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Hello everyone,

 

This is the 3rd site I'm trying to get my answers from. In the first one, I am still waiting to get through the moderator queue for my account to get activated which was a month ago, I have asked for help in daniweb but there is nothing in almost 3 weeks, so you're my only hope!dry.png

 

I came out a programming school, but I'm one of these who are "last gen" programmers which got stuck with old stuff such as turbo pascal or even older hardware code, we only had C# in our last months of a 4-years education.

 

I have an idea about a RTS strategy, the idea took me years to develop with offering a lot of flexibility, but every damn developer I've contacted has completely ignore me, some mainstream developers have their heads so far up their a***es that it comes out the right end again, but I digrees.

 

My momma always said: You want something done right, do it yourself!happy.png

 

So I want to make the game (that has literally haunted me) myself. It will be a strategy game, 3D in nature but no verticality, naval battles with sporadic landmasses serving only as obstacles. But the problem is that I don't know where to begin.

 

I know that some of you will outright recommend existing game engines for me to go for, but unfortunately they do not grant the programming freedoms for the features that I require. I even asked some of them if that which I need is doable in their engine and they rejected me. So I'm afraid C# is my only option.

 

But I don't know where to begin. I don't know how to structure it, I don't know what libraries to include, I don't know much in general. In school, we only came as far as 2D grids and a few jokes for a program for which I've done better even dabbling at home.

 

So if you guys could help somebody who knows algorightms, some code (but not a lot) to get started, I would appreiciate that. I am not picky, and can go for anything DirectX, OpenGL or even mantle.

 

And yes I tried google, but it is insistant to keep pushing cryengine and other engine tutorials in my face.

 

Thank you in advance for all your help!

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I know that some of you will outright recommend existing game engines for me to go for, but unfortunately they do not grant the programming freedoms for the features that I require. I even asked some of them if that which I need is doable in their engine and they rejected me. So I'm afraid C# is my only option.

What a wonderful conclusion!

If the great Google told you to use C#, then let that be it.

It is shrouded in mystery how you arrived at the (non-nonsensical) conclusion, but how dull life would be without enigmas.

 

I think that you could have picked just about any engine using any language and it would still be a perfect fit for what you are trying to accomplish.

However, stick with your decision, no matter how you arrived at it. :)

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So, some engines (like Unity) let you write the Gameplay code in C# - these will probably suit you well.

Otherwise, you can use a popular C# "frameworks" (a bit simpler than an engine like Unity, but still having solved a lot of the boring non-gameplay issues), such as XNA, MonoGame, etc.

Lastly if you really want to start from scratch, you can use something like SharpDX to implement your own graphics framework.

Personally, I recommend going through this list of options from the top down over the course of many projects. At the top you only care about gameplay, and as you go down that list of options you have to care more and more about low level systems architecture that has nothing to do with gameplay.

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So if I understand this correctly, these engines have more mundane resources already in place, such as graphics, textures and models, but leave the core impletementation of what they are used for up to the programmer?

 

Well that's nice... are any of them for free?

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Engines such as Unity or Unreal offer a lot of basic functionality that you would otherwise have to implement for yourself -- loading graphics, editors for building your levels, audio, collision detection, etc.  You load in your assets (graphics, audio, etc.) and write additional code to add the specific functionality of your game -- AI, how units behave, all of your games mechanics, etc. 

 

A lower level framework such as XNA or MonoGame doesn't provide editors and only offers more basic functionality.  You get a bit more potential flexibility but have to do more work for yourself.  They still save a lot of time and effort compared to starting from scratch and doing it all yourself.


Unreal Engine has no upfront fees, and you pay 5% royalties (after the first $3,000 per product per quarter) when your game is released.  You can program in C++ or using a visual system called Blueprints.

 

Unity has a free edition with no royalties but some features (which you probably don't need) restricted and a mandatory splash screen in the free version.  You can program in C# or UnityScript.

 

MonoGame is completely free but is a lower-level framework rather than an engine.  You can program in C# or any other .NET language.

 

 

Just to reinforce what some of the others have said, none of what you described would be particularly problematic to implement in any popular engine, although as a beginner basically starting from scratch you will likely need to spend some time learning before you have the necessary skills to create a game like you're describing.

 

 

Hope that helps! smile.png

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Unity has physics simulations. I haven't used Unreal but I can't imagine it doesn't have a physics simulator as well. I'm so sure of it that I'm not even going to check if I'm right. However, the game designer will need to determine how to use the physics simulator.

 

In Unity, for AI, you'll likely need to do a lot of it yourself since the topic is basically "how I want my game to behave" and that's very context dependent.  That said, Unity has support for things that will help common tasks, like Navigation and Pathfinding so enemy and non-player characters can figure out how to move around the environment you create.

