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On Rye

Progress on my Food-Based RPG - Adding dishes!

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A while ago, I asked if it was possible to make a food rpg [link to that post]. After receiving a lot of great advice, I've actually started making progress on it.

 

Game Snapshot: A childhood friend of yours (you are the protagonist) recently opened a restaurant in Metro City and wants you to be the co-owner. Create custom restaurant themes to attract customers, serve customers three-course meals composed of three dishes of your choice, hire talented chefs from several different classes, level them up for new dishes to add to the menu, and increase the national fame and ranking of your restaurant. Eventually, you may qualify for entry in the Diner Ring, the winner of which is invited to cook for the Chief of Rivulet Region (your country's leader)!

 

Right now, I'm working on creating various unlockable menu dishes for this game. My goal is to add at least 100 different dishes. Here's where I'd like your help.The following is a list of character classes. I was wondering if you had any ideas for possible dishes they could prepare, or thoughts on the gameplay of making those specific dishes.

 

Each dish would fall under one of these categories:

  1. Pastry Chef -- makes pastries and desserts, prepares baked goods including bread
  2. Sauce Chef -- prepares the sauces, soups, stews, and sautés
  3. Fish Chef -- prepares seafood dishes
  4. Fry Chef -- fries meat, potatoes, and vegetables
  5. Vegetable Chef -- prepares soups, vegetables, starches and egg dishes
  6. Grill Chef -- grills meat, poultry, and vegetables
  7. Pantry Chef -- prepares cold items such as appetizers, cheeses, and spreads
  8. Cook -- works under the various chefs

As an example, here's how I would classify a dish:

 

Dango > A sweet dumpling made of rice flour > Gameplay: Boiling > Class: Pastry Chef > Example

 

*Very Important Note (Please read this!): I'm certainly not asking you to do my research for me. I've already begun compiling an extensive list of foods and information about them. I'm only asking for your input. You might have been exposed to or seen foods I've never heard of, or thought of gameplay I never considered!

 

Thanks for your help thus far!

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Hmm... So am I correct in understanding that you're looking for regional dishes--koeksisters, for example--and not dishes common in the West--cheesecake, for example?

 

Additionally, what about dishes that might involve multiple classes, such as stews that include both meat (or fish) and vegetables?

 

One quick side-thought (if this was suggested in the previous thread then my apologies!): I see that you have a dedicated "sauce chef"--what about making that chef more or less the equivalent of the bard/cleric class in combat-oriented games, with sauces acting as "buffs" for meals, allowing you to more finely tailor a meal to a specific diner when called for?

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If restaurant themes are possible, you're going to want about the same number of dishes per theme, maybe?  Also, are dishes that take only one cooking process better than those that take more?  (E.g. pierogies need to be boiled then fried.  Bagels are boiled then baked.)

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Gameplay-wise, I think an important division would be things that you make on demand vs. things that you have to (or tend to) make ahead (esp. breads and many desserts, which take hours to make and would be made by your bakers and pastry chef in the wee hours of the morning). For an RPG analogy, make-ahead dishes are like Vancian spells, like in the original D&D, where mages queue up their spells well in advance of their use and anticipate what's going to be needed. So your "fighter" equivalents could be the fish, fry, and grill chefs, whereas your "mage" equivalents would be your pastry and pantry chefs. Like Thaumaturge said, the sauce chef is a bard, the mage type that enhances. Veg chefs are a bit in between.

One stat about restaurant dishes that cooking games sometimes (usually?) miss, and that might deepen gameplay for you, is how a dish scales when you need to make more than one. Some dishes take X amount of labor, and making 10 of them takes 10X labor, whereas some dishes might take Y amount of labor per unit, but making 10 of them only takes 2Y labor. That's why creme brulee is a classic restaurant dish that people don't tend to make at home; it's really inefficient just to make one or two of them, but very efficient to make a ton of, and they store well. Eggs benedict is similar; it's kind of annoying to make one or two of them, but if you've got a four hour period where people are going to order hundreds of them, then you're gold. The related stat to this would be how long you can store a dish after it's fully or partly made.

