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Woody FX

Why use Game Development engines??

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Why would people use game development tools such as the Quake engines and the Infinty Engines for Baldurs gate... What other onces are there and could you tell me abit about them?

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Yeah what are examples of good engines and packages for making these so called games....

Are games with made engines really as great a feat as a game written straight fromm your own head instaed of sticking bits together using an engine?

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Look at the games that use an engine and make your decision.

Quake, Quake2, Quake3, Doom, Doom 2, Heretic, Heretic2, Hexen, Hexen2, Halflife, Sin, Soldier of Fortune, Duke Nukem 3D, Shadow Warrior, NAM, Redneck Rampage, Terminal Velocity, Unreal, Unreal2, Unreal Tournament, Tribes, Tribes2, Anachronox, Max Payne, Serious Sam, Laser Arena, Interstate 82...

And thats only beginning to scratch the surface of games that use an engine that has been used in other games, or is being used in upcomming games.

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I guess it all depends on why you are writing the game. If it is for educational purposes or to feel that you have really achieved something, why not write it yourself?

If you are treating it as more of a commercial venture, it makes sense to reduce the development costs therefore maximising the profits from the game itself.
This also allows you to spend more time on the strategy and gameplay, hopefully making it more enjoyable to play. In my opinion many games seem to be somewhere in the middle, using established engines for speed of development but not concentrating so much on gameplay. Only my opinion.

Of course another thing is flexibility - if you write your own engine you can make it exactly the way you want it. If you use a library you may not be able to easily add functionality that you want.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Yes...yes...yes of course.....

For reducing develophment time!!

Who writes game engines and why.....if you are goin to the trouble of writing an engine.....why the hell not go and do the feckin game!! Surly thats where the money is....

I''m doin a project now and The lecture over me keeps trying to push me in the direction of using some Game creator packages...and side tracking me by telling me to do a Power point Presentation on these packages....i want to just get on with doing my feckin game!!

It''s goin to be a game along the lines of commando''s (2D Isometric)!

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quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
Who writes game engines and why.....if you are goin to the trouble of writing an engine.....why the hell not go and do the feckin game!! Surly thats where the money is....



That''s not necessarily true (that the game is really where the money is) but really, the companies making the engines are usually doing a game to go with it (such as id... they''ve had their engines licensed plenty of times). A lot of the time though these companies don''t license engines just for chump change... and I don''t know how often royalties factor in.

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A lot of the reason that people create engines for the games is because they can represent a lot of common tasks with different functions that they call multiple times. Say you wrote a 3d Shooter Game (FPS) and you want a function like: Shoot(), ReloadGun(), ChangeGun(). If you wrote an engine that did these three things, you could call them many times from within different parts of your game. Then when you come out with another shooter game that is different and with different artwork, different story, etc. you will be able to use the same engine to do the common tasks of shooting, reloading guns, and changing guns. This way you have one game engine for 3d shooting that you can use for all the games that you develop like it.

~Andrew Clark

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I think the programmers behind games like UT and Q3 are beyond the whole "oooh I did it all by myself from scratch!" phase in their career- I think they just want the game out there.

You ask why use engines? well, why use DX or OpenGL? why use C even when ASM is faster and more efficient? Why use an assembler when you can enter 1s and 0s?

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Guest Anonymous Poster

1)why use engines?
2)why use DX or OpenGL?
3)why use C even when ASM is faster and more efficient?
4)Why use an assembler when you can enter 1s and 0s?

Why??

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Guest Anonymous Poster
seeings how Q2 came out not too many months before HL I doubt they COULD have used the Q2 engine. Its a matter of logic

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Guest Anonymous Poster
most engines are modified futher(stuff is added) like the guy above says, valve improved the ai and some other stuff in the quake engine.

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Guest Anonymous Poster

ive got this great tool..its called the make_game.exe
its got radio check boxes for bunches and bunches of stuffs like "fun gameplay," "rich environments," and "bitchin texturework".
its just point click and go!


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Quake II is just a modified version of Quake anyway. As for time of release, I''m reminded of Star Teck Voyager: Away Force (or whatever it was called). It was developed using the Q3 engine, but while Q3 was still under development (albeit towards the end of engine development). They continuously recieved new builds as the Id guys added new stuff, meaning they had to change their code to fit in. Go find the article on Gamastura if you''re interested...

Some companies do in fact deal only with engine development: LithTech, and a few others I can''t remember the names of . As an example of pricing, Id was (last year, I think) licencing a non-GNU version of Quake for just $250000. Bleeding-edge systems fetch much more!

Simon Wilson,
XEOS Digital Development

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Guest Anonymous Poster
http://www.idsoftware.com/corporate/idtech/index.html

Quake 1: Free
Quake 2: $125,000
Quake 3: $300,000 guarantee against an 8% royalty of the wholesale (whatever that means)

-Micah

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Making a game when you already have an engine written is a whole lot easier. If everyone just made games based off of other engines however the technology behind the games wouldn''t progress so you would just end up with a bunch of the same game just with different plots and models.

If everyone made thier own engine then there would be far less games on the market because everyone would have to spend so much time on producing a new engine for every game.

-Micah

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