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ramo55

Unity What language is this made in?

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Just a quick question, Wanted to know what language was this game made in: http://clawmark.itch.io/titan-souls-demo

 

Is it made in java? c++? or what? and can it be done using unity?

 

Finally, what style of game is this? is it a 2.5d game or an isometric type? I'm trying to find tutorials but I have no idea what i'm looking for as im not sure what type it is, could if be a platformer?

 

Thanks.

Edited by ramo55

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I don't really see how knowing what this particular game was written in can help in anything, but here goes:

After investigating the windows package I'd make a strong educated guess that it's C++ (and of course parts might be written and linked as pure C, since that is no problem technically).

Why? Without poking too too deep and without specialized tools:

1. There are a lot of PE32 dlls, some of which are widely used C libs.

2. Executable too is PE32.

3. There is this string in the executable, hinting at the compiler*: "GCC: (GNU) 4.9.0 20130525 (experimental)".
4. There are strings in there (exe) that look like C names and mangled C++ names*.

5. There are these paths in there:

C:\repos\New Engine\SOURCE\UTIL\TmxParser\tinyxml\tinyxmlparser.cpp
C:\repos\New Engine\SOURCE\UTIL\TmxParser\tinyxml\tinyxml.h
C:\repos\New Engine\SOURCE\UTIL\TmxParser\tinyxml\tinyxml.cpp
hinting that tinyxml is used, but I can't guess why they are there, I thought it might be from __FILE__ macros used in error messages, but there don't seem to be any (except for one on android) in tinyxml.h and tinyxml.cpp on github.

... (the list goes on, but it's just more of the same - symbol names, strings, guesses ect.)

Of course this is all educated guessing AND it's always possible this was written in a language that is source compiled to C/C++ in the end (Haxe can do this, among numerous other backends), but chances are slim.

 

*although if you want to troll someone who is doing what I'm doing right now, you can include strings with names of all common toolkits function names and programming language toolchains in your exectuable to throw the "investigators" like me off, that'd be fun, and I don't think this is going on in here.

Edited by FRex

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I'm at work so a lot of stuff is blocked, but I do know the original demo made for the game jam was Adobe Flash and a bunch of sites say it was ported to a 'new engine', although I can't see details beyond that. I found a journal entry from the developer from Dec 2013 saying "I’ve got a pretty solid version of the game running with adobe AIR, but maybe I should port it over to C++ for a more stable game and things like actual controller support if I continue it further." so probably either AIR or something using C++. As for the 2d perspective used, this link seems to explain what it is as 3/4 perspective. I believe 2.5d is a more generic term for making 2d look kinda like 3d and thus includes several art styles. Another overview of different types of projections (although it doesn't get into 3/4 perspective) is here.

 

It's definitely not platformer, that's more of a gameplay style than an art style.

 

According to this Unity can do it.

 

 

I don't really see how knowing what this particular game was written in can help in anything, but here goes:

After investigating the windows package I'd make a strong educated guess that it's C++ (and of course parts might be written and linked as pure C, since that is no problem technically).

Why? Without poking too too deep and without specialized tools:

1. There are a lot of PE32 dlls, some of which are widely used C libs.

2. Executable too is PE32.

3. There is this string in the executable, hinting at the compiler*: "GCC: (GNU) 4.9.0 20130525 (experimental)".
4. There are strings in there (exe) that look like C names and mangled C++ names*.

5. There are these paths in there:

C:\repos\New Engine\SOURCE\UTIL\TmxParser\tinyxml\tinyxmlparser.cpp
C:\repos\New Engine\SOURCE\UTIL\TmxParser\tinyxml\tinyxml.h
C:\repos\New Engine\SOURCE\UTIL\TmxParser\tinyxml\tinyxml.cpp
hinting that tinyxml is used, but I can't guess why they are there, I thought it might be from __FILE__ macros used in error messages, but there don't seem to be any (except for one on android) in tinyxml.h and tinyxml.cpp on github.

... (the list goes on, but it's just more of the same - symbol names, strings, guesses ect.)

Of course this is all educated guessing AND it's always possible this was written in a language that is source compiled to C/C++ in the end (Haxe can do this, among numerous other backends), but chances are slim.

 

*although if you want to troll someone who is doing what I'm doing right now, you can include strings with names of all common toolkits function names and programming language toolchains in your exectuable to throw the "investigators" like me off, that'd be fun, and I don't think this is going on in here.