So anyway, I think one interesting thing would be to think of "make-ahead" counterparts to "on-demand" dishes, things make with the same ingredients but that you queue up like a Vancian spell. For example, if you have sushi, also have ceviche. You have to make it in advance of people ordering (because they can't wait for you to marinate the fish) but you also have a much longer "readiness" window once it's made. For every grilled item, have a slow-cooked BBQ version as well, etc. Edited by valrus

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Hmm... So am I correct in understanding that you're looking for regional dishes--koeksisters, for example--and not dishes common in the West--cheesecake, for example?

 

Additionally, what about dishes that might involve multiple classes, such as stews that include both meat (or fish) and vegetables?

 

One quick side-thought (if this was suggested in the previous thread then my apologies!): I see that you have a dedicated "sauce chef"--what about making that chef more or less the equivalent of the bard/cleric class in combat-oriented games, with sauces acting as "buffs" for meals, allowing you to more finely tailor a meal to a specific diner when called for?

 

Well...really, I'm looking for any kind of dish. There're lots of western dishes that I haven't heard of as well. Even if I have, there might be something more common like cheesecake that I happened to miss (I made note of cream pies, but not cheesecake for some reason!). I actually have a folder of food pictures sitting on my desktop. So if there's something you eat on a regular basis, a food you like, or even a regional dish like koeksister in mind, I can use the reference for sure. In any case, I just learned about a new food!

 

For multi-class dishes, it might make sense for the various chefs to work together--passing the dish along to the appropriate chef's station when they've finished. It might be necessary to hire the chef classes required before being allowed to make certain dishes. I was thinking about making the player a general purpose chef who can prepare dishes of any class, but only the ones that have been unlocked by the other chefs (who specialize in those dishes).

 

That's a great idea. I'll be sure to make note of that. Thanks!

 

If restaurant themes are possible, you're going to want about the same number of dishes per theme, maybe?  Also, are dishes that take only one cooking process better than those that take more?  (E.g. pierogies need to be boiled then fried.  Bagels are boiled then baked.)

 

Hmm. I didn't consider balancing the number of foods available for each theme, so thanks for bringing that up. I do want to have a relatively even amount of dishes available, but it's not something that would cause an issue for me right now. I suppose I could always balance them later on.

 

Dishes that take more than one cooking process, like the one you mentioned, would take longer to prepare; but it wouldn't affect the customer's rating. The dishes would be rated based on the cumulative quality of all the steps. But just now I realized that I might have misunderstood your question. Were you asking if I only wanted suggestions for dishes with one cooking process? If so, not at all! I'm open to any and everything you'd like to see in a food-based game. Thank you for responding!

 

 

Add some Indian stuff.

Like Kulfi.

Kulfi is yummy. Kinda like ice cream except homemade, and without the excessive amounts of sugar.

 

Will do! I did a quick search on that item as well just now and found it pretty appetizing. Creamier than ice cream? It takes longer to melt? Count me in. I do wonder if it'll be more difficult to find instructional videos for dishes from other countries. I'll just have to exercise my google-fu and find out! Thanks for the suggestion.

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I do wonder if it'll be more difficult to find instructional videos for dishes from other countries

This recipe seems alright: http://www.vegrecipesofindia.com/kulfi-recipe-basic-kulfi-recipe/

 

My family tends to use more 'modern' (Factory made :P) and readily available ingredients here in the US, such as heavy cream, whipping cream, half and half, etc.

Edited by Ovicior

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Gameplay-wise, I think an important division would be things that you make on demand vs. things that you have to (or tend to) make ahead (esp. breads and many desserts, which take hours to make and would be made by your bakers and pastry chef in the wee hours of the morning).  For an RPG analogy, make-ahead dishes are like Vancian spells, like in the original D&D, where mages queue up their spells well in advance of their use and anticipating what's going to be needed.  So your "fighter" equivalents could be the fish, fry, and grill chefs, whereas your "mage" equivalents would be your pastry and pantry chefs.  Like Thaumaturge said, the sauce chef is a bard, the mage type that enhances.  Veg chefs are a bit in between.
 

