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moeen k

how compeletely free games,apps,services,sites, libraries make money?

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hi.

maybe you say its a simple stupid question but i really want to know and i really dont know about it.

 

a website like facebook, tweeter and so many free file sharing websites, they dont receive money from anyone. they have huge webhosting that it should take lots of money. they have so many engineers and programmers that are certainly well paid.

 

some game engines like ogre are compeletly free and open source. or some dll libraries.many unity plugins and codes. you can simply find out that very big amount of time been taken to make that and a good team was behind of that and certainly they were no side project.

 

can you say how they really make money or if they dont make money from those projects what was the goal of that project.

 

thank you for helping.

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Facebook and Twitter etc receive millions from two things

Firstly advertising, targetted ads based on people's profiles. "we saw you liked coca cola, have you tried Pepsi?"

Secondly they sell personal data by the bucket load go third parties. All your demographics and analysis of it has massive value to advertisers.

It all hinges on both sides having millions if not billions of members and lots of data.

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As mentioned above, for online services such as Facebook, Twitter, etc. the users (and all the personal information they collect about us) are their main product.  They have this absolutely fantastic collection of all sorts of data about people's interests, habits, relationships, etc. and that information is valuable to businesses.

 

A lot of those services also feature advertising as a source of income.

 

 

Open sourced projects such as OGRE don't necessarily make money, or at least don't aim to do so.  Possible sources of income (often used to pay for web-hosting, etc. rather than to generate a profit) commonly include advertising and donations.  Many of these projects are ran and contributed to by volunteers, and they're simply trying to provide a good piece of software, library of code, or whatever free of charge, often with a certain ideology.  

 

In some cases software or libraries may be free but income is gained from selling support to businesses or individuals who use it.

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In some cases software or libraries may be free but income is gained from selling support to businesses or individuals who use it.

LuaJIT was the first thing that came to mind when you mentioned this.  Freely available, but the author Mike Pall solicits companies to sponsor specific feature requests that they feel they could make significant use of.  Once the feature is complete, it is generally fully integrated into the open source project, available for the benefit of all users, but Mike nonetheless is able to earn a living and keep doing the work he wants to do.  Sounds like an awesome model to me, when sustainable.

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For products I've worked on you can either pay indirectly by being exposed to ads and getting some of your information detected and sold indirectly through the ad network, or you can pay a small cost to get completely removed from the ads, meaning they also stop siphoning your data away through that product.  Either you pay, or you become the product.

 

 

Or, if you are Outfit7, and are selling shovelware like [url=https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.outfit7.talkingbenpro&hl=en]talking ben the dog[/url] you can continue harvesting metrics and pushing IAPs and ads to children even after their parents have bought the full paid version of the app.

 

Bitter? Me? smile.png

Edited by braindigitalis

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Facebook make their money from Advertising.

Twitter gets its startup money from Venture Capitalists and Investors and tries to earn a living from Ad Revenue.  However they only posted their first profit last year (2014) and it was not a big profit considering the amount of investment but, then it took Amazon 14 years to raise their first dollar in profit.

Open source projects don't actually make any profit but they do raise funds that get invested back into the product some of these funds are from donations.  Blender also raises money from selling tutorial books and DVDs and subscriptions to Blender Cloud.  GIMP and Inkscape have both recently done kick-starters to raise money for new features to be developed.

Some projects are completely free and the developers do it just because they love coding cool stuff. 

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Some projects are completely free and the developers do it just because they love coding cool stuff.

Another reason for making a game completely free (of payments, advertisement, sold user data, and so on) is ones portfolio/reputation. Having a good piece of work on his/her portfolio could give a good impression to potential employers, clients (e. g. contract work), or investors. The Android App Timely is for all I know a good example, since the company was bought after releasing this app (without any previous releases). Another one is Öffi, which is developed by a freelancing developer.
A developer could also aim to get some media coverage by making a game related to a hot topic. An example would be "Abbruch Bayer" (which translates to something like "Bavaria demolition", in contrast to "Aufbruch Bayern"/"upswing Bavaria", the original game made by a political party about some numbers and values of Bavaria). Sadly, the linked article is only available in german, since the covered topic only has a local significance.

These are reasons a person, team or company could consider, but there are much less games (and applications) release with this intent, instead of "free" ones with some kind of monetization.

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