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saeZ

distros (I'm not a newbie)

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Hello, I was just curious, which distros are you people using? I have experience from a big bunch of distros (all the way back from the year 1997), but somehow I haven''t found a suitable one for me. I have tried Slackware, SuSE, Red Hat, Mandrake, Turbolinux, and many more, but... Well, I was happy with Mandrake 8.0, but then I made a mistake: I upgraded (well re-installed the whole system) it to 8.1. 8.1 is SLOW and HEAVY! Otherwise things work just fine. I want up-to-date software, a stable and relatively fast system, and a working package managing (no dependency hell). I''m using Linux mainly for developing, so I need all the nice libraries and compilers and IDE''s available. My puter is AMD Duron 600. I would like to hear about some alternative distros if you people have experience from them, but any tips and suggestions are very welcomed! Thank you. saeZ

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Guest Anonymous Poster
I played with Linux some time ago. Tried out quite a few variants and found Mandrake to be my personal favorite (but this was back when they were at version 5.3 so I''m not certain if that still holds true).

But anyway, unless you''re developing Linux only software, I''d recommend FreeBSD as a damn good option. I went BSD a year ago and haven''t looked back at Linux since. Give it a whirl, you might like it too.

That''s about the best I can tell you, hope it was somewhat helpful.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
I started with Slackware around 1996, today I still use it, along with SuSE and Debian (no windows computer).

You want a working package management system but no dependencies? Even source code has dependencies, or I''m totally mistaking your comment. I find Debian''s DEB packages much nicer than RH/SuSE/Mandrake''s RPM, but none of them will remove dependencies. The only way would be to compile everything yourself and link statically and then uninstall the library it depends on. Bad idea IMO. Now if you want a really nice package system that owns both DEB and RPM, you might want to try a *BSD (I use OpenBSD too). Of course they don''t have as much hardware support as Linux, but I thought I''d mention it anyway. It should be possible to compile KDE and KDevelop on all the *BSD, as well as Gnome and almost all of the Linux software (if not, there is a Linux emulation layer ).

Really, if you need all the IDE/graphical tools, use one of the mainstream distros (ie RH, SuSE, Mandrake, Debian). You best choice might be to reinstall Mandrake 8.0 and just update the software rather than the whole system.

Finally, the best alternative to all of this is probably to do a Linux From Scratch (http://www.linuxfromscratch.org). It basically explains how to install Linux without a distro, so that you don''t end installing 500 packages you''ll never use.

That''s it, I really can''t think of any alternative distro that wouldn''t be too specific (most are for embedded systems and/or improved security, like Peanut and Bastille, respectively). I hope this will help somewhat.

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In Linux I prefer slackware(fast, good package manager which doesn''t require package dependancies, relatively quite up to date software - but definitely not bleeding edge software).

From your post I think you want BSD which has all those stuffs. Fast, good package manager. Only doubt I have is about up to date softwares.

If you really still want some distro which has all that I suppose you would have to custom built distro which will have everything you want.

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Thanks for the replies. BSDs huh... Well I know Free/Open/BSD and I find them interesting,
but I''m not going to change from my fav OS. Yea I know I complained about distros,
but in overall they have all worked well. But there''s just something missing. FreeBSD
idea is intriguing and I know some people say it is more stable and faster than Linux,
but right now I don''t care about those issues because every Linux-distro I''ve tried has
been extremely stable and fast (except RH and Mandrake 8.1). FreeBSD doesn''t offer me
anything crucial. NOTE: I''m not saying Linux is better than FreeBSD or vice versa, but
I just want to stick with the penguin.

What I meant with "dependency hell" was mainly the RPM structure in Mandrake. It is
just ridiculous! I love Mandrake, but the package dependency in it is just nuts (IMO
IMO IMO). Debian is veryvery interesting, BUT I won''t get very up-to-date software with
it.

About package managing, I know dependencies are always there and I''m not complaining
about that. I just need something better.. maybe it''s not made yet. Maybe I didn''t make
any sense with any of this. Oh well...

saeZzzz..

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For game development/playing I recommend Red Hat Linux.

If that is not to your taste then next up is Mandrake
Linux, however it has some issues with its Mesa3D/GL and
hardware accelerated driver packages at the moment.

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Slackware, dude!

The only other distro I''ve used is SuSE, which is also nice in that it''s user-friendly (without taking ALL of the actual Linux experience away from you ) and it comes with TONS of software. I''m happy with Slackware though, and as such, I probably won''t be trying any new distros on *my* computer

rm -rf /bin/laden

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quote:

I''m not saying Linux is better than FreeBSD or vice versa, but
I just want to stick with the penguin.



Hmmm... I think I chose BSD for the same reasons you''re sticking with Linux. Something about the BSD Daemon just appealed to my heretical heathen mind.

As far as Linux distro''s go, it all depends on what you want. OpenLinux is good for networking, Red Hat and Mandrake are pretty good for development IMO, I''m not certain just what exactly Corel Linux is good for so if someone could tell me I''d appreciate it. I needed tighter security so I went with BSD, although before that I was quite happy with Solaris. It''s all in what you want. Best suggestion I have is to go to linuxmall.com and buy a bunch of their cheap 2$ CDs of the various Linux distros and try them out first hand.

Hope I''ve helped.



If only debugging were as easy as killing cockroaches... *sigh*

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Hiyall,

I changed my Mandrake 8.1 system to Slackware 8.0 today. My first reaction was: "Where''s the eyecandy?", but my second reaction was: "Wow this is fast!". Yep, I love my new system. Slackware has everything I need. Even though I have to do all configurations manually, it doesn''t matter. At last I have a stable and fast system up and running. The eyecandy problem is now fixed too. Of course I need some time to adjust to this new wonderful distro, but so far so good; everything works as well as in Mandrake (if not even better).

saeZ

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quote:
I changed my Mandrake 8.1 system to Slackware 8.0 today.

Congratulations! Slackware rocks!!!

rm -rf /bin/laden

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Hmm, I just changed from Windows to Mandrake 8.1 and found the whole process terrific. I am now focusing on programming games for Linux. What is this slackware you have been speaking of and should I wait until I know more about Linux before trying it. My system is rocking now with ML 8.1 so should I even think about fixing it? I mean it isnt really broken.

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Slackware indeed rocks. The only downside for a newbie is that one has to do more manual tweaking than, for example, in Mandrake. But the best part is that things actually work!

saeZ

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Yeah, the only "downside" to Slackware is that there''s far fewer graphical-based configuration tools for it (though there are many menu-based ones). Basically, using Slackware requires enough knowledge to manually configure some things. However, I started out on Slackware, and really had no problem with it. If you''re happy with Mandrake, though, there''s no reason to change, unless you just want to try others out.

rm -rf /bin/laden

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