One stat about restaurant dishes that cooking games sometimes (usually?) miss, and that might deepen gameplay for you, is how a dish scales when you need to make more than one.  Some dishes take X amount of labor, and making 10 of them takes 10X labor, whereas some dishes might take Y amount of labor per unit, but making 10 of them only takes 2X labor.  That's why creme brulee is a classic restaurant dish that people don't tend to make at home; it's really inefficient just to make one or two of them, but very efficient to make a ton of, and they store well.  Eggs benedict is similar; it's kind of annoying to make one or two of them, but if you've got a four hour period where people are going to order hundreds of them, then you're gold.  The related stat to this would be how long you can store a dish after it's fully or partly made.

 

So anyway, I think one interesting thing would be to think of "make-ahead" counterparts to "on-demand" dishes, things make with the same ingredients but that you queue up like a Vancian spell.  For example, if you have sushi, also have ceviche.  You have to make it in advance of people ordering (because they can't wait for you to marinate the fish) but you also have a much longer "readiness" window once it's made.  For every grilled item, have a slow-cooked BBQ version as well, etc.

 

 

Wow, thanks! I think a lot of cooking games do miss that aspect of gameplay. It's a unique game mechanic, for sure, and I think it would make gameplay a lot more fun because now strategy and prediction are involved. It might be necessary to include a restaurant critic, trend-following, friend who occasionally gives the player hints for what sorts of dishes the locals might like to have. I played a casual stock-market sim a while ago, and there was a guy who would sometimes give hints as to which items would have higher stock values the next day. Something along those lines, so that the player won't waste a lot of ingredients preparing items that won't sell very well. Or, perhaps that's completely unnecessary. It depends on how everything falls into place once I add those mechanics. The player might be able to predict which dishes would sell the best based on what's popular at the moment.

 

Also, it's good to use those RPG analogies! It helps me understand how those concepts could apply to this game.

 

 

 


I do wonder if it'll be more difficult to find instructional videos for dishes from other countries

This recipe seems alright: http://www.vegrecipesofindia.com/kulfi-recipe-basic-kulfi-recipe/

 

My family tends to use more 'modern' (Factory made tongue.png) and readily available ingredients here in the US, such as heavy cream, whipping cream, half and half, etc.

 

 

Ok. It looks pretty good to me. Thanks for that link!

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I've watched a bunch of Food Network over the years and I noticed that in mystery box competitions the results tend to be like "I made a [base ingredient] [general technique] with a [some other paired ingredient] and [sauce]." That is, you have some assorted basic known forms of dishes and chefs apply one or more known techniques with whatever ingredients are available to attempt to result in flavor combinations and textures that are general seen as desirable for a given regional style of cooking. The result also being quite dependent on a chef's level of experience with each of these as well as fundamental skills like knife handling and time management.

It seems to me that there's a formula here which could perhaps allow for procedurally created dishes rather than having to be limited to a set of per-defined recipes. Although like any procedurally generated element, it could be pretty tough to get just right (and it might not fit with your current vision).

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I've watched a bunch of Food Network over the years and I noticed that in mystery box competitions the results tend to be like "I made a [base ingredient] [general technique] with a [some other paired ingredient] and [sauce]." That is, you have some assorted basic known forms of dishes and chefs apply one or more known techniques with whatever ingredients are available to attempt to result in flavor combinations and textures that are general seen as desirable for a given regional style of cooking. The result also being quite dependent on a chef's level of experience with each of these as well as fundamental skills like knife handling and time management.

It seems to me that there's a formula here which could perhaps allow for procedurally created dishes rather than having to be limited to a set of per-defined recipes. Although like any procedurally generated element, it could be pretty tough to get just right (and it might not fit with your current vision).

 

Great input! I think this allows for interesting end-game content. For instance, after completing the main story this form of gameplay can be unlocked. At that point the player can begin experimenting with that model in addition to using the dishes already unlocked, and will also have a better idea of how food construction works due to having made various dishes already throughout the game. That way, I can avoid [initially] confusing players with a large variety of options while still giving them the freedom to make whatever they like after they've had enough in-game experience.

 

Thanks for the suggestion! I also watch various food shows on occasion.

 

 

As far as gameplay design goes, I've narrowed cooking down to the following categories. I'm mostly using this list as a reference, but there's a more extensive list here.

