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Onequestiononly2

Remaking Mario 64 from scratch, how long?

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Okay, so I'm currently making my own 2D platformer game. I have little knowledge about programming, but I'm able to make my own adventure game in Flashpunk.

 

How long would it take with today's technology to remake almost all of Mario 64 for one person with no previous skills in 3D gaming, but with pretty good skills in 2D gaming?

 

2 years of hardcore work, 16 hours per day?

10 years of hardcore work, 16 hours per day?

 

All of this includes learning 3D gaming whilst starting the development and doing the art alone. The sounds and music too, but you don't need to account for that.
 

Thank you

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Cut your days to 8 hours, and get plenty of rest, and between 2-12 years.

 

Odds are you'll learn so much in the first 5 years you'll have a "bigger and better" idea to move on to. Or you're realize that working on long-term projects ARE work, and aren't fun, unless you only toss on a few hours a day max.

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how long is a very bad question in the world of software development.

 

i have little knowledge doesnt tell so much. no one really knows you capabilities. how much a project take long depends on many different parameters. which tools are you using.

how much you know about them and you are comfortable with them. how your algorithms and procedures that you are writing for your game are complicated.

 

sometimes you are a very good programmer but you have to implement an algorithm that is so hard and maybe you work very fast but you get stock on that algorithm or gameplay. it doesnt just about a solo developer like you. you simply can see many big companies that care so much about quality like rockstar delay manytimes their release because they want better game.

 

i just can you tell some simple things. try to make a good architecture for your code implementations. maybe you say its boring and take longer time but it makes development simpler and faster. next one is protoype all your gameplay you want and make sure that is all you want and all of them work good and after that start art and level design

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Maybe a bit off topic, but I would definately be willing to pay a few bucks for a good remake. Unfortunately nintendo and the world of law and all non-shared interests wont let this happen. Memories about the introduction are always good to remember :)

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Maybe a bit off topic, but I would definately be willing to pay a few bucks for a good remake. Unfortunately nintendo and the world of law and all non-shared interests wont let this happen. Memories about the introduction are always good to remember smile.png

Dude, what are you talking about? They gave you the remake on the DS a couple years ago. You can play the original in Virtual Console. Nintendo has not abandoned that property.

Edited by Promit

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Time estimation for project is often quite hard and I have experienced (myself and of others) miscalculation of 2x, 3x or larger when the team estimated for themselves using detailed specifications for far smaller scope projects.

 

Now you are asking us to estimate using no written project specification and no knowledge or your skills. Man... this just can't be accurate smile.png

 

Believe me - YOU are the best person to tell how long it could take. If you have no idea *now*, then split it to smaller parts and start coding. As you progress you should get better idea how long it can take.

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Maybe a bit off topic, but I would definately be willing to pay a few bucks for a good remake. Unfortunately nintendo and the world of law and all non-shared interests wont let this happen. Memories about the introduction are always good to remember smile.png

Dude, what are you talking about? They gave you the remake on the DS a couple years ago. You can play the original in Virtual Console. Nintendo has not abandoned that property.

 

For the PC I only now the emulator version which doesn't like quite well

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The amount of assets comprising the game is pretty gigantic, though.

 

Quantity is an issue, but the low fidelity of the old assets and better tools of today can certainly save some time -- plus the design and tweaking is already done if we're talking about a literal clone, so no iterations. Its way easier to get where you're going when you know exactly where that is.

 

 

All of that said, if we're not talking about the kind of clone that Nintendo's gonna shut down, and you're talking about a new project of similar design, scope, and execution you're back at square one, where low-fi assets save you some, but not bucket-loads of, time.

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It will take about this long, note not to scale smile.png   Start |------------------------------------------| End

 

Just trying to show that the reality for software is that the bigger a project the harder it is to determine time. So many factors come into play

Edited by WozNZ

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I am not really bothering with the elephant because I don't believe that the OP will even start this project, let alone carry it out. It sounds like a hypothetical question. ;)

I mean: who can reserve 10 years, or even 2 years, for a project like this? Real Life is sure to come along and mess it all up. And you gotta eat and have a place to crash, and you need electricity for the computer..