 

Thanks so much guys!! Your replies really helped alot, personally I think the game is made in c++ since the majority of you said its most likely c++. Also thanks for the link: http://answers.unity3d.com/questions/500995/how-to-implement-a-34-perspective-camera.html

 

Exactly what I was looking for!

 

Is there any other game engines you guys would recommend that allow making perspective games like that?

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I don't really see how knowing what this particular game was written in can help in anything, but here goes:

After investigating the windows package I'd make a strong educated guess that it's C++ (and of course parts might be written and linked as pure C, since that is no problem technically).

Why? Without poking too too deep and without specialized tools:

1. There are a lot of PE32 dlls, some of which are widely used C libs.

2. Executable too is PE32.

3. There is this string in the executable, hinting at the compiler*: "GCC: (GNU) 4.9.0 20130525 (experimental)".
4. There are strings in there (exe) that look like C names and mangled C++ names*.

5. There are these paths in there:

C:\repos\New Engine\SOURCE\UTIL\TmxParser\tinyxml\tinyxmlparser.cpp
C:\repos\New Engine\SOURCE\UTIL\TmxParser\tinyxml\tinyxml.h
C:\repos\New Engine\SOURCE\UTIL\TmxParser\tinyxml\tinyxml.cpp
hinting that tinyxml is used, but I can't guess why they are there, I thought it might be from __FILE__ macros used in error messages, but there don't seem to be any (except for one on android) in tinyxml.h and tinyxml.cpp on github.

... (the list goes on, but it's just more of the same - symbol names, strings, guesses ect.)

Of course this is all educated guessing AND it's always possible this was written in a language that is source compiled to C/C++ in the end (Haxe can do this, among numerous other backends), but chances are slim.

 

*although if you want to troll someone who is doing what I'm doing right now, you can include strings with names of all common toolkits function names and programming language toolchains in your exectuable to throw the "investigators" like me off, that'd be fun, and I don't think this is going on in here.

The idea behind knowing what language it's made in, is to give me atleast in some way an idea of where to start, knowing the game was made in a particular language means, that it would be a good idea for me to start making my games in that language too and so on, now I know this might not be the best option/idea since they could of used a game engine and so on, but it's the only option I currently know off. Incase you were wondering, I'm aiming to make a game similair to that, doesn't have to be exactly like it or that perfect.

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FRex answered the question, but I am curious why this even matters? What language are you comfortable with? If your goal its to make a game like this, use that language. This could be made in C, C++, BASIC, Pascal, Assembly, Java, or a host of others. It really doesn't matter.

 

[edit]

I was typing as you posted, but still...

Edited by MarkS

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FRex answered the question, but I am curious why this even matters? What language are you comfortable with? If your goal its to make a game like this, use that language. This could be made in C, C++, BASIC, Pascal, Assembly, Java, or a host of others. It really doesn't matter.

 

[edit]

I was typing as you posted, but still...

I'm comfortable in c and c++ and java, but I have no idea where I would go about from their. The idea behind this was that I wanted to make a game like that one, but I wasn't sure if that was possible using these languages. I also wasn't sure of the name of this type of game, i.e. 2d? isometric? etc... and I also wasn't sure if it would be possible to make using unity, so thats why I made the thread :)

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The idea behind knowing what language it's made in, is to give me atleast in some way an idea of where to start, knowing the game was made in a particular language means, that it would be a good idea for me to start making my games in that language too and so on

 

 

Knowing what language a game was made in for this purpose means nothing. You can make that kind of game in just about any non-esoteric language. 

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Knowing the language that the game was written in and knowing the type of game are two separate questions.

 

 

The game looks to be a simple top-down sprite-based game. Just going by the video posted on their site, you could do this in C with just Windows GDI calls. Any modern game engine would be bored to tears with the simplicity of the game.

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I'm comfortable in c and c++

...

but I wasn't sure if that was possible using these languages.

 

any game can be made with C++.  its probably the only language that can claim that (other than assembly perhaps). other languages tend to have issues that make them unsuitable for particular types of games.

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any game can be made with C++.  its probably the only language that can claim that (other than assembly perhaps). other languages tend to have issues that make them unsuitable for particular types of games.


I think most languages are capable of creating most games. To create them with a good level of polish however and high definition graphics etc. requires more than your language itself as you need a way to write shaders and talk to the graphics card (which is hlsl or glsl) amongst a whole host of other language neutral stuff...

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