 

Cooking_Reference.png

 

I'm not quite sure how I should format each of these. I imagine a minigame would trigger when the player wants to make a certain food, but I don't know how I would make each one unique and different. I have an idea of how I want to structure the boiling minigame though. When the player wants to boil something (say, dango for example), the items would be dropped into the boiling water sprite and the player would have to remove them after a set amount of time. This could be done with a timer (invisible to the player). The player would be given a visual indicator that the food is done, but if he or she doesn't react fast enough, it could overcook (subtracting points from the final score). For dango, the balls of dough float to the top when they're done (before screenshot and after screenshot, courtesy of Google images).

 

But how could I make this fun (sorry if my wording is weird there)? I was watching a Let's Play of Cook, Serve, Delicious and I was having fun just watching the guy play. That game uses button presses to prepare food (ex. press arrow keys in a certain order to slice fish). I'm struggling with design...

 

It's a bit important to note that I don't really intend to make a realistic simulation game. I'm hoping to use 3D model renders for the animations, but they more-than-likely won't be entirely photo-realistic. I just thought it was necessary to mention this so you'll know what the limitations are [and what they aren't, I suppose].

 

If you compare the following, my graphics would be a cross between the two:

 

resize_image.jpgtumblr_lhip176J9B1qhcocko1_500.jpg

Edited by On Rye

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Slicing might be better as cutting or chopping, since there are many different shapes one may need to cut things into, especially for ornamental things like a fruit bouquet or watermelon basket or a fancy bento.  Even grating and using a blender or food processor would probably go into that category.

 

Roasting is not actually a unique action, IMHO.  It's basically either baking or grilling, as the term can be used for both.  Further, grilling and frying are almost the same thing.  If you need a replacement I'd recommend the action of applying a liquid to a food, which includes icing, battering, basting, and brushing (e.g. brushing egg onto bread).

 

You also don't have a method of making food cold (chilling, freezing), but that's not as commonly used in cooking.  It's mainly used for making ice cream and pudding.  Similarly there isn't anything here about melting, such as melting butter or chocolate, but it's not a really common action.

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Slicing might be better as cutting or chopping, since there are many different shapes one may need to cut things into, especially for ornamental things like a fruit bouquet or watermelon basket or a fancy bento.  Even grating and using a blender or food processor would probably go into that category.

 

Ok. I'll group those categories into one.

 

 

 


Roasting is not actually a unique action, IMHO.  It's basically either baking or grilling, as the term can be used for both.  Further, grilling and frying are almost the same thing.  If you need a replacement I'd recommend the action of applying a liquid to a food, which includes icing, battering, basting, and brushing (e.g. brushing egg onto bread).

 

I see. In that case, it would make sense to combine roasting and grilling. Thanks for pointing that out! I don't really agree that grilling and frying are almost the same though, as frying involves the use of liquid whereas grilling involves applying dry heat to a food. I'll replace roasting with new category called Coating (which will encompass icing, battering, basting, and brushing).

 

 

 


You also don't have a method of making food cold (chilling, freezing), but that's not as commonly used in cooking.  It's mainly used for making ice cream and pudding.  Similarly there isn't anything here about melting, such as melting butter or chocolate, but it's not a really common action.

 

Oh, you're right. I completely missed that. I'll add chilling and freezing attributes to the pastry chef. Correct me if I'm wrong, but most dishes that use those methods are typically desserts, so it would fit perfectly.

 

Hmm, without using a microwave (not including that in-game), I think melting can be done with either Frying or Steaming. For example, butter can be melted in a pan (frying), but it would be better to steam the chocolate by putting it in a separate bowl over a pot of boiling water until it melts (steaming, but using a makeshift double boiler like this). I've actually done both before. Butter and chocolate are used in a lot of things, so it might be more common than you'd imagine.

 

Thanks for those suggestions!

Edited by On Rye

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Hmmm, shouldn't you market it as a tycoon instead of an RPG? I mean, you have hiring staff and don't have fighting monsters and drinking potions :) Do you have any other RPGish mechanic so you want to brand it as RPG?

I mean, players who look for RPGs will complain there are no monsters or quests and players who would love to play "restaurant manager" would not find it because they would search for tycoon/simulation.

