, you need to start pushing yourself towards becoming self-sufficient as a problem solver. When you accomplish great things and contribute to the teams success, don't keep it a secret. Tell people what you did. Talk to people. See how you can help them be better. 

 

If in fact you ARE a great employee and I'm completely misreading the situation here, and you're doing great work, then you have a big communication and perception problem with your boss and coworkers. This is an area we can all improve in, and it may also cost you your job if you don't make some rapid changes. Again, talk to people. Figure out what's expected of you. Communicate your progress, ask for assessments, try to get better, help your team mates, don't weigh them down with questions which can be googled in 5 minutes. Figure out what the big picture is, what the project vision is, where you fit in, and how you can push it forward and bring success to the team.

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