 

 

Mmm, you guys are replying to someone named Onequestiononly2, with 1 post. Smells of troll.

Silly question by the way.

I know I am more than a little naive, but I don't immediately assume that posts like this are the work of a troll. To me, this seems like a kid, probably in their teens, that has made a few simple games and thinks that they can totally take on a project like this. Not going to happen.

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Okay, so I'm currently making my own 2D platformer game. I have little knowledge about programming, but I'm able to make my own adventure game in Flashpunk.
 
How long would it take with today's technology to remake almost all of Mario 64 for one person with no previous skills in 3D gaming, but with pretty good skills in 2D gaming?
 
2 years of hardcore work, 16 hours per day?
10 years of hardcore work, 16 hours per day?
 
All of this includes learning 3D gaming whilst starting the development and doing the art alone. The sounds and music too, but you don't need to account for that.
 
Thank you

 

First, I'm going to assume this is a foray into theoretical programming only, and that you have all assets made available to you in a working format for whatever platform you end up using.

Second, I'm going to assume you're going for a straight clone of the original game with no mechanic changes whatsoever.

Third, The plan is to publish on Nintendo 64 (assuming that's still possible, which I assume isn't).

Fourth, You have access to a N64 Devkit, and some form of documentation of how to dev for N64 (SDK documentation should be provided by 1st party, in this case, Nintendo). 

 

Derailing from either of the above principles, this analysis has absolutely NO value.

Now, since some of these principles are simply put "impossible", please help me gauge your current appreciate of the work at hand. Namely, what platform?

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Third, The plan is to publish on Nintendo 64 (assuming that's still possible, which I assume isn't).
Fourth, You have access to a N64 Devkit, and some form of documentation of how to dev for N64 (SDK documentation should be provided by 1st party, in this case, Nintendo). 


Lets be fair.  He did say in his original post "Using todays technology". 

 

I'm guessing the question is how long would it take a novice using all the modern technology such as Unity / UDK, Mixanimo, MakeHuman etc.. in comparison with the original developers who worked as a bigger team but still having to write everything themselves and using much less capable tools.

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Lets be fair.  He did say in his original post "Using todays technology". 

 

Tech ok. Still does not tell me what the end-platform is though. I can't assume this is going to be PC, or Wii-U or PS4/X-One just because of the term "today's technology".

Some people also make Commodore 64 games using today's tech actually, but that's besides the point. My point is: some platforms are easier than others, and one does need to start delving into which platform(s) prior to choosing what tech. These are all steps of a serious project plan.

 


I'm guessing the question is how long would it take a novice using all the modern technology such as Unity / UDK, Mixanimo, MakeHuman etc.. in comparison with the original developers who worked as a bigger team but still having to write everything themselves and using much less capable tools.

 

And without the limitations of the original machine? That's a PRETTY BIG deal here. Fitting Mario 64 on the N64 must've been a daunting task as it was utilizing a lot of new tech for a new console and it had to fit within RAM, with good framerate on a CPU/GPU pair that would be considered obsolete by today's standards.

It's almost as daunting as down-porting a AAA game to a lesser generation (which I've done in a very recent past myself).

 

Truth be told, a lot of older games, if they were developed today, would probably take less time more importantly because of looser tech restrictions than the actual velocity earned from better engines/tools (not saying there wouldn't be a significant improvement there, but I feel like tech reqs are a bigger deal).

 

For example, one can make Zelda: A Link to the Past in unity in virtually very little time (game mechanics probably taking under a week to nail down, given how extensively useful Unity's 2D support has grown). The rest would be level design.

Now, the original team had to fit this into memory: levels, almost pixel-perfect collisions (without using a crazy system), etc.

Point being that you can make a largely unoptimized clone of Z:ALTTP almost effortlessly.

 

I anticipate that Mario 64 would gain a lot from having no platform requirements based on today's machines. Can use models as is, can put everything in memory (no asset management, etc.) no level occlusion (can probably fit entire levels into memory given their limited size) and can go with quite costly but simple methods to handle collisions and physics. When you're not dealing with tech constraints, you get a lot of room to work with and it makes it easier.

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