 

If you have an animation on hand (you can buy them, commission someone to make them for you, find free ones, or learn to do it yourself), your code would need to determine when and how to use it. This would be based on, for example, encountering triggers, or some scenario is detected based on say the character's health, etc. Again, that's something that can be very context dependent. Of course unity documentation explains the how in more detail, although you might not be ready for it until you've explored the basics of unity in more detail.

 

At this point you get an engine and start learning how to use it and see for yourself what it takes. There's never been a better time for jumping in the deep end. If you find it overwhelming you can go to the shallower end of the pool. If you have specific questions on why something isn't working or aren't sure how to go about doing something (and google didn't help), you can ask in the appropriate forum here or ask around in the unity forums. Good luck.

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Eh the animation will be very simple, We're just talking about ships here, with guns, moving in a ship-like fashion, guns rotate, Turrets have recoil, and that's about regarding animations really... except maybe water, but that's an entirely different thing. Even the graphics will be simplified, cartoony...

 

Most of the work I'll be doing on the interface for controlling units. I intend to totally do away with traditional unit control and throw a lot into the AI. There will be XP ranks that determine how smartly the AI will act... but I will not get any further into that.

 

If you ever played some of the early settlers games, then you know what I'm talking about. Imagine that building and resource mechanic but also unit control translated into a similar fashion.

Edited by BigBadBeef

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And i have no grandiose delusions, I'm just trying to get my proof of concept through, if it works, I will have justification to support for the project's successor, a full 3D strategy game with all the bells and whistles integrated as a full MMO.

 

I hate to tell you this, but if your step 1 is build a "simple" RTS, and Step 2 is Build a full 3D strategy game. Then you are very much under a grandiose delusion. smile.png Especially If your entire C# skillset is the last few months of school.

 

Here's what you do. Take your current cool game idea and put it off to the side. It's far too big and far too complicated to start with. Instead start working on very simple and well understood gaming concepts. Take a look at this article. It tells you which games you should start out with and why.

 

http://www.gamedev.net/page/resources/_/technical/game-programming/your-first-step-to-game-development-starts-here-r2976

 

- Eck

 

 

You know, what you've done here is just plain rude. You have snapped right at me without even bothering to read the continuation of this topic or anything else that would have been said here - I will not dignify it with a direct response, for crying out loud, its right in the next paragraph from the quote you pulled on me!
mellow.png

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It is not rude. It is the truth. Why sugarcoat it?

He actually took some of his own time to write that answer, and all you can do is get butt-hurt.

You may not like what he is saying, but you will probably get nowhere if you don't follow his advice and chop up your goals into more manageable bits. Into goals that you can actually accomplish.

If you disagree, then "dignify yourself" carefully considering what he has to say instead of pulling this childish act of a drama-queen.

Edited by jacmoe

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Look, my entire commenting section is dependant on the fact that we're talking on the same page here. I may not have the most recent programming knowledge, but would it not be logical to assume that since I came from programming school, that I've done this stuff before? I assumed you know all this.

 

We've literally done space invaders in turbo pascal before in school, it really is a matter of just learning code, syntax, not algorithms themselves. How best to approach this matter is another thing.

 

I also feel that since I'll be practising, I might as well do it on piece of what I'm planning itself. I feel like getting some triangles to manuever like boats and shoot dots at each other is a good place to continue my forehand knowledge. That graphics thing can come later.

 

To be honest, I would have gone to specialized language courses, but unfortunately I wasn't able to toss together the money for professional education. I might not get it on a piece of paper, but I am determined to know nonetheless and get it done. My country is so backwards that even I am seen as some woodoo mumbo jumbo computer wizard and because of that educators feel they have a right to rip us off with professional courses, but I digress...

 

I have taken seriously everything that has been said here and will consider my options carefully before proceeding... I mean it!cool.png

 

In the meantime I'm brushing up on the C# code.

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I have decided the following:

Since this will not only be my first project, but also proof of concept, I will make a top-down 2D strategy game, because simply, for a proof of concept, there is really no need to make a fuss about it. And it will also save me some coding as I will only have a 2D grid to work with and not a 3D one.

 

Because this is my first project, I will chop up the features of the planned game into standalone components and will implement those into a planned game later, but only after I've mastered every individual component.

 

Considering all these factors now, do you still recommend I go for the unity engine on this one? Mind you that the emphasis on this game will a completely different approach towards unit control! Doing the AI will be completely manual! As will be the controls for the AI!

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I would probably pick a leaner engine like MonoGame for a project like that, but I guess you can use Unity.

I think MonoGame will provide a more back to basics approach, but it's your call smile.png

<edit>

There's probably more code for AI, movement and basics out there for XNA/MonoGame than for Unity that you can incorporate/look at..

Several game development books has been written for X/M. But there's probably loads of resources for Unity, I don't know.

</edit>

Edited by jacmoe

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Its not just about the AI, its also about unit control - I intend to do away with that old "select that unit - move it there" mechanic.

 

By the way, does MonoGame have advanced features such as Shading?

Edited by BigBadBeef

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