 

BTW, check these for inspiration:

* Pizza Tycoon (also called Pizza Connections IIRC)

* Hilsea Lido (Amiga, try on emulator - not about food but somehow I felt it's related to your mood)

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Frying doesn't by definition require liquid - bacon, for example, is fried by simply tossing it into a hot pan and turning it over a few times.  With eggs you can fry them dry or add butter/margarine/ghee to lubricate the pan first.  This is comparable to greasing a baking pan; the purpose is to avoid the food sticking and getting torn up.  Frying with liquid as an _ingredient_ is Sautéing or stir-frying.  But it makes sense to combine all three.

 

I agree that a double-boiler is the pre-microwave standard way to melt chocolate and candy, and I also agree that it's basically the same as steaming. smile.png

 

Chilling is primarily for deserts, yes.  There are only a few weird dishes that that aren't deserts which use cold - shrimp cocktail, cold blueberry soup.  And the shrimp cocktail could instead have ice as an ingredient, just put it on the plate with the cooked shrimp.  Similarly if you have cocktails and mixed drinks or milkshakes, those mainly make use of ice or ice cream as an ingredient, so you could probably avoid chilling as a procedure.

 

Coating sounds like a good term.  smile.png  I haven't suggested any specific dishes yet, mainly because there are just overwhelmingly many things it's possible to cook.  Why don't you get back to me when you have a mostly-finished list and I'll half you fill in holes or even out numbers or whatever.  You can PM me if you don't want to post the list of dishes.

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Hmmm, shouldn't you market it as a tycoon instead of an RPG? I mean, you have hiring staff and don't have fighting monsters and drinking potions smile.png Do you have any other RPGish mechanic so you want to brand it as RPG?

I mean, players who look for RPGs will complain there are no monsters or quests and players who would love to play "restaurant manager" would not find it because they would search for tycoon/simulation.

 

BTW, check these for inspiration:

* Pizza Tycoon (also called Pizza Connections IIRC)

* Hilsea Lido (Amiga, try on emulator - not about food but somehow I felt it's related to your mood)

 

I wanted to make this game an RPG because it doesn't really focus on business sim elements. Rather, the gameplay involves leveling up your classes (chefs) to learn new abilities (dishes), gaining new party members (hiring new chefs), and general role-playing with an overarching story. I didn't discuss specific role-playing in this thread because I had a different question at the moment regarding dishes and gameplay. Regarding your concern about branding it as an RPG without the elements you mentioned, please see my previous thread (linked in the main post). Specifically, Thaumaturge's response to that post might answer your questions about that.

 

Thanks for those references. I'll check them out!

 


Frying doesn't by definition require liquid - bacon, for example, is fried by simply tossing it into a hot pan and turning it over a few times.  With eggs you can fry them dry or add butter/margarine/ghee to lubricate the pan first.  This is comparable to greasing a baking pan; the purpose is to avoid the food sticking and getting torn up.  Frying with liquid as an _ingredient_ is Sautéing or stir-frying.  But it makes sense to combine all three.

 

Actually, it does require some form of liquid. The reason why bacon and eggs could be fried without oil is because of the fat and the egg whites (both liquids). I've never tried frying these without oil though for the reason you mentioned (it would stick to the pan).

 


Chilling is primarily for deserts, yes.  There are only a few weird dishes that that aren't deserts which use cold - shrimp cocktail, cold blueberry soup.  And the shrimp cocktail could instead have ice as an ingredient, just put it on the plate with the cooked shrimp.  Similarly if you have cocktails and mixed drinks or milkshakes, those mainly make use of ice or ice cream as an ingredient, so you could probably avoid chilling as a procedure.

 

Oh, I didn't know that. Thanks for sharing that information!

 


Coating sounds like a good term.    I haven't suggested any specific dishes yet, mainly because there are just overwhelmingly many things it's possible to cook.  Why don't you get back to me when you have a mostly-finished list and I'll half you fill in holes or even out numbers or whatever.  You can PM me if you don't want to post the list of dishes.

 

Thanks! Actually, I'll post my list here when I have more time. But I might just do that as well. I appreciate the offer for sure!

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Ok guys, this is my current list of unlockable dishes. Please feel free to suggest more items for this list. You don't have to research them. I'll take care of that part. But if you could just post the names of the foods you'd like to see in this game, I would greatly appreciate it. It is important that I finish this game before autumn (fall), perhaps sooner.

 

Click to see what they look like. I had to find all the images online again to link to them here.

  1. Aloo Pie
  2. Apple Pie
  3. Baked Potato
  4. Baked Stuffed Peppers
  5. Baklavas
  6. Batata Vada
  7. Beef Curry and Rice
  8. Black Beans and Rice
  9. Cabbage Rice Noodle Pancakes
  10. Canelé
  11. Cherry Pie
  12. Chicken Curry and Rice
  13. Chiles Rellenos
  14. Chili Sin Carne
  15. Chocolate Lava Cake
  16. Cream Horns
  17. Cream Pie
  18. Creamy Carrot Soup
  19. Crème Brûlée
  20. Crispy Waffles
  21. Croissants
  22. Éclair
  23. Enchiladas
  24. Fa Gao
  25. Fruit Sorbet
  26. Gobi Manchurian
  27. Gomae Salad
  28. Granola Parfait
  29. Grilled Cheese Sandwich
  30. Hanami Dango
  31. Jelly Roll
  32. Mille-Feuille
  33. Mitarashi Dango
  34. Mozzarella Sticks
  35. Mushroom Soup
  36. Omurice
  37. Onigiri
  38. Onion Rings
  39. Pasta Bean Soup
  40. Pea Soup
  41. Pecan Pie
  42. Potato Soup
  43. Potato Wedges
  44. Quesadilla
  45. Ramen
  46. Ratatouille
  47. Rice Pudding
  48. Seafood Chowder
  49. Shrimp Noodle Stir Fry
  50. Spaghetti and Meatballs
  51. Spring Rolls
  52. Spring Rolls (Veggie)
  53. Sticky Buns
  54. Strawberry Shortcake
  55. Taiyaki
  56. Tempura
  57. Tomato Bruschetta
  58. Tomato Soup
  59. Turnover
  60. Vegetable Sandwich [1] [2]
  61. Vegetable Sauté

Thaumaturge adds Koeksisters

Ovicior adds Kulfi

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I might also suggest the following, in no particular order:

Chakalaka (Described by Wikipedia as a "vegetable relish")

Tomato Bredie (A stew)

Frikkadel (A type of meatball)

Malva Pudding (A dessert)

Melktert/Milk Tart (Another dessert; essentially a custard tart)

Vetkoek (A fried bread that can be used for either sweet or savoury purposes)

Boerewors (A type of sausage)

 

This page includes some South African foods, including the above, while this page is a broader list of African dishes, I believe.

Edited by Thaumaturge

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Hmm, I see what you mean about bacon making it's own liquid.  Not sure about pancakes, but maybe the pancake batter is the liquid.

 

Azuki Bean Ice Cream

Bacon-Wrapped Water Chestnuts

Biscuits and Sausage Gravy

Bison Burger

Barbeque Chicken Pizza

California Rolls

Calzone

Cheeseburger

Cherry Spice Bread

Chocolate Mousse

Cookies (Lace Cookies are a particularly unusual variety, as are Pizzelles.)

Coconut Soup

Cranberry Orange Muffins

Green Tea Mochi (also Taro Mochi)

Ham With Pineapple Rings

Lasagna

Mashed Pumpkin

Milkshake

Pancakes

Pickled Turnips

Pineapple Souffle

Quiche

Rabbit Fricassee

Sauerkraut (usually with dumplings)

Scallops

Southwest Chicken Salad (grilled chicken, corn relish, tortilla strips, cherry tomatoes, greens)

Steak

Steamed Lobster (or Crab Legs)

Sweet Corn Cake

Tamales

Venison Stew

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All these national/regional/ethnic specialties will be great for your game's social sharability.  I'd put the share buttons right on the announcement ("You've learned how to make CURRYWURST!"), and right there, your players in greater Berlin will start publicizing your game for you.  That "OMG THIS GAME KNOWS ABOUT X!!!" player reaction is absolute gold for you -- figuratively and literally.

 

(Actually, packs of regional specialties would make awesome DLC.  I wouldn't bat an eye at paying an extra $2-5 each to download recipe packs from the regions I've lived in.)

 

A quick trip around the world:

 

Lobster roll
Poutine
Mole poblano
Pupusa
Tostones/patacones
Ceviche, papas a la Huancaina, or lomo saltado
Feijoada
Fufu
Doro Wat
Colcannon
Chicken tikka masala
Poffertjes or nasi goreng
Currywurst or doner kebab
Wiener schnitzel or Kaiserschmarrn
Goulash

Borscht

Latkes

Pierogi

Paella

Moussaka
Lahmacun
Khachapuri
Chelow kabab

Masala dosa

Laphet thoke

Tom yam pla
Laksa
Halo halo
Char siu
Dandan noodles
Bulgogi or bibimbap

 

Btw, very important cooking action that's missing: marinating/pickling/soaking.

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Wow. Thanks for the suggestions, everyone. laugh.png

 


All these national/regional/ethnic specialties will be great for your game's social sharability.  I'd put the share buttons right on the announcement ("You've learned how to make CURRYWURST!"), and right there, your players in greater Berlin will start publicizing your game for you.  That "OMG THIS GAME KNOWS ABOUT X!!!" player reaction is absolute gold for you -- figuratively and literally.
 
(Actually, packs of regional specialties would make awesome DLC.  I wouldn't bat an eye at paying an extra $2-5 each to download recipe packs from the regions I've lived in.)

 

I didn't consider adding social aspects to this game but, now that you mention it, it might not be a bad idea. It's something I would add after everything else is finished maybe. You might think this is weird, but I've never used Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, or anything else related to social media in that capacity (not sure if this counts). So it's going to be a bit of a challenge figuring everything out when I eventually have to use some form of promotion to create a following for my games. Haha...oh well.

 

I imagine it would make for good DLC. Thanks for that encouragement. On the other hand, I'd feel more comfortable including that content from the outset. Pay once and get all the features right there without having to pay more money. I think that's fair. smile.png That model might be better for free-to-play games, as it's a way to support the developers (so they can earn enough revenue to pay their bills and continue making games).

 


Btw, very important cooking action that's missing: marinating/pickling/soaking.

 

Hmm. I could include this as a cooking action. Because it wouldn't require as much gameplay, it would be an occasional category.

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Btw, very important cooking action that's missing: marinating/pickling/soaking.

 

Hmm. I could include this as a cooking action. Because it wouldn't require as much gameplay, it would be an occasional category.

 

Perhaps it could be like charging up for a turn before an attack - soaking increases the flavor or improves the texture so it's like a buff or bonus?

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Btw, very important cooking action that's missing: marinating/pickling/soaking.

 

Hmm. I could include this as a cooking action. Because it wouldn't require as much gameplay, it would be an occasional category.

 

Perhaps it could be like charging up for a turn before an attack - soaking increases the flavor or improves the texture so it's like a buff or bonus?

 

 

Oh, that's clever!  Especially for marinating, since that's usually optional.  (Like a pickle isn't a pickle unless you pickle it, but a chicken dish is still a chicken dish if you don't marinate it, it's just not quite as good.)

 

Speaking of turns, were you thinking of having a turn-based or real-time... uh... "battle system" equivalent?  Or something in between, like KoTOR (technically short turns but portrayed as if simultaneous and done in realtime) or SNES/PS2 Final Fantasy "Active Time"?

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Btw, very important cooking action that's missing: marinating/pickling/soaking.

 

Hmm. I could include this as a cooking action. Because it wouldn't require as much gameplay, it would be an occasional category.

 

Perhaps it could be like charging up for a turn before an attack - soaking increases the flavor or improves the texture so it's like a buff or bonus?

 

 

Great idea! I'll use it as a stat bonus of sorts.

 


Speaking of turns, were you thinking of having a turn-based or real-time... uh... "battle system" equivalent?  Or something in between, like KoTOR (technically short turns but portrayed as if simultaneous and done in realtime) or SNES/PS2 Final Fantasy "Active Time"?

 

I don't know if I'll have a battle system equivalent. cool.png What did you have in mind? In my first topic about this game, I believe someone mentioned a sort of combat where the player battles the dishes. An interesting concept. Someone also mentioned having "loot drops" after getting a good score from a customer. I was leaning toward a time management form of gameplay (see Cook, Serve, Delicious). I want the cooking in my game to be a little more in-depth though, and I do want to have an overworld, where the player can actually walk around the restaurant and